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Welcome to the HPRC Blog. We've got lots of information here, from quick tips to in-depth posts about detailed human performance optimization topics.

HPRC Fitness Arena: Dietary Supplements

What’s the story with carnitine?

Carnitine, a component that occurs naturally in red meat (and sometimes is added to dietary supplements and energy drinks), may help reduce complications associated with heart attacks, but new research suggests it also may contribute to heart disease.

Carnitine is a naturally occurring substance in the human body that helps cells use fat for energy. The liver and kidneys can produce carnitine from amino acids provided by the diet, but carnitine also comes from many foods, especially red meat, and is an ingredient in many dietary supplements and energy drinks.

Sometimes doctors use carnitine to treat certain heart conditions. Recent clinical trials suggest that carnitine supplements may help reduce many of the complications associated with heart attacks, such as chest pain and irregular heart rhythms.

But new research suggests that long-term consumption of dietary carnitine also may play a role in the development of atherosclerosis—“hardening of the arteries”—especially in people who eat red meat regularly. So what’s the bottom line? More research is needed to determine the risks and benefits associated with carnitine.

You can learn more about carnitine in HPRC’s Dietary Supplement Classification System.

New OPSS FAQs about DMAA

FDA recently announced that DMAA is not a legal ingredient for dietary supplements and is advising consumers not to purchase or use DMAA-containing products. Read the updated FAQs in OPSS for more.

DMAA, which the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced illegal in dietary supplements on 11 April 2013, has been used in many weight-loss, bodybuilding, and performance-enhancement products. HPRC has received many questions about it use by military personnel. To help answer questions about DMAA in general, we put together an Operation Supplement Safety (OPSS) FAQ. OPSS also has FAQs about Jack3d and OxyElite Pro, two popular dietary supplement products. Be sure to check back often as we add answers to other questions about ingredients in performance-enhancing and weight-loss supplements and how to choose supplements safely.

FDA warns: DMAA in dietary supplements now illegal

FDA urges consumers to check all dietary supplement product labels to ensure they do not contain the illegal stimulant DMAA.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued a Consumer Update warning of the potential dangers of DMAA, which was announced illegal in dietary supplements on 11 April 2013. DMAA is also referred to as dimethylamylamine and other names. This dietary supplement product ingredient has been used in many weight-loss, bodybuilding, and performance-enhancement products. FDA received numerous reports of illnesses and death from the use of products containing DMAA; commonly reported reactions include heart and nervous system problems as well as psychiatric disorders. DMAA has been the focus of conflicting information regarding whether or not it is a natural extract from geranium. FDA has now found “the information insufficient to defend the use of DMAA as an ingredient in dietary supplements.” Online, FDA also stated, "Dietary supplements containing DMAA are illegal and FDA is doing everything within its authority to remove these products from the market."

For more information, read the FDA Q&A on DMAA here.

Raspberry ketone—the latest weight-loss craze

Raspberry ketone is a food additive and aromatic compound now being sold as a dietary supplement/ingredient touted to reduce fat and weight. Find out the facts and the science behind it all.

Raspberry ketone, touted to be an effective fat-loss and weight-loss supplement, occurs naturally in various red raspberries. The raspberry ketone in supplements is probably produced in the laboratory, as it would be too expensive to extract it from real raspberries. FDA recognizes that raspberry ketone as a food additive is “Generally Recognized as Safe” (GRAS) to consume in small amounts. However, the long-term effects in humans who consume it as a supplement are unknown. For more information, read HPRC’s InfoReveal on “Raspberry ketone.”

Dietary supplements and surgical procedures

Be careful about using dietary supplements if you are planning to have surgery or if you have recently had surgery. Some ingredients could cause problems.

Be extra cautious when taking dietary supplements before and after surgical procedures; some products can have serious negative effects on surgical procedures. For instance, certain supplements prevent certain blood cells (platelets) from clumping, resulting in excessive bleeding during surgery. Some of the ingredients commonly found in supplements that hinder platelet aggregation are ginko biloba, saw palmetto, glucosamine, black tea, fish oil, and garlic. If you are having a surgical operation, consider abstaining from these items or consume these items in moderation a few weeks before and after the procedure. For more a complete list of products and additional information, including other surgical risks associated with dietary supplements, read this web page from the Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database. And always read product labels carefully; many include warnings of potential medical risks, including the length of time prior to surgery that you should discontinue use.

What’s the story with deer velvet and IGF-1?

Questions about deer velvet and IGF-1? Are they banned in the military? Read the OPSS FAQs to find out.

Both deer velvet and IGF-1 have been in the news lately, and HPRC has received many questions about what these are and whether they improve athletic performance. Does deer velvet contain IGF-1? Read this OPSS FAQ about deer velvet to find out. To learn what IGF-1 is and whether it is banned in the military, read more in the OPSS FAQ about IGF-1. Be sure to check back often, as we add answers to other questions about ingredients in performance and weight-loss supplements and how to choose supplements safely.

Questions about C4 Extreme?

Will C4 Extreme cause you to “pop positive” on a drug test? Read the OPSS FAQ to find out the answer.

HPRC has received many questions about C4 Extreme and whether or not it will result in a positive drug test. We have posted an OPSS FAQ to answer the question. Be sure to check back often as we add answers to other questions about ingredients in performance and weight-loss supplements and how to choose supplements safely. If you have additional questions about a particular dietary supplement ingredient or product, please use our “Ask the Expert” button located on the OPSS home page.

Caffeine in supplements – how much?

Some of the most popular dietary supplements sold on military bases may give inaccurate—or no—information about caffeine content on their labels.

A Military Times article reports on a recent study of more than 30 of the most popular dietary supplements (in capsule form) sold on military bases analyzed to determine their caffeine content. Of the 20 supplements that listed caffeine as an ingredient on their labels, six did not specify the amount. These same six contained high amounts of caffeine (210-310 mg per serving)—three or more times the amount permitted by law in soft drinks. Five others revealed significantly different amounts—some more, some less—than the quantity stated on the product label.

Consuming too much caffeine can result in health issues. And if you don’t know how much is in the supplement you’re taking, it could be easy to overdo it if you also drink coffee or energy drinks. Visit the Operation Supplement Safety (OPSS) FAQ on caffeine for additional information.

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