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Alerts

FDA warns consumers about caffeine powder. 

FDA advises consumers to stop using any supplement products labeled as OxyElite Pro or VERSA-1. Please see the following advisories: FDA -10/08/13, FDA - 10/11/13 and CDC - 10/08/13.

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Announcements

DMAA list updated for April 2014

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Dietary supplement module
Earn continuing education credits (if eligible) for this two-hour online module.

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HPRC Blog

Welcome to the HPRC Blog. We've got lots of information here, from quick tips to in-depth posts about detailed human performance optimization topics.

HPRC Fitness Arena: Dietary Supplements

DMAA-containing products list updated

HPRC has updated its list of products containing DMAA to help you make informed decisions in buying dietary supplements.

HPRC recently posted a list of dietary supplement products containing DMAA. Since we originally posted this list at the end of December, some changes have occurred that deserve note. Some products are no longer available on the manufacturer’s websites, while others appear to have been reformulated to eliminate DMAA from their recipes. To download the updated list, go to the Dietary Supplements Resources page under the “Resources” tab, or just click on this link to directly access “Dietary Supplement Products Containing DMAA.”

Dietary supplements: What’s in them for you?

HPRC’s new Dietary Supplement Classification System offers information to help you decide whether a dietary supplement can help you reach your performance goals or whether it may have side effects you want to avoid.

What do you put in your body to boost your performance, increase your energy, shed pounds, build muscle, or otherwise supplement your diet? What’s in that drink, pill, or powder? What will it do for you? What will it do to you? Is it worth the risk?

More and more Warfighters are taking dietary supplements, most without being fully informed that some of the ingredients could have harmful side effects. HPRC has just unveiled its Dietary Supplement Classification System to provide this kind of information and help you make informed decisions about a particular supplement. To start exploring this new resource, visit HPRC’s new web pages. If you have a question, contact us via “Ask the Expert.”

FDA Alert: Multiple “tainted’ weight-loss products

Consumers are advised not to purchase or use these 18 weight-loss products, which contain the undeclared drug ingredient sibutramine.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is advising consumers to stop using multiple weight-loss products that contain the undeclared drug ingredient sibutramine, which was removed from the market in 2010 for safety reasons and may present significant risks for those with coronary artery disease and other heart issues. The following 18 products have received FDA Public Notifications advising consumers not to purchase or use any of them:

  • Lose Weight Coffee
  • Dream Body Slimming Capsule
  • Pai You Guo Slim Tea
  • Botanical Slimming
  • Fruit Plant Lossing Fat Capsule
  • Sheng Yuan Fang
  • Acai Berry Soft Gel ABC
  • Tengda
  • PhentraBurn Slimming Capsules
  • Magic Slim Tea
  • Magic Slim Weight Reduction Capsule
  • P57 Hoodia
  • Leisure 18 Slimming Coffee
  • Lishou
  • A-Slim 100% Natural Slimming Capsule
  • Advanced Slim 5
  • Ja Dera 100% Natural Weight Loss Supplement
  • Slender Slim 11

For more information, see the FDA Tainted Weight Loss Products page, and click on a product name under “Public Notifications.”

DMAA-containing products in question

HPRC offers a list of products containing DMAA to help you make informed decisions in buying dietary supplements.

Dietary supplement products containing DMAA have been temporarily removed from military stores by the AAFES, but they are still available on the public retail market. HPRC has prepared a list of many of these products to help you watch for them if you are considering the purchase of dietary supplements. DMAA is found most commonly in products sold for bodybuilding or weight loss, but it can also be found in other performance-enhancing products, as well as in recreational party pills. The list also includes other names for DMAA that may be found on product labels. To download the list, go to the Dietary Supplements Resources page under the “Resources” tab, or just click on this link to directly access “Dietary Supplement Products Containing DMAA.”

Department of Defense removes DMAA-containing dietary supplements from exchanges

HPRC Fitness Arena: Dietary Supplements
DMAA-containing dietary supplements at military exchanges have been temporarily removed from shelves.

Due to concerns about possible serious adverse health effects, the Department of Defense (DoD) has put a medical hold on the sale of weight-loss and bodybuilding products containing 1,3-dimethylamylamine (DMAA), also referred to as methylhexanamine, Geranamine, and geranium oil, extract, or stems and leaves, from military exchanges.

An extensive investigation will take place to determine the safety of DMAA in dietary supplement products, as well as an educational campaign to assist Warfighters and their families in making informed choices.

For more information, please see the Question and Answers fact sheet by the Directorate of Strategic Communications, Office of the Surgeon General.

Products containing DMAA temporarily removed from AAFES stores

The AAFES is pulling products that contain DMAA from its shelves and will no longer see anything with this potentially dangerous substance.

The Army and Air Force Exchange Service (AAFES) has temporarily removed products containing 1,3-dimethylamylamine (DMAA), also referred to as methylhexanamine, Geranamine, and geranium oil, extract, or stems and leaves from its stores. DMAA is increasingly being associated with serious adverse events. For additional information about the recent AAFES decision, read the Stars and Stripes article. We have also put together a list of products containing DMAA carried by AAFES for your information.

A list of products containing DMAA carried by AAFES (to include GNC) includes:

USPlabs Jack3d (Tropical Fruit and Lemon Lime)

USPlabs OxyELITE Pro

Nutrex Research Lipo-6 Black (his and hers)

Nutrex Research Lipo-6 Black Ultra Concentrate (his and hers)

Nutrex Research Hemo-Rage Black Powder, Punch, Berry

iSatori PWR

Muscletech NeuroCore

Muscletech HydroxyStim

Fahrenheit Nutrition Lean EFX

Muscle Warfare Napalm

SNI Nitric Blast

BIORhythm SSIN Juice

MuscleMeds Code Red

SEI MethylHex 4,2

Gaspari Nutrition Spirodex

Products containing DMAA gone from AAFES stores

The AAFES is pulling products that contain DMAA from its shelves and will no longer sell anything with this potentially dangerous substance.

The Army and Air Force Exchange Service (AAFES) has banned the sale of products containing 1,3-dimethylamylamine (DMAA), also referred to as methylhexanamine, Geranamine, and geranium oil, extract, or stems and leaves. All products containing DMAA have been pulled from store shelves. DMAA is increasingly being associated with serious adverse events. For additional information about the recent AAFES decision, read the Stars and Stripes article.

Energy drinks are really stimulant drinks

Energy drinks contain stimulants; learn how to identify potentially harmful ingredients.

Do you really know what’s in that energy drink? There are different forms of stimulants in energy drinks, many of which are prohibited.  The United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) has put together an information sheet on these “stimulant drinks,” including a helpful example of an ingredient label.

Get the latest scoop on multivitamins

New multivitamins/minerals fact sheets for consumers and health professionals are now available from the Office of Dietary Supplements.

The Office of Dietary Supplements has released new fact sheets on multivitamin/mineral supplements. The QuickFacts version was designed for consumers; health professionals and those who want to know more can get additional detailed information from the Fact Sheet.

The Paleo Diet: Implications for the athlete

The Paleo Diet is based on what hunters/gatherers ate during the Paleolithic Era. But how might this affect athletes today?

The Paleo Diet, also known as the Paleolithic or Caveman Diet, is based on the notion that by consuming what humans ate during the Paleolithic Era—wild animals, plants, eggs, tree nuts, vegetables, roots, fruits, and berries—we will be healthier, have lower disease risk, and live longer. Hunters/gatherers during that time had to rely on what was available and had no agriculture. But what are the implications of this type of diet for the athlete, let alone the average individual?

Foods that were grown and introduced after the Agricultural Revolution (roughly 10,000 years ago) are not allowed in the Paleo Diet. That means dairy and dairy products, grains, and legumes (beans, peas, and lentils) are excluded. Proponents of the Paleo Diet believe that we are “genetically programmed” to follow the diet of the hunters/gatherers. A specific book has been written for athletes who want to follow this diet, which accommodate athletes by allowing some carbohydrates: The authors present five stages of eating for the athlete to follow, based on the glycemic index (GI; how quickly food raises blood glucose levels). The stages are: (1) eating before exercise, (2) during exercise, (3) and 30 minutes after exercise, and (4) during post-exercise extended recovery and (5) long-term recovery. Low- to moderate-GI carbohydrates are recommended at least two hours prior to exercise. Sports drinks or high-GI carbohydrates are recommended for exercise lasting longer than 60 minutes. Immediately after exercise a recovery drink with carbohydrate and protein in a 4:1 to 5:1 ratio is recommended. Stage IV recovery foods (extended recovery) should be a 4:1 to 5:1 carbohydrate-to-protein ratio, with carbohydrates such as raisins, potatoes, sweet potatoes, and yams. Stage V recommends focusing on eating from the main Paleo Diet, with carbohydrates coming from fruits and vegetables. So one could argue that the Paleo Diet for Athletes is like most diets for athletes in that it requires carbohydrates. However, the Paleo Diet for Athletes is higher in protein and fat and lower in carbohydrates than what is recommended for athletes by most health professionals.

What we do know from scientific research is that carbohydrates provide the energy needed for endurance and resistance training, competitive athletic events, mental agility, and healthy living. Complex carbohydrates such as fruits, vegetables, whole-grain pasta, rice and grains, beans, and other legumes contribute to an overall healthy eating plan. By limiting consumption of some of these to only a brief time after exercise, the athlete runs the risk of not having enough fuel for the body, so the body will use protein for energy. Low-fat dairy products also contribute to a healthy lifestyle, providing much-needed calcium and vitamin D as well as probiotics. The Paleo Diet eliminates dairy entirely, even for athletes.

We also know from the scientific literature that during the post-exercise period, within roughly 30-45 minutes of exercise, eating a carbohydrate/protein snack, generally with a 3:1 carbohydrate-to-protein ratio, is essential to stimulate re-synthesis of muscle proteins and replenish glycogen (the storage form of carbohydrate). It doesn’t stop there: It is important to maintain glycogen levels in the muscle and liver to sustain all activities, especially over the course of several days. Eating high-carbohydrate snacks between training sessions is important to replenish glycogen stores. Carbohydrate intake recommendations for athletes are 6 to 10 g/kg body weight per day, or roughly 55% of daily calories from carbohydrates.

What’s the bottom line? Grains and dairy products are staples of modern-day society and provide essential nutrients to an overall healthy diet. By eliminating one or more food groups, you run the risk of missing important nutrients. And can we really eat as humans did during the Paleolithic era? Their life expectancy was about one quarter to one half of what ours is, and we benefit from research showing that eating a variety of foods over the course of time provides us with energy and the important vitamins and minerals needed to sustain us in daily activities and exercise.