You are here: Home

Search results

146 items matching your search terms.
Filter the results.
Item type

























New items since



Sort by relevance · date (newest first) · alphabetically
Journal EntryHerbs at a glance
Visit the website of the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine for information on many of the herbs used as and in dietary supplements.
Located in HPRC Blog
Journal Entry text/texmacsZinc: Some Facts
Your body needs zinc for a number of essential functions, so make sure your diet includes foods that provide this nutrient.
Located in HPRC Blog
Journal Entry D source codeThe lure of Jack3d
This relatively recent supplement targeting the exercise performance market has been growing in popularity, but the limited information about its “recipe” and the severe warnings on its label and website should make potential users think twice.
Located in HPRC Blog
Journal EntryDo you really need to take a multivitamin?
Do you really need to take a multivitamin? How can you be sure that you’re taking the right one, or if you even need to take one at all?
Located in HPRC Blog
Journal EntryHerbal products: Important information to know
Herbal products are advertised as “natural," but are they safe? The American Academy of Family Physicians has some answers to important questions.
Located in HPRC Blog
Journal Entry text/texmacsEnergy drinks and adolescents
Energy drink use by adolescents is on the rise, and misuse of these beverages may stem from confusion about using energy drinks for rehydration.
Located in HPRC Blog
Journal Entry ECMAScript programFDA seeks to remove Lazy Cakes from shelves
Lazy Cakes, the melatonin-laced brownies that have caused some controversy in the past several months, have been deemed unsafe by the Food and Drug Administration.
Located in HPRC Blog
Journal EntryTools for the healthcare provider
Two new healthcare provider tools are available on HPRC’s website: a dietary supplement history questionnaire and a video of an effective way to ask about dietary supplement use.
Located in HPRC Blog
Journal Entry text/texmacsUSADA Athletic Advisory: Methylhexaneamine and dietary supplements
Athletes are advised to avoid consuming supplements that contain the prohibited stimulant methylhexaneamine, also known as DMAA.
Located in HPRC Blog
Journal EntryMore on Jack3d and OxyElite Pro
Jack3d and OxyElite Pro contain the ingredient DMAA, but recent findings do not support claims that it is a “natural” derivative from the geranium plant. It’s another story of “buyer beware.”
Located in HPRC Blog