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Alerts

FDA advises consumers to stop using any supplement products labeled as OxyElite Pro or VERSA-1. Please see the following advisories: FDA -10/08/13, FDA - 10/11/13 and CDC - 10/08/13.

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Announcements

New article on reporting side effects of supplements
Just published in The New England Journal of Medicine: A recent article brings up dietary supplement issues you need to be aware of and discusses how dietary supplement side effects could be monitored better. A PDF of the April 3rd article is available free online.

3rd International Congress on Soldiers’ Physical Performance
August 18-21, 2014
The ICSPP delivers innovative scientific programming on soldiers’ physical performance with experts from around the world.

DMAA list updated for April 2014

Fueling Performance Photo Campaign
Share photos of how you fuel your performance and be featured on our Facebook page!

Dietary supplement module
Earn continuing education credits (if eligible) for this two-hour online module.

Operation LiveWell

Performance Triad

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HPRC Blog

Welcome to the HPRC Blog. We've got lots of information here, from quick tips to in-depth posts about detailed human performance optimization topics.

HPRC Fitness Arena: Dietary Supplements

Questions about C4 Extreme?

Will C4 Extreme cause you to “pop positive” on a drug test? Read the OPSS FAQ to find out the answer.

HPRC has received many questions about C4 Extreme and whether or not it will result in a positive drug test. We have posted an OPSS FAQ to answer the question. Be sure to check back often as we add answers to other questions about ingredients in performance and weight-loss supplements and how to choose supplements safely. If you have additional questions about a particular dietary supplement ingredient or product, please use our “Ask the Expert” button located on the OPSS home page.

Caffeine in supplements – how much?

Some of the most popular dietary supplements sold on military bases may give inaccurate—or no—information about caffeine content on their labels.

A Military Times article reports on a recent study of more than 30 of the most popular dietary supplements (in capsule form) sold on military bases analyzed to determine their caffeine content. Of the 20 supplements that listed caffeine as an ingredient on their labels, six did not specify the amount. These same six contained high amounts of caffeine (210-310 mg per serving)—three or more times the amount permitted by law in soft drinks. Five others revealed significantly different amounts—some more, some less—than the quantity stated on the product label.

Consuming too much caffeine can result in health issues. And if you don’t know how much is in the supplement you’re taking, it could be easy to overdo it if you also drink coffee or energy drinks. Visit the Operation Supplement Safety (OPSS) FAQ on caffeine for additional information.

Air Force studying caffeinated drinks

Air Force conducting study on 12 bases on the use of caffeinated drinks.

The Air Force is conducting a study on the use of energy drinks among active-duty Air Force personnel and civilians. According to the Army and Air Force Exchange Service (AAFES), Monster Energy was the top-selling cold beverage last year in the AAFES worldwide, and due to continuing concerns about the effects of energy drink consumption, the Air Force has started its own survey that targets 12 bases in Europe and the U.S. For the complete story, read the article in Stars and Stripes.

Relaxation drinks: Problematic for teens?

Are relaxation drinks safe for children and adolescents? Recent reports highlight possible problems.

A number of relaxation beverages have been introduced into the market and are now available to consumers of any age from convenience stores, college campuses, and online vendors. There are recent reports of negative side effects in children and teens from the consumption of these drinks. There are two significant issues with relaxation drinks: First, some of their ingredients, particularly melatonin, have not gone through the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) process required for all food ingredients to be designated as safe or “generally recognized as safe” (GRAS). Second, other ingredients such as valerian and caffeine do not have established serving sizes or doses for this type of use. An additional concern is that it is unknown how ingredients might interact. Parents should be concerned about this.

It also may be hard to tell the difference between these drinks and those that have been recognized as safe because their bottles and labels are sometimes similar. A typical consumer may not realize which drinks contain ingredients that might have negative effects. Therefore it’s important to be aware what is in these drinks and to read all labels carefully. Many of these drinks have warnings on their labels that they are not intended for children. For more information about relaxation drinks, their ingredients, and their effects, check out HPRC’s article. Also, visit OPSS (Operation Supplement Safety) for more information about dietary supplement safety and specific ingredients.

Remember, there’s no magic beverage for relaxing or reducing stress. Instead, address those issues in order to get to the bottom of the stress you or your teen might be experiencing. There are strategies that you or your child can use to relax and de-stress in a healthy way. For even more ideas, visit the stress control section of HPRC’s website.

Energy drinks and service members

Energy drink consumption among service members may lead to sleep issues.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has reported that the consumption of energy drinks by service members can lead to sleep deprivation and impaired performance. The report outlines a study of more than 1,200 service members deployed in Afghanistan that found roughly 45% of those surveyed consumed at least one energy drink daily. Those who consumed three or more energy drinks per day—about 14%—had sleep issues that disrupted their performance. While more research is needed to determine the full effects of energy drink consumption on sleep, service members should be aware of their daily caffeine consumption.

MHS highlights Total Force Fitness

July was the Military Health System’s “Total Fitness Month.” HPRC offers lots of resources to follow up on their recommendations for healthy living.

This past July, the Military Health System focused on promoting Total Force Fitness, giving priority to seven top areas: tobacco-free living, drug-abuse prevention, healthy eating, active living, injury-free and violence-free living, reproductive and sexual health, and mental and emotional well-being. They suggest managing your own health and wellness by making healthy choices between doctor’s visits. For inspirations and ideas that can help, check out HPRC’s ways to:

Operation Supplement Safety (OPSS) has now been launched to answer many of your questions about Dietary Supplements. Visit the OPSS section of HPRC’s website now to learn more!

FDA investigating adverse events linked to energy drinks

Reports of adverse events —including five deaths—possibly linked to Monster Energy drinks are under investigation by the FDA.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is investigating five deaths and a non-fatal heart attack that may be linked to Monster Energy drinks. The FDA has pointed out that while the investigation is going on, it does not mean that Monster Energy drinks caused these adverse events, which were reported to the FDA over a span of eight years. Other adverse event reports have been associated with consuming the energy drinks. Read the New York Times article here, as well as this one from NBC News.

Operation Supplement Safety (OPSS) has now been launched to answer many of your questions about Dietary Supplements. Visit the OPSS section of HPRC’s website now to learn more!

Eat protein-rich foods to save money

If you want to save money while looking for performance nutrition, choose real food over supplements.

Did you know that protein sources such as chicken breast, tuna, and chocolate milk—even at the highest quality and price—cost less than $6 per pound? In contrast, protein supplements (Muscle Milk, whey, soy or casein protein powders, Myoplex, etc.) are usually over $10 a pound. The smart choice seems obvious.

Operation Supplement Safety (OPSS) has now been launched to answer many of your questions about Dietary Supplements. Visit the OPSS section of HPRC’s website now to learn more!

Energy drinks and adolescents

Energy drink use by adolescents is on the rise, and misuse of these beverages may stem from confusion about using energy drinks for rehydration.

Energy drinks are marketed to improve physical and mental performance, mainly to “boost energy.” Adolescents are getting hold of energy drinks more often, in part due to heavy marketing of sports drinks with athletic superstars, causing adolescents to confuse energy drinks for sports drinks. Energy drinks contain large amounts of caffeine and other stimulants, while sports drinks contain carbohydrates and electrolytes and are intended for use when athletes (including adolescents) are engaged in prolonged, vigorous exercise. Adolescents have already had problems combining energy drinks and alcohol, which has led to risky behavior. The American Academy of Pediatrics has guidelines for the use of energy drinks and sports drinks by adolescents.

Operation Supplement Safety (OPSS) has now been launched to answer many of your questions about Dietary Supplements. Visit the OPSS section of HPRC’s website now to learn more!

DMAA list update for October 2012

HPRC’s latest review of DMAA-containing products shows that 89 have been discontinued or reformulated since the list was first compiled nine months ago.

HPRC’s list of DMAA-containing dietary supplement products has been reformatted, revealing that many are no longer being manufactured or distributed. A number of manufacturers now indicate on their websites that products previously containing DMAA have been reformulated. DMAA-containing versions of discontinued or reformulated products are likely to be on the market until retail supplies have been exhausted, so check labels carefully for ingredients. However, the only way to be certain a product no longer contains DMAA is through laboratory testing.

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