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HPRC Fitness Arena: Dietary Supplements

What’s in your supplement safety tool belt?

Filed under: OPSS, Supplements
Not all supplements are dangerous, but are you equipped with the tools to help you determine which ones are?

In the sea of dietary supplements, can you tell which ones are safe to take and which to avoid? Do you often find yourself confused, wondering what you should be looking for in a product? Operation Supplement Safety (OPSS) has you covered. Here are just some of the tools that OPSS provides to help you choose supplements wisely:

  • Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs). HPRC receives hundreds of questions every year, and we’ve put answers to the most frequently asked questions in this section of OPSS. You’ll find information about banned substances in the military, hot-topic dietary supplement ingredients, and more.
  • OPSS Scorecard. The scorecard consists of just 7 questions to show you what to look for on a product label and help you determine if a product is okay or a “no-go.”
  • OPSS High-Risk Supplement List. With HRSL, you can see if a certain dietary supplement product might pose a health or sport anti-doping risk.
  • Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database. NMCD, a partner of HPRC, provides information about the safety and effectiveness of thousands of dietary supplement products and ingredients. And best of all, it’s free to all DoD personnel with a “.mil” email address.

The goal of OPSS is to provide you with the most reliable and relevant information about dietary supplements, but if you can’t find what you’re looking for, send us a question using our Ask the Expert feature.

Imported supplement scams

Filed under: OPSS, Supplements
Products labeled as “natural” aren’t always what they seem.

If you buy dietary supplements at international stores, gas stations, or online, watch out. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) warns consumers about imported dietary supplements and nonprescription drug products, specifically those marketed as “natural.” Just because a product is labeled as “natural” does not necessarily make it safe or effective. In fact, many “natural” products have been found to contain undisclosed chemicals or drugs that can be harmful, and it’s possible that some products contain hidden ingredients that could make you pop hot on a drug test. To learn more, please read FDA’s “Some Imported Dietary Supplements…” Only have a minute? Watch their 60-second video below.

The only way to know if a product actually contains the ingredients listed on the label (and nothing else) is by testing it in a laboratory. Before you buy a dietary supplement, check the label to see if it’s been tested by a third-party organization.

Nootropics on your mind?

If you’re looking for cognitive enhancers or “smart drugs,” you may want to think twice.

Many dietary supplement products are marketed as nootropics—substances intended to improve memory, focus, and overall mental performance. While some products contain vitamins, minerals, and plant-based ingredients, others contain drugs that are not legal dietary supplement ingredients. Read the Operation Supplement Safety (OPSS) FAQ about nootropics to learn more about these products and whether they are safe and effective.

Not all ingredients found in dietary supplements are legal, so read product labels carefully. For more information, visit FDA’s Dietary Supplement Products & Ingredients.

Protect yourself from health fraud

It’s National Consumer Protection Week, a reminder to always be an informed consumer of dietary supplements and other products.

March 6–12 marks National Consumer Protection Week, a campaign that encourages consumers to make informed decisions about the products and services they purchase and avoid getting caught in a scam. Dietary supplements are often marketed with claims that sound too good to be true, so be a savvy consumer and question claims such as “quick fix,” “miracle cure,” and “scientific breakthrough.” If you find a product you believe is falsely advertised/labeled or caused an adverse reaction, report it.

Visit the National Consumer Protection Week website to learn more about how to protect yourself from fraud, not just this week, but every day of the year. Operation Supplement Safety (OPSS) strives to provide the best resources and tools to help you choose supplements wisely. You’ll find even more information and consumer updates about dietary supplements from federal agencies such as the Food and Drug Administration and the Federal Trade Commission, and watch this video from Attorney General Loretta E. Lynch.

Put aside the pills and powders

Think you need that dietary supplement? Think again. National Nutrition Month reminds us to choose real foods first.

March is National Nutrition Month, a good reminder to eat healthfully and choose the best foods to fuel our bodies. This year’s theme is “Savor the Flavor of Eating Right,” which isn’t something we can often say about dietary supplements that come in the forms of pills and powders. If you’re looking for a supplement to lose weight, build muscle, or enhance your performance, HPRC always recommends choosing nutrient-rich foods first. They taste better and are better for you. Use the Operation Supplement Safety (OPSS) “Real Food” poster to see what foods can help you meet your goals.

If you’re still considering dietary supplements, be sure to visit OPSS where you’ll find answers to frequently asked questions, infosheets, videos, and other educational materials to help you make an informed decision. And remember to always talk to your doctor before taking any supplement.

Stimulants—Give your heart a break

Know what’s in your dietary supplement, and if it could affect your heart.

Dietary supplements containing stimulants can negatively affect your heart and increase your risk of an adverse event. Stimulants such as caffeine, yohimbine, and synephrine can cause increased or irregular heart rate and high blood pressure and have been associated with chest pain, stroke, and heart attack. In addition, ingesting stimulants before or during exercise can further increase your risk for such heart problems and lead to potentially worse outcomes.

If you are considering a dietary supplement, it’s important to read the product label carefully, especially if you have a heart condition. There are many different stimulants used as ingredients in dietary supplements, and often products come with a warning. Moreover, stimulants are sometimes contained in a proprietary blend, so you can’t tell from the label exactly how much of each ingredient you would be taking. 

DMAA products persist

HPRC has updated its list of products containing DMAA.

Although DMAA is now illegal as a dietary supplement ingredient, some companies still offer products containing this substance. HPRC’s newest update of “Dietary Supplement Products Containing DMAA” lists those products still being offered on the Internet, as well as products that have disappeared from the market. Before you buy any dietary supplement, check this list and read the label to make sure it doesn’t contain this potentially dangerous ingredient. Based on federal policy, DoD considers such products illegal to use or possess. Don’t risk your health or your military career!

What’s a “new dietary ingredient”?

Some dietary supplements can contain at least one “new dietary ingredient.” If you haven’t heard this term before, you’re not alone.

If a dietary supplement product contains something called a “new dietary ingredient,” manufacturers or distributors must notify the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) before marketing any product that contains the ingredient. Aside from this, FDA doesn’t review or approve dietary supplements before they’re marketed. So what’s a “new dietary ingredient,” what makes it different from other ingredients, and what has to be done before one can be used in dietary supplements? Find out in the OPSS FAQ about new dietary ingredients.

Do you have more questions about other dietary supplement terms, regulations, or policies? Check out the other OPSS FAQs for some answers. If you can’t find what you’re looking for, send us a question using our Ask the Expert feature.

Omega-3s and brain health

Filed under: Diet, Nutrition, Omega-3
Omega-3 fatty acids are important for brain health, but beware of products marketed for concussions or traumatic brain injuries.

Omega-3 fatty acids are important for brain development and function, but they also may help protect against damage from concussions and other traumatic brain injuries (TBIs). Several animal studies have shown that omega-3 supplements given before or after a traumatic event not only reduce the severity of damage in certain parts of the brain but also improve mental performance during recovery. Similar studies haven’t been conducted with humans yet, and although the results of these animal studies are promising, there isn’t enough current evidence to recommend taking omega-3 or fish oil supplements to reduce the risk of or assist in the recovery from concussions or TBIs. In addition, FDA has warned consumers to avoid using products marketed for these purposes. For more information, please read FDA’s Consumer Update.

Although omega-3 supplements haven’t been proven to help with TBIs, omega-3s are still important for your brain, heart, and overall health. It’s best to get your omega-3s from food, but if you choose to take supplements, do so under the supervision of your doctor. For more information on omega-3 supplements, please visit “Omega-3 Supplements: In Depth” from the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health.

Chia seeds and drug testing

Will chia seeds cause a positive drug test? Read more and find out what you really need to avoid.

Chia (Salvia hispanica) seeds are rich in omega-3 fatty acids and fiber. As such, they have become a popular food item, and you can also find chia (seeds and oil) in many dietary supplements marketed to support heart and digestive health. On its own, chia will not produce a positive drug test. However, when you look at ingredient lists on product labels, don’t confuse Salvia hispanica (chia) with Salvia divinorum (Diviner’s sage), which is banned by some services. There are many types of salvia, so please read the OPSS FAQ about salvia for more information. If you’re interested in learning more about chia seeds, visit this webpage from MedlinePlus.

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