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HPRC Fitness Arena: Dietary Supplements

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FDA Press Release: FDA Warns about Counterfeit ExtenZe Dietary Supplements

HPRC Fitness Arena:
The FDA is warning consumers about a counterfeit product marketed as the dietary supplement product “ExtenZe”

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued a press release to consumers warning them about a counterfeit product being represented as the dietary supplement "ExtenZe.” The counterfeit product has hidden ingredients, including tadalafil or a combination of tadalafil and sildenafil, which are active ingredients of FDA-approved drugs, making these products unapproved drugs. Taking these products with prescription medications containing nitrates could lower blood pressure to dangerous levels. More information, including the lot numbers on the counterfeit packages, is provided in the FDA Press Release.

Help or hindrance? Market for melatonin-laced brownie snacks persists

HPRC Fitness Arena:
Lazy Cakes, Kush Cakes and Lulla Pies are the names of melatonin-laced snacks that have been in the news lately as an anti-dote to the trend of energy/caffeinated powered beverages and products. But the research on whether they are safe, or that they actually work, has not been established.

Lazy Cakes, Kush Cakes, and Lulla Pies are the names of melatonin-laced snacks that have been in the news lately as an antidote to the trend of energy/caffeinated powered beverages and products. But there is no research available on whether they are safe, or whether they actually work.

The New York Times reported on the sale of these products and others that are being sold online and in convenience stores and smoke shops. Some claim melatonin has a relaxing effect and can be used to alleviate jet lag or simply help induce sleep. But the Food and Drug Administration hasn't approved melatonin as a food additive or confirmed its safety when used as a sleep aid.

The HPRC began encountering stories of melatonin-laced brownie products back in March 2011, and we posted a Healthy Tip then that focused on the emergence of Lazy Cakes.

Do dietary supplements have a hidden health price?

HPRC Fitness Arena:
A recent study revealed that people who take dietary supplements tend to be less careful about diet and exercise. Supplements are not a substitute for a healthy lifestyle.

The sale of dietary supplements is a $27 billion-plus industry, and it continues to grow each year. Roughly half of the U.S. population now uses supplements, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics. People take dietary supplements hoping they will improve their health and possibly reduce the risk of disease. But do supplements really improve a person’s health? We at HPRC pondered this question after reading a recent study published in Psychological Science.

The study looked at how people who take dietary supplements behave and whether they make healthier food choices than people who do not take supplements. One group was instructed to take a multivitamin, while the other group was instructed to take a placebo, but in actuality both groups actually received the placebo. It turned out that the group who thought they were taking a dietary supplement actually made less health-conscious choices, such as being less interested in exercise and choosing a buffet over an organic meal.

It seems as though the dietary supplements act like insurance for some individuals, as if their supplement of choice is a sort of a magic pill, as a result of which they don’t need to worry about food choices and daily exercise. But there are no magic pills, and it’s important to remember that dietary supplements aren’t meant to replace a healthy diet. According to the FDA, dietary supplements are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. Eating a variety of foods daily is important for overall health.

Good sources of information on eating healthy are the Dietary Guidelines for Americans and MyPyramid. While there is evidence that some dietary supplements can be beneficial—such as calcium and vitamin D for bone health, and folic acid for decreasing the risk of some birth defects—more research is needed on the effects of many other supplements. Due the assortment of active ingredients in dietary supplements, we need to be aware of their potential effects on our bodies.

Taking dietary supplements doesn’t automatically make a person healthy, and it doesn’t guarantee an individual will be free of health problems. The recent study mentioned above showed that taking supplements actually can lead people to make poor health decisions, so it’s a good idea to follow the simple principles of a healthy lifestyle: a varied, nutritious diet combined with daily exercise.

The FTC and fake acai “news” claims

HPRC Fitness Arena:
Watch out for apparent news websites, even those displaying recognizable logos, that make weight-loss claims for acai berry supplements. The FTC is targeting these deceptive practices.

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) is seeking to bar deceptive claims made by websites posing as reputable news sites to entice consumers to buy acai berry weight-loss products. The FTC says these companies are not “news-gathering organizations” and their claims that acai berry supplements can cause rapid weight loss are unsupported. For more information, read the FTC release: “FTC Seeks to Halt 10 Operators of Fake News Sites from Making Claims About Acai Berry Weight Loss Products.”

FDA Press Release: FDA and FTC issue warning letter to companies selling fraudulent STD products

HPRC Fitness Arena:
The FDA and FTC have issued a warning to companies marketing unproven products to treat STDs.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) issued warning letters to several companies selling unproven products claiming to treat, cure, and prevent sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). These products—such as Medavir, Herpaflor, Viruxo, C-Cure, and Never an Outbreak—violate federal law because the FDA has not evaluated them for safety and effectiveness. Some are marketed as dietary supplements, but the FDA considers them drugs since they are offered for the treatment of disease. More information is provided in the FDA Press Release.

What is vitamin B12?

HPRC Fitness Arena:
Make sure you get enough vitamin B12 every day. It’s an essential nutrient that must be obtained from food; your body can’t make it.

Vitamin B12 is one of the eight B vitamins and is water-soluble. Our bodies do not store vitamin B12 so we must consume it daily. It is an important nutrient that helps make DNA, the genetic material in cells, and is essential for normal functioning of the brain and nervous system. Good food choices for vitamin B12 are beef liver, clams, fish, meat, poultry, eggs, and other dairy products. Read the Office of Dietary Supplement’s Vitamin B12 Fact Sheet for additional information.

What are hidden sources of caffeine?

HPRC Fitness Arena:
The labels on products often don’t mention caffeine content, so you have to know what ingredients contribute caffeine where you may not expect it.

We know about colas, coffee, tea, and chocolate, but caffeine can also be found in some over-the-counter drugs and herbal dietary supplement products. Energy drinks contain caffeine, and some also contain guarana, a plant with high amounts of caffeine. Yerba mate, green tea extract, and kola nuts are also sources of caffeine, and can be found in weight-loss and performance-enhancing dietary supplements. Be sure to read labels for hidden sources of caffeine.

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Dietary supplements: Questions and answers

HPRC Fitness Arena:
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) answers consumers' questions about dietary supplements and the regulations of dietary supplements.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has information for consumers regarding dietary supplements: Questions and answers, regulations, and safety alerts. Click here for their website.

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Food dyes and hyperactivity: Is there a link?

HPRC Fitness Arena:
In the debate over food dyes and hyperactivity in children, the FDA feels there is not enough evidence to support any action.

Red 40, Yellow 5, Yellow 6, and other dyes are artificial colorings allowed in foods in the U.S., yet there is a long-standing debate over whether food dyes contribute to hyperactivity in children. The Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) Food Advisory Committee met the last week of March and determined that there is not enough evidence to support the link between food dyes and hyperactivity in children. For now, there will be no warning labels on food products containing dyes.

FDA Alert: FDA Warns Consumers to Stop Using Soladek Vitamin Solution

HPRC Fitness Arena:
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued a warning about a vitamin solution, Soladek; samples that were tested contained dangerously high levels of vitamins A and D.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued a warning about a vitamin solution, Soladek; samples that were tested contained dangerously high levels of vitamins A and D.  The FDA has advised consumers currently using this product to stop immediately.

For more information, read the FDA warning.

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