You are here: Home

Search results

46 items matching your search terms.
Filter the results.
Item type


























New items since



Sort by relevance · date (newest first) · alphabetically
Journal EntryDealing with repeat injuries
The August 16 edition of the New York Times has an interesting piece on how athletes try to follow their passion for sport while at the same time coping with the frustration of repeated injuries.
Located in HPRC Blog
Journal EntryIs high endurance running harmful to your heart?
MedicalNewsToday.com presents an article that reports on a 2009 study from the European Journal of Echocardiography that assesses the effects of running in ultra-endurance races.
Located in HPRC Blog
Journal EntryRunners: How to pace yourself on hills
A study published this year in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise suggests that most runners make two key mistakes: They try to run too fast uphill and don’t run fast enough downhill.
Located in HPRC Blog
Journal EntryStudy indicates better results by periodically alternating training program
It has been known to trainers that alternating higher intensity and lower intensity training sessions is the most effective means for conditioning athletes. As reported in the September 20, 2010 edition of the Tauton Daily Gazzette (Tauton, MA), recent research indicates that it is not necessary to train at high-effort levels every exercise session.
Located in HPRC Blog
Journal EntryAvoiding the "weekend-warrior" injury syndrome
Are you putting yourself at risk by training too hard on the weekends?
Located in HPRC Blog
Journal EntryTreadmills vs. elliptical machines – which is better?
A look at two gym favorites.
Located in HPRC Blog
Journal EntryHottest fitness trends for 2011: Boot camp, strength training
According to an article in the October 28, 2010 edition of USA Today, boot-camp workouts, strength training and core exercises are among next year's top 20 trends.
Located in HPRC Blog
Journal EntryTrain in warm weather to improve performance anytime
Science Daily reports on a new study published in the Journal of Applied Physiology that indicates training in warm weather not only improves heat acclimation and performance in the heat, but also improves performance in cool conditions.
Located in HPRC Blog
Journal EntryA strong country stays fit
Why aren't there more of us out there exercising?
Located in HPRC Blog
Journal Entry ECMAScript programExercise smart to prevent injuries
Some tips to keep you from hurting yourself while exercising
Located in HPRC Blog