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HPRC Fitness Arena: Dietary Supplements

Is your supplement adulterated or misbranded?

Filed under: FDA, OPSS, Supplements
Some dietary supplement products contain ingredients that just shouldn’t be there. Here’s what to look out for.

In recent years, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has taken action against dietary supplement companies for selling products with ingredients that put them in a category of being “adulterated” or “misbranded.” Examples of these ingredients include Acacia rigidula, BMPEA, DMAA, DMBA, ephedra, methylsynephrine, and picamilon. Such ingredients have been determined to be unsafe, lack evidence of safety, don’t meet the definition of a dietary ingredient, or combinations of these issues. Some are even used as drugs in other countries.

Although these ingredients are not allowed in dietary supplements, you might still find them in some products, so always read product labels carefully. Service members especially take note! Since FDA has declared the ingredients listed above (and others) to be “illegal” or “not allowed” in dietary supplements for one reason or another, commands have restricted their use by military members. For more information about FDA’s role in regulating dietary supplement products and ingredients, visit FDA’s web page.

What’s the deal with DHEA?

Filed under: OPSS, Supplements
DHEA is a hormone and marketed to have anabolic effects. Does this make it illegal?

DHEA, short for dehydroepiandrosterone (also known as Prasterone), and chemical variations of this dietary supplement ingredient are commonly found in products marketed for sexual enhancement and bodybuilding such as testosterone boosters and prohormones. They’re also marketed to produce effects similar to anabolic steroids. Unlike anabolic steroids, DHEA is not illegal, but it is prohibited by professional sports organizations such as the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) and the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). Members of the Coast Guard should especially look out for supplements containing this ingredient, as they are not permitted to take any substances NCAA classifies as anabolic agents. To learn more, visit the OPSS FAQ about DHEA.

Stimulants – Are you up to speed?

Check out the new OPSS infographic about stimulants!

Operation Supplement Safety (OPSS) has a new infographic about stimulants. Do you want to know what types of dietary supplements commonly contain stimulants? Or how to tell if your supplement contains a stimulant? Or what can happen if you take too much or too many stimulants? Get up to speed and check out the infographic below with information on what you need to know about these dietary supplement ingredients. Use it in conjunction with the OPSS stimulants list to help you with these ingredients often found in dietary supplements.

Full Image of the Stimulants PDF

Acacia rigidula: another FDA target

Dietary supplement products containing Acadia rigidula are not allowed.

Another ingredient that has been showing up in dietary supplement products recently is Acadia rigidula. FDA recently declared that it is not acceptable in such products because it falls in the class known as a “new dietary ingredient.” A. rigidula is just the latest in a series of ingredients FDA has disallowed for this reason. Others include DMAA, DMBA, BMPEA, and aegeline. Visit the Operation Supplement Safety (OPSS) FAQ about Acacia rigidula to learn more, and explore the OPSS FAQs about ingredients to learn about others not permitted in dietary supplement products. especially BMPEA, which has been associated with A. rigidula.

Dietary supplements and women’s health

How does military training and pregnancy affect women’s nutritional status and need for supplements?

Military training and pregnancy increase women’s nutritional needs, specifically for vitamin D, calcium, iron, folate, and iodine. While HPRC always recommends choosing whole foods first, sometimes it can be difficult to get enough of those nutrients through food alone. When nutrient needs are higher than normal or when nutrient-rich foods aren’t available, vitamin and mineral supplements can help women to restore nutrient levels in their bodies. Just remember that you don’t need supplements unless you have known nutrient deficiencies, so talk to your healthcare provider before taking any supplement. Read more...

Celebrate Mother’s Day

Filed under: Family, Relationships
Celebrate Mother’s Day wherever you’re serving—at home or abroad.

Mother’s Day is set aside to honor mothers, but for service members who can’t celebrate with their moms or who can’t take time to celebrate being a mom, it can be hard. But still do your best to take time and recognize the special moms in your life.

  • Show your appreciation with a handwritten note or ecard. If you’re feeling creative, make a card from scratch—just like you did as a kid—and drop it in the mail.
  • Enjoy a physical activity together. Go walking, running, biking, hiking, or do yoga. Maintaining a healthy lifestyle, together or apart, can help you both enjoy Mother’s Day in the future too.
  • Nourish your mom with healthy treats or a homemade meal. And consider inviting a mom who doesn’t have family nearby. Good food and conversation can make her day special too.

If you can’t be with your mom, then schedule a time to talk or video chat. Let her know how much you cherish your relationship. And ask any questions you might have wondered about, such as:

  • How are we alike or different?
  • What did you really think when I joined the military (or married someone in the military)?
  • Is it easier being a mother now that your kids are grown?
  • What do you hope the next few years will bring for our family?

If you’re feeling some sadness or anxiety, make a point to manage your stress. “Perfect” moms and/or children could evoke stress, even if you love them dearly. Consider mindfulness or other ways to cope, and make the best of this day.

Happy Mother’s Day to all military moms—service members, spouses, and mothers of service members!

Ketone supplements

Are ketone supplements the key to improving your performance?

If you’ve searched recently for dietary supplements to enhance your performance, you may have come across products marketed as “ketone supplements.” Before you consider taking any of these products, read the new Operation Supplement Safety FAQ about ketone supplements. Learn what ketone supplements are and if they’re worth the often-hefty price tag.

If you’re curious about other supplements marketed for performance, check out the OPSS Performance FAQs. Can’t find the answers you’re looking for? Send us a question using our Ask the Expert feature.

FDA says no to methylsynephrine

FDA has declared that methylsynephrine can’t be used in dietary supplements. Be sure to check your product label.

The Food and Drug Administration recently announced that methylsynephrine (also known as oxilofrine) “does not meet the statutory definition of a dietary supplement ingredient.” So what does this mean? Products containing methylsynephrine are adulterated and can’t be marketed legally as dietary supplements. Methylsynephrine is also prohibited in sport because it’s a pharmaceutical drug (not currently approved in the U.S) and a stimulant that increases blood pressure and affects heart rate. What’s more, some supplements have been found to contain methylsynephrine in amounts equal to or greater than pharmaceutical doses.

The consequences of taking methylsynephrine in large amounts or in combination with other stimulants aren’t entirely known, but one product containing this ingredient and other stimulants has been linked to nausea, vomiting, agitation, increased heart rate, chest pain, and cardiac arrest. If you’re considering taking a dietary supplement with methylsynephrine or oxilofrine on the label, you might want to think twice. For more from FDA, please see “Methylsynephrine in Dietary Supplements.”

Supplement safety for teen athletes

Filed under: Supplements, Teens
The science doesn’t support the use of supplements by teens. What can you do to keep them safe?

Most dietary supplement products are marketed for adults 18 and older and typically carry a warning on the label against use by those under 18. That’s because there has been little to no reliable research done on the use of dietary supplements—especially those marketed for bodybuilding and performance enhancement—by people under the age of 18. As such, the National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS) strongly opposes the use of dietary supplements by high school athletes to gain a competitive advantage.

Whether you’re a teen athlete, parent, coach, or healthcare provider, here are a few things to keep in mind:

Teens: Achieving your athletic goals means hard work. Taking shortcuts with dietary supplements can be harmful to your health and have a negative effect on your future athletic ambitions. Watch HPRC’s video below  to learn about one college athlete’s experience.

Parents and coaches: Talk often with your athletes about dietary supplements, and encourage them to eat whole foods to fuel their bodies. Download HPRC’s “Fueling the adolescent athlete,” which has helpful suggestions for hydrating and for eating between workouts.

Healthcare providers: Use the OPSS Guidelines to ask about supplement use as part of taking a comprehensive dietary supplement history. Counsel athletes and their parents about the risks involved with using dietary supplements and other performance-enhancing substances. Promote proper nutrition, training, and rest to improve performance.

Remember, teens (and adults) can get all the nutrients their bodies need by eating a variety of nutrient-rich foods. Teens and adults don’t need supplements unless a doctor determines it’s needed to treat deficiency of a particular nutrient.

SARMs don’t cut it

SARMs are unapproved drugs that keep popping up in dietary supplement products.

SARMs (selective androgen receptor modulators) are unapproved, experimental drugs sometimes illegally marketed and sold as dietary supplement products. They’re also available on the Internet in other forms, but their use in sport is prohibited. Use of SARMs can affect military performance and readiness.

Operation Supplement Safety (OPSS) has an FAQ about SARMS, including a link to a list of more than 200 dietary supplements and other commercial products containing SARMs. The list also includes an extensive list of SARM names to help you identify them on product labels.

HPRC’s Ask the Expert feature is available if you have particular questions about these ingredients or any other questions about dietary supplements.

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