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Welcome to the HPRC Blog. We've got lots of information here, from quick tips to in-depth posts about detailed human performance optimization topics.

DMAA is still around

HPRC’s list of dietary supplement products containing DMAA has been updated again, revealing some new products even though DMAA is an illegal ingredient.

DMAA has been illegal as a dietary supplement ingredient for more than 2 years, but products containing this substance continue to be available. Many are still being produced (or produced again), and some are even new. That means it’s very important to read dietary supplement product labels carefully to make sure yours doesn’t contain this potentially dangerous ingredient. Not only could it be dangerous to your health, it could also be dangerous to your military career. DoD follows federal policy with regard to the use and possession of substances and products considered illegal.

Keep in mind, though, that pre-workout, weight loss, and other performance dietary supplements without DMAA also may not be safe for your health. In fact, FDA has already declared two DMAA “replacement” ingredients unsuitable for use in dietary supplements: DMBA and BMPEA. For more information, please visit these Operation Supplement Safety (OPSS) FAQs:

And please visit the newest update of “Dietary Supplement Products Containing DMAA,” which lists DMAA-containing products past and present.


How much protein?

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
Filed under: Diet, Nutrition
Every body’s protein needs are different. Find out how to calculate your own protein needs to optimize your performance.

Whether you’re an endurance athlete, a strength athlete, or doing a bit of both to stay in fighting shape, the optimal amount of protein for your daily needs depends on your activity level and body weight. Regardless of the amounts, the best sources of protein are always whole foods such as meat, poultry, fish, dairy products, nuts/seeds, beans, and legumes.

Check out HPRC’s Protein Infosheet and protein calculator to determine the amounts that are right for you. Eating more protein than your body needs isn’t necessarily better. Going beyond these protein recommendations won’t provide any additional benefit to your performance.

Tips for caregivers

Caregivers play an essential role in the recovery of an injured, ill, or wounded service member. The emotional, physical, and psychological health of the caregiver is also important in this process.

When a wounded, ill or injured service member returns home, his or her life has significantly changed, and so have the lives of the caregivers and family. DoD recognizes the importance of the caregiver and family in the recovery process. However, caregiving can be stressful, and you run the risk of burnout when you focus solely on others without time to recharge. So it’s important to take time for yourself too. Read on to learn HPRC’s top tips for caregivers and families.

Preventing trench mouth

Maintaining good oral health can be challenging in the field. Learn how to keep your mouth healthy!

Poor oral health adversely affects readiness and could cost you your career, but it’s something you can prevent. Despite advances in dental care and hygiene, deployed service members are still at risk for trench mouth—technically referred to as “necrotizing periodontal disease,” or NPD—a condition that can lead to painful ulcers, spontaneous gum bleeding, and a foul taste in the mouth. A variety of factors can contribute to poor oral health, so we offer a few solutions. And remember to visit your dentist regularly when you can. 

  • Poor hygiene
    • When deployed, you may have little time for oral hygiene, making you fall out of your normal routine of brushing and flossing.
    • Solution: Pack a few travel-size tubes of toothpaste, dental floss, and a travel toothbrush in your kit, and establish a routine as quickly as possible.
  • Tobacco use
    • Using tobacco products can lead to gum disease by reducing blood flow to your gums, which can lead to tooth loss and mouth infections.
    • Solution: It’s never too late to quit. Check out these great tips to become tobacco-free.
  • Poor nutrition
    • Eating right can be challenging in the field. But not eating enough food or the right foods can cause vitamin and mineral deficiencies that reduce your ability to fight oral infections.
    • Solution: Although MREs can’t replicate the tastes of a home cooked meal, they’re nutritionally balanced to prevent vitamin and mineral deficiencies. Eat a variety of MREs and eat as many of the components as you can to make sure you get all the nutrients they provide
  • Stress
    • Too much stress can adversely affect many aspects of performance and overall health, including dental health. Stress can cause dry mouth and sore, inflamed gums.
    • Solution: Start learning how to reduce stress with the ideas in this article from HPRC.


Countdown to end childhood obesity

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
Millions of kids are overweight or obese, but together we can put an end to that. It’s as easy as “5-2-1-0.”

Roughly one in 3 children in the U.S. is overweight or obese, but you can do something about it. Obese children are more likely to be obese as adults and at risk for diabetes and other health conditions, so it’s important to act early. September is Childhood Obesity Month, so there’s no better time to start.

Let’s Go! is a childhood obesity prevention program to help kids eat better, be more physically active, and live healthier lives. Just remember their “5-2-1-0” countdown message:

5 – Get your kids to eat at least 5 fruits and vegetables every day. Make it fun with kid-friendly recipes. Let your kids choose fruits and veggies at the store that they want to try, help prepare meals and snacks in the kitchen, or even plant a vegetable garden together.

2 – Cut down kids’ screen time to 2 hours or less a day. (No screen time for those under 2.) Get them to try other ways to be entertained, such as playing a game or going on a scavenger hunt. These types of activities will get your kids’ bodies and minds working.

1 – Kids need at least one hour of moderate to vigorous physical activity every day. Sound like a lot? Just think of it as playing instead of exercise! Make it a family affair. Go to the playground, play a sport, or simply go for a walk around the neighborhood together.

0Zero sugar-sweetened sodas, sports drinks, and fruit drinks. Instead, have your kids drink water and fat-free or one-percent milk. If your kids aren’t fans of plain water, add a little pizazz with some sliced berries, citrus fruits, melons, or kiwis. And they can eat the fruit when they’re finished drinking!

For more information, tips, and resources, please visit Let’s Go!

Energy drinks and teens don’t mix

Energy drinks have become increasingly popular among teens, but they provide no health benefit and can even be harmful.

It’s cause for concern: Approximately 30% of teens consume energy drinks on a regular basis. Energy drinks provide no nutritional benefit and can actually pose health risks to adolescents, including increased heart rate, high blood pressure, anxiety, digestive problems, sleep disturbances, dehydration, and even death. Teens who consume energy drinks are also more likely to engage in unhealthy behaviors such as drinking more sugar-sweetened beverages, smoking cigarettes, and using drugs and alcohol.

Many of the negative effects associated with energy drinks are due to the large amounts of stimulants in these beverages. Their caffeine content can range from 50 to more than 500 mg per can or bottle. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that children and teens:

  • consume no more than 100 mg of caffeine per day (equal to about 2 cans of caffeine-containing soda or one 8 oz. cup of coffee) and
  • avoid energy drinks altogether.

However, the amount of caffeine teens consume from energy drinks is trending upwards, in part due to heavy marketing with celebrity athletes. Be sure to talk to your teens about the potential problems associated with energy drinks, and make sure they don’t confuse them with sports drinks.

Tattoos in uniform

HPRC Fitness Arena: Total Force Fitness
Filed under: Tattoos
Considering getting a tattoo? Learn military guidelines and safety tips.

Tattoos are a point of pride with many—civilians and service members alike—but the military has specific guidelines on this form of body art. The following general guidelines apply:

  • Tattoos or brandings that might be considered gang-related, extremist, sexist (including nudity), racist, or supremacist are not allowed.
  • Tattoos may not appear to endorse the use of illegal drugs.
  • Other obscene, offensive, or discriminatory tattoos are also not tolerated.
  • Tattoos cannot show above the neck, that is, on the head, neck, or face.

Other regulations vary by branch and are usually more restrictive. For example, in the Army, soldiers may have one ring tattoo on each hand, but no other tattoos on the wrists or hands. The Air Force limits tattoos to less than 25% of the body visible when in uniform. In the Navy, only tattoos that endorse good order, discipline, and morale are allowed, and they may not be larger than the wearer’s hand with fingers extended. Marine Corps regulations are complex and include “grandfathering in” of some tattoos obtained prior to enlisting; see USMC’s “Are you grandfathered?” poster. The Coast Guard has similar limitations, with more details on permitted body art in the U.S. Coast Guard’s Uniform Regulations. Please visit these links for details for your service branch.

And buyer beware! The U.S. government does not regulate tattoo inks. More than 10% of tattooed people recently surveyed reported unwanted side effects such as pain, itching, infections requiring antibiotics, and scabbing. A significant number of these involved red and black inks. Given these possible drawbacks, choose your tattoo parlor carefully. These FDA tips can put you on the right path:

  • Use a hygienic tattoo parlor.
  • Avoid do-it-yourself tattoo inking and removal methods.
  • Consult a healthcare provider about tattoo removal or any complications arising from body art.

Are supplements the “whey” to protein?

Whey protein is often referred to as the “king of proteins.” But are whey protein supplements the best option for muscle growth and recovery?

Whole foods, not dietary supplements, should be your first choice for protein. Protein supports muscle growth and repair. People often turn to protein supplements (such as whey, casein, and soy) to optimize those effects, especially after a workout. Whole food protein sources such as lean meats, fish, dairy products, legumes, nuts, and seeds are just as effective (in some cases more effective) than protein supplements. Whey protein products can be an acceptable, convenient, and efficient way to deliver protein when your needs are greater or when normal dietary sources are not available. If you are using protein supplements, be sure to choose a product that has been third-party evaluated for its quality. Read more here.

Transitioning to a civilian job

HPRC Fitness Arena: Mind Tactics, Total Force Fitness
Changing to a new job is difficult, especially your first job after leaving the military. Here are some tips to help you make an easier transition.

Using skills learned before and during military service, along with a positive attitude, can help make your transition from the military to a civilian job a bit easier. One reason you may find this career change so difficult is that your professional life makes up a significant part of your identity. Therefore when you transition from military to civilian life, you may need to learn how to overcome some career challenges.

Finding a successful career path is easier if you’re aware of the skill sets you already have and have some idea what sorts of jobs would give you fulfillment and meaning. Read on to learn some tips you might find useful in transitioning from your military service to finding a job as a civilian. Read more here.

Healthy eating for healthy joints

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
Is what you eat keeping your joints healthy? Find out how nutrition can help your joints carry on.

You can take control of how your daily eating habits help or hurt your body’s joints. The physical demands of training and missions—along with day-to-day exercise, overuse, injury, and aging—can take their toll on your joints over time. There are certain eating habits you can practice to help keep your joints happy and healthy for the long run.

  • Aim for a healthy weight. Extra weight means extra stress on your joints – walking alone can cause your knees to take on 3–6 times your body weight. Maintain a healthy weight or lose weight if you need to. Visit HPRC’s Fighting Weight Strategies for ideas.
  • Fight inflammation. Include omega-3 fatty acids on your plate to reduce your body’s inflammation. Salmon isn’t your only source; foods such as English walnuts, flaxseeds and their oil, canola oil, and other fish contribute omega-3s to your eating plan. See HPRC’s omega-3 table for more foods rich in omega-3s.
  • Fill up on fruits and veggies. Fruits and vegetables, all of which are nutrient-heavy, have been linked to a lower incidence of joint diseases such as osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Fill half your plate with fruits and vegetables at meals, and build snacks around them too.
  • Revive with vitamin C. Because of its role in forming collagen (the main component of connective tissue) and as an antioxidant, foods high in vitamin C are important for joint health. Oranges, Brussels sprouts, strawberries, red peppers, and kiwi are excellent sources.

Focusing on a healthy weight and filling up on nutrient-rich foods, along with regular exercise and stretching, can help optimize the long-term health and performance of your joints. 

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