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Welcome to the HPRC Blog. We've got lots of information here, from quick tips to in-depth posts about detailed human performance optimization topics.

“X” out tobacco

HPRC Fitness Arena: Mind Body, Total Force Fitness
Filed under: Apps, Smoking, Tobacco
Join the fun today and play tXtobacco, a new contest sponsored by the DoD and partners.

The Department of Defense (DoD), Quit Tobacco-UCanQuit2.org, and the National Cancer Institute have teamed up to promote tobacco-free living in the military with a new contest called tXtobacco.

  • What is it? tXtobacco is a text-message trivia game. The aim of the contest is to improve knowledge and change attitudes towards tobacco among service members and provide support to those who use tobacco.
  • How does it work? After you enroll, you’ll receive weekly text-message questions for one month. Points are awarded for participation and correct answers, and top-scorers will be acknowledged on weekly online leader boards.
  • Who can play? tXtobacco is designed for active-duty service members in post-basic training (both smokers and non-smokers) aged 18–24. But anyone in DoD can participate and is encouraged to join.
  • How do I sign up? Signing up is quick and easy. Just text TRIVIA to 47848. If you’re participating as part of a registered group, text the program code as well. Installation and service leads can request program codes by contacting info@UCanQuit2.org.
  • When can I start? Now! The contest is offered on a rolling basis and ends 12 December 2016. The last day to enroll is 13 November 2016.

For more information about tXtobacco, visit Quit Tobacco-UCanQuit2.org. Let the games begin!

More “tainted” products

FDA continues to identify over-the-counter products, including dietary supplements, containing hidden active ingredients. Could yours be one of them?

Since July 2016, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has released over 25 Public Notifications about individual supplement products marketed for sexual enhancement and weight loss that contain hidden active ingredients. Through laboratory testing, these products were found to contain drugs and controlled substances—ingredients that pose health and readiness risks. For a list of these Public Notifications, visit FDA’s Tainted Sexual Enhancement Products and Tainted Weight Loss Products.

The most common types of products found to contain “undeclared” ingredients (that is, substances not listed on the label) are those marketed for weight loss, sexual enhancement, and bodybuilding. Dietary supplements don’t require FDA approval before being put on the market, and there is no way to know the contents of a product without laboratory testing. So if you’re considering a dietary supplement, check the label to see if the product has been evaluated by an independent third-party organization.

Back-to-school ABCs for Total Family Fitness

Filed under: Family, Kids, School
School starts soon! Find out how to make a Total Family Fitness transition back to school this fall.

As summer vacation comes to an end, the transition back to school is just around the corner. Now’s the time to review the ABCs of a Total Family Fitness transition back to school: Awareness, Bedtime, Calmness, Diet, and Exercise. This is your chance to lay a foundation for your family’s healthy habits throughout the school year. HPRC's Total Family Fitness approach focuses on the health, wellness, and resilience of your family. It can help optimize and strengthen your family’s performance by integrating strategies that impact their mind, body, relationships, and environment—many of the same strategies used in the Total Force Fitness model for Warfighters. Read more...

If the shoe fits—Part 3: Tying your shoelaces

Filed under: Gear, Running, Training
Find out how to lace your running shoes for a better fit.

This third and final article in HPRC’s series about running shoes “ties” everything together. Although there are lots of different ways to tie them, the traditional way sometimes doesn’t cut it. Is your heel slipping? There’s a lace-up for that. Do you have a hot spot? There’s a lace-up for that. Check out the videos below for shoelace-tying fixes to 3 common foot problems:

Heel lock. What are those extra eyelets at the top of your shoes? Use those eyelets and this heel-lock method to secure your foot, without having to tighten the rest of your shoelaces.

Black toenails. Are your toenails turning black and blue? Tie your shoelaces to help pull the shoe away from your toes, giving them more wiggle room. Remember: The lace ends don’t have to be even once you start lacing your shoes. The diagonal lace can be a little shorter to start with, but leave enough so you can finish tying your shoes.

Hot spot or high arches. Is there a sore spot on the top of your foot? Or do you have high arches? Lace around painful areas—not over them—by moving the laces up or down, depending on where the irritation is located.

If you haven’t seen them yet, be sure to read Part 1 and Part 2 of the running-shoe series.

Can Olympians motivate your eating?

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
Many of us will be glued to our TVs, watching the Olympic Games over the next several days. What can we learn about nourishing our bodies from these elite athletes?

Olympic athletes follow a rigorous training schedule with their eyes on the Gold, and what they eat and drink can make a winning difference! Most of them work with sports dietitians to help reach their nutrition goals. However, others can learn from their examples as well:

  • Food fuels and nourishes your body to help you perform well. Olympic athletes teach the importance of nutritious fueling every day by including the right balance of foods and beverages for each workout and event.
  • Successful Olympians jump-start their days with breakfasts that include protein and carbohydrate-rich foods. This keeps them energized and ready for the next challenge.
  • It’s important to keep a healthy relationship with food. Food is more than fuel. Even after eating to meet a specific goal, sometimes it’s still healthy to eat a favorite food just because you’re in the mood. However, some Olympians are at greater risk of eating disorders, especially those who become too focused on body image and develop an unhealthy relationship with food.
  • There’s no one-size-fits-all approach to calorie needs. Some endurance athletes take in over 5,000 calories daily. The United States Olympic Committee provides helpful eating guidelines for its athletes.

Remember that the goal for a healthy lifestyle is something greater than Gold: your wellness!

Fun facts: Did you know that the Armed Forces Sports (AFS) program paves the way for service members to compete in national, Olympic, and international athletic competitions?

Let’s cheer on the 16 Armed Forces members participating in Rio’s Olympic Games and those who will compete in the Paralympics next month.

Go team USA!

Does “cupping” reduce pain?

HPRC Fitness Arena: Total Force Fitness
What is “cupping”? Is it effective at treating pain?

“Cupping” has received attention recently with discussion of Olympic athletes using the practice to relieve pain and improve performance. However, evidence for the effectiveness of cupping is mixed.

Cupping therapy is a traditional Chinese medical practice that is popular in Asia, the Middle East, and in some parts of Europe. During treatment, a cup is placed on the skin over muscles and a vacuum is created to remove the air inside the cup. The vacuum against the skin is thought to promote blood flow to the tissue underneath the cup, which might bring relief of pain and tension. Cupping typically leaves reddish to purple circles on the body where the cups were placed. The bruises can take several days to weeks to fade.

Cupping is generally considered safe but should always be performed by a qualified professional. One obvious side effect is the circular bruises. Patients also report feeling warmer during the treatment and sometimes sweat more. Cupping is not recommended if you are pregnant or menstruating, or if you have metastatic cancer or bone fracture. It shouldn’t be applied to injured skin. There’s an increase risk of complication when the duration of treatment lasts more then 20 minutes, and some patients have been burned during cupping therapy.

How effective is cupping? The jury is still out at this point. There haven’t been enough studies to say definitively how effective cupping is at reducing pain compared to other pain management techniques. More rigorous research is needed before cupping can be called an effective treatment for pain. Talk with your doctor or healthcare provider before adding cupping to your pain management plan.

Preventing veteran suicides

HPRC Fitness Arena: Mind Body, Total Force Fitness
Learn more about what the VA is doing to help veterans at risk of suicide.

In 2014, an average of 20 veterans died from suicide each day. And after recently reviewing 55 million veteran records from 1979 to 2014, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) determined those who are older, middle-aged, and female are most at risk. However, the VA is ramping up its efforts to help save veterans’ lives.

Suicide rates also are much higher among veterans than civilians. For example, suicide risk among veterans was 21% higher than civilians in 2014. The good news is the VA continues to shape policy and work towards meeting its suicide-prevention goals, including:

  • Expanding crisis lines and telemental health services
  • Identifying at-risk veterans who can benefit from early intervention
  • Improving mental health services for women
  • Providing telephone-coaching support for veterans and their families
  • Deploying mobile apps that can help veterans manage their mental health issues

“Every veteran suicide is a tragic outcome and regardless of the rates, one veteran suicide is one too many,” according to the VA. For accurate diagnosis, or to simply check in with a caring professional, consider consulting a qualified mental health therapist. The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) website offers good information and helpful resources. Also, Military OneSource offers support and services to improve your mental health and well-being.

If you feel you're experiencing a potentially life-threatening problem, contact the Military Crisis Line online or call 800-273-8255 and press “1,” or the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline online or by phone at 1-800-273-TALK (8255). The Defense Centers of Excellence (DCoE) also has a 24/7 Outreach Center featuring a hotline, email, chat, and phone number. And visit HPRC’s Suicide Prevention page. In an emergency, please dial 911.

Supplements for concussions?

Don’t fall for dietary supplement products claiming to help with concussions.

Two-a-day practices have started for teens in fall sports. One big issue is concussion education: learning the signs of a concussion and then what to do if you actually have one—or if someone you know does. Several dietary supplement manufacturers have promoted products to help with recovery from concussions and traumatic brain injuries (TBIs), but there isn’t enough scientific evidence to support these claims. If you suffer from a concussion or TBI, make sure you follow your doctor’s orders for recovery. And if you have children involved in sports, watch them for possible signs.

FDA warns consumers to avoid using products that claim to prevent or treat a concussion or TBI. For more information, read FDA’s Consumer Update on dietary supplements and concussions.

 

If the shoe fits—Part 2: The right fit

Filed under: Gear, Running
Part 2 of HPRC’s running-shoe series focuses on getting the perfect fit.

If you read our running-shoe article from last week, then you know how to use your old shoes’ wear pattern to narrow down the kind of shoes you need. Now focus on making sure your new running shoes fit properly. First, be prepared before heading out to the store.

  • Bring or wear a pair of good socks, preferably the kind you’ll be running in.
  • Bring any insoles or orthotics you usually wear during runs. Tip: Replace the insoles from your new shoes with your own orthotics or insoles to ensure a comfortable fit.
  • Shop later in the day—when your feet are flattened and more swollen—to get an accurate measurement.

Make sure to try before you buy! Check out these helpful hints on heel cup, snug fit, and wiggle room:

Running Shoe Fit Infographic PNG

Part 3 of this series will show a few different ways to tie your shoelaces for the most comfortable fit. And if you haven’t already, read Part 1 of this series.

Telling kids about their parent’s injury

Talking with your children about their other parent’s injury can be hard because there’s no good way to share bad news. Find out what helps ease the conversation.

Returning home after a deployment can be exciting but stressful. Still, coming home might present even greater challenges, especially when a service member is injured. Explaining an injury—either visible or invisible—to your children can seem overwhelming, but there are ways to help them cope with things.

It’s normal to worry about your children’s reaction to physical or mental injuries. If possible, talk with them about their other parent’s injuries before your family reunites. Children, family dynamics, and injuries are all unique. So, keep these in mind during your talk:

  • Use age-appropriate words to describe the other parent’s injury. For example, what you say to your six-year-old is different than what you discuss with your sixteen-year-old.
  • Talk about what happened. Be honest when explaining the injury, how it occurred, and any expectations about recovery. Not knowing what’s going on might cause kids to imagine scary, wrong, or bad things.
  • Give it time. Everyone responds differently to difficult news. Don’t force things. Be patient with your kids and yourself too. Support your children however they respond. And encourage them to share their feelings and ask questions.
  • Be a role model. Children take cues from their parents. If you cope well with your service member’s treatment, your kids are more likely to as well.
  • Reassure your children. They’ll want to know that even though their injured parent looks or acts differently, he or she is still the same person who loves and cares about them.

Remember: There’s no perfect explanation you can give your children. What’s most important? Talk, listen, and avoid judging their responses. And visit HPRC’s Returning Home/Reintegration and Post-Deployment sections to learn more.

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