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Welcome to the HPRC Blog. We've got lots of information here, from quick tips to in-depth posts about detailed human performance optimization topics.

HPRC Fitness Arena: Environment

New Army uniforms will do a better job protecting soldiers from what bugs them

HPRC Fitness Arena: Environment, Total Force Fitness
The Army will soon begin issuing Fire Resistant combat uniforms treated with the insect repellent permethrin.

Before the end of October of 2012, the Army will issue to all soldiers fire-resistant ACUs that have been factory treated with an EPA-approved insect repellent called permethrin. This method may be a cleaner and safer way of repelling insects compared to DEET, another long-lasting insect repellent. The Army has been using permethrin for nearly 20 years in the form of liquid or spray, and by treating ACUs, soldiers will experience better, longer-lasting protection against ticks, fleas, mosquitos, and other insects that carry diseases such as malaria, West Nile virus, and Lyme. Other advantages include not having to worry about remembering to apply insect repellant and whether you’re applying it correctly. Uniforms treated with permethrin have been used by the Marine Corps since 2007 and have been used in some Iraq and Afghanistan operations but until now have not been available to all soldiers. The new ACUs will be good for about 50 launderings, but it is important to note that the uniforms should be washed separately from other clothing. There will be a permethrin-free ACU available for those with medical conditions, including pregnant women, who should not wear the treated uniforms. For more information check out these FAQs or contact the Armed Forces Pest Management Board.

A new approach to prevent non-combat injuries

The heavy loads that active duty service men and women have to carry during deployments and training are taking a toll. Extensive research continues on how to reduce body armor weight and decrease the risk of associated non-combat injuries.

Body armor, in addition to necessary equipment and supplies, well exceeds the recommended carrying maximum of 50 pounds. The DoD was asked by Congress to conduct a research project to explore the possibility of lightening body armor without sacrificing protection. Currently, the research shows it does not seem possible to make body armor out of a lighter material while still adequately protecting the individual. However, leaders are taking a more preventative approach to reducing injuries on the battlefield. These include changes in pre-deployment training, as well as an increased number of deployed physical and occupational therapists and improvements in forward-deployed care centers.

F-22 jets under fire

HPRC Fitness Arena: Environment, Total Force Fitness
On September 13, Air Force officials met on Capitol Hill to address the House Armed Services Committee over concerns about the physiological dangers of flying F-22s.

Why has the F-22 Raptor been depriving its pilots of oxygen for the last 12 years? Air Force officials recently told a House subcommittee hearing (a complete video of the two-hour hearing is also available) that they don’t know what’s behind the dizziness, confusion, blackouts, memory loss, fatigue, and eventually chronic cough (“Raptor cough”) that pilots experience while flying the stealth jets. After more than a dozen incidents between 2000 and 2011—and one fatal crash—where pilots were being choked by the plane, the Air Force’s entire F-22 fleet was grounded in May 2011.

Investigations ruled out low blood sugar and dehydration as possible causes of the symptoms and eventually concluded that the problem was an overinflated pressure vest that restricted breathing.

In response, a team of NASA engineers and Navy divers developed a new-and-improved pressure suit and back-up oxygen systems and removed a faulty charcoal air filter. These measures seem to have alleviated the problems—a dozen F-22s recently were deployed to Japan without incident. Now restrictions are being lifted, although the jets and their pilots are being closely monitored. Pilots currently must operate under altitude ceilings so that they don’t need to use the flight vests, and they must also stay close to emergency landing sites. Experts and scientists continue to investigate the primary cause of these incidents as well as improve safety and back-up systems.

Sensors and smartphones may help save lives

HPRC Fitness Arena: Environment, Total Force Fitness
 Early detection of blood loss and other medical conditions can help save lives. New technology combined with smartphones may be the new way medics respond to emergencies on the battlefield.

Developing technology in order to save the lives of those who serve is vitally important. To that end, Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) recently received a $1.5 million grant from the U.S. Army to develop monitoring sensors that will be able to detect blood loss early, which may help save lives on the battlefield. WPI will partner with the University of Massachusetts Medical School to create wireless sensors that can be worn on the body to detect blood loss, body movement, and posture. They will also be working to combine that information with smartphone technology that medics can use as a handheld diagnostic device in rapid-response situations.

Performance Quote: Bend with the wind

"Animated growth, like trees, never proceeds in straight lines. Trees are not like the walls of a house, they adjust to the living conditions of wind, sun, soil, and rain." - Ruth Cohn, noted psychotherapist

"Animated growth, like trees, never proceeds in straight lines. Trees are not like the walls of a house, they adjust to the living conditions of wind, sun, soil, and rain." - Ruth Cohn, noted psychotherapist

Whether it is environmental challenges (heat, cold, altitude) or psychological pressure, adjusting your performance strategies to your surroundings is the only way to ensure success. There will be situations that may seem impossible to overcome, but that is when you must dig deep and use whatever resources you have available. Enhance your performance by challenging yourself at every opportunity. Visit HPRC’s Environment and Mind Tactics sections to learn strategies on how to best adapt to different situations.

New face paint does more than camouflage

HPRC Fitness Arena: Environment, Total Force Fitness
New face paint is being tested and hopefully will be approved for the military in the near future. Not only will it hide soldiers’ faces from the enemy, but it will also shield their faces from the extreme temperatures of bomb blasts.

Face paint has been used for many decades to blend the appearance of Warfighters’ exposed skin into their environments and protect them from the enemy. The American Chemical Society is taking a new approach to the traditional camouflage face paint by making it from a material that also can provide some protection from the heat wave of roadside bombs, IEDs, and other explosions on the battlefield. Thermal blasts last only a few seconds, but can cook the face, hands, and other exposed skin. The new face paint will protect exposed skin against temperatures reaching around 600 degrees Fahrenheit, for up to 60 seconds. The paint even incorporates the insect repellent DEET in a form that will not catch fire.

This new face paint is still in the testing stages, but already there are plans for a colorless form for use by men and women in other occupations—such as firefighters and other emergency responders—who are at risk of extreme heat exposure.

Defining “heat illness”

HPRC Fitness Arena: Environment, Total Force Fitness
At some point, you’ll be required to perform in a hot environment, whether it’s on a mission or for the PRT. When you do, be on the lookout for signs and symptoms of progressing heat illness.

Heat illness is a hot topic for the military. Did you know there is a spectrum of conditions that fall under the term “heat illness,” some more severe than others? HPRC has great resources on how to prepare for exposure to hot environments and how to prevent heat illness. Read HPRC’s Answer to “What IS heat illness?” for more about what heat illness is and how to identify the signs that you might be developing more serious conditions.

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Can You Hear Me? An Introduction to Hearing Loss Prevention

HPRC Fitness Arena: Environment, Total Force Fitness
An CDC educational webinar covers the causes of noise- and music-related hearing loss and how to prevent it.

On September 11, join an online webinar, Can You Hear Me? An Introduction to Hearing Loss Prevention, sponsored by the CDC, to discuss the primary causes of hearing loss, and learn how to prevent it. This educational event is free; however, there are a limited number of open lines, so log in early.

Xena: Warrior Princess inspires new body armor

HPRC Fitness Arena: Environment, Total Force Fitness
Congress has directed the Pentagon to develop better-fitting body armor for female soldiers after a decade of women fighting on the front lines.

Although the military does not allow women to take part in direct combat, they routinely face the dangers of war. The Pentagon was recently pressed to develop better-fitting body armor for female soldiers, recognizing that men and women have different body shapes. Women have more curves, shorter torsos, and narrower shoulders than most of their male counterparts. The current male-based body armor creates gaps and additional pressure points that leaves service women vulnerable and reduces their performance (aiming a weapon, entering and exiting vehicles, etc).

Engineers are looking to create plates that conform to the female body, similar to the armor worn by TV’s popular Xena: Warrior Princess. There are some concerns regarding weight and protection, but so far the Army has tested eight sizes, with positive feedback from women Warfighters.

New Army camouflage: the end of the digital age?

HPRC Fitness Arena: Environment, Total Force Fitness
Since 2004, Army personnel have donned the Universal Camouflage Pattern on standard uniforms; but new research and field reports have found this pattern to be ineffective in combat.

In 2004, the U.S. Army digitized its former camouflage pattern on standard issue uniforms. It was termed “Universal Camouflage Pattern,” or UCP, with the hope that it would serve as a one-print-fits-all for any environment. The theory behind the digital print was not the result of a fashion craze; it started in the late 1970s with two psychology professors at West Point. Neuroscientists divided the human visual system into two parallel circuits. One circuit told us where objects were located, the other what objects were. Officially called the “Dual Texture Gradient,” the idea was that the pixelated pattern would interfere with those circuits and make it difficult to identify objects. More research, based on how our brains processed MRI scans as boxes and rectangles, led camouflage experts to similar conclusions, that this pattern was smart camo. Initially, the Marines adopted the pattern from the Canadians. However, the pattern failed early trials in the U.S. Army, and troops reported that it performed poorly in combat.

In 2009, after a camo detection study, the Army revised the design for ground troops in Afghanistan to the current “MultiCam” pattern as a temporary solution. Currently, four designs from non-government vendors are in a bid to become the next camo pattern. Submissions required that designs include a woodland variant, a desert variant, and a transitional variant for every environment in between. The goal of extensive field tests will be to optimize performance range from 35-400 meters in a woodland environment and 35-500 meters in a transitional and desert environment. Testing of the first pattern, which resembles reptile skin, began in June. Testing of the other patterns could last up to nine months, and production of the new uniforms could begin as early as 2013.

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