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HPRC Fitness Arena: Family & Relationships

How are you at handling criticism?

Maybe you can dish it out, but can you take it?

You’ve heard the expression about being able to dish it out, but not being able to take it. Is there some truth to that? Being on the receiving end of criticism can be difficult, especially in a close relationship, and can provoke anger. If you think that avoiding, denying, making excuses, or fighting back are the best ways to handle criticism, take note of how many times those tactics have made it worse instead. The next time you feel criticized, try this: Listen to what is being said, ask for details, agree with your critic’s right to his or her opinion, and use the criticism as a learning opportunity. If you need time to think about what they are saying or to calm down, saying “Let me think about it” might be a good way to get some space.

Activities help kids during times of deployment

Children feel lots of different things while their parent is deployed. There are organizations that can help kids through physical activity, peer mentoring, and other social gatherings.

Having something to keep children’s minds and bodies busy can make time pass faster and give them a sense of pride while their mom or dad is away. There are various organizations to help support children of deployed parents and keep them active and involved in their community. The U.S. Army has Operation Military Kid, which connects families to local resources to achieve a sense of community. Our Military Kids specifically reaches out to dependents of the National Guard, reservists, and active-duty wounded warriors. The Department of Defense has a new campaign, Operation Live Well, which includes resources to keep military children active and resilient during their guardian’s deployments. There are also numerous non-profit organizations that offer programming for military children—check out the National Resource Directory section for children’s programs near you.

Still too fat to fight

Retired military leaders are taking a stand against childhood obesity as a matter of national security and military readiness.

In the war against childhood obesity, senior military leaders are taking a stand in the name of national security. The retired generals and admirals of “Mission: Readiness” are doing their part to combat childhood obesity by calling on Congress to remove junk food and high-calorie drinks from schools by adopting the Institute of Medicine standards for what can be served in schools, increasing funding for more nutritious meals, and supporting the development of public health interventions. The group is concerned that current school policies and lack of high nutritional standards are leading to unhealthy food choices in the form of vending machine snacks and sugary drinks. As much as 40% of children’s caloric intake occurs at school, so clearly schools have an important role to play. Retired U.S. Army General Johnnie E. Wilson points out that “We need America’s service members to be in excellent physical condition because they have such an important job to do.” The most recent report by the Mission: Readiness organization estimates that 27% of young Americans are still too fat to fight and not healthy enough to serve their country. In an analysis of military standards, being overweight was the leading medical reason for being rejected from the military between 1995 and 2008. While these military leaders may be fighting for your kids, the real battle begins at home. Encourage healthy eating and lifestyle behaviors by staying fit as a family.

Ready, set, play!

Childhood obesity is a fast-growing issue in the United States. Preventing it can be a fun family affair!

Chubby cheeks on little ones are cute, but you want your child to outgrow them. The number of obese and overweight children has almost tripled since 1980, resulting in an increase in cardiovascular disease and other health issues—a trend reflected in the body-fat condition of today’s military trainees. Doing activities as a family not only gets kids moving, but also gets you moving! Children need at least 60 minutes a day of play involving moderate to vigorous exercise. This can be done throughout the day— at recess, during after school activities, playing at home—and doesn’t have to be done all at once. Let’s Move! has a list of simple steps you can do to encourage your child to live a healthy lifestyle. One idea: Have a house rule of doing jumping jacks during television commercials. For even more ideas, check out the CDC’s Strategies and Solutions for parents and communities.

An APP for family activities

HPRC Fitness Arena: Family & Relationships
DCoE has developed an app for Android that can help you find fun things to do with family and friends.

Are you interested in ideas for activities with a positive bent for your family and friends? There’s  an app for that—Positive Activity Jackpot—currently available for Android. The DCoE’s National Center for Telehealth and Technology has developed a free app that helps you find nearby activities and fun things to do with your family and friends. It also lets you invite people from your contacts list so they can join in the fun.

Comprehensive Soldier AND Family Program

The Army’s CSF resilience-enhancement program is now CSF2, which includes training for and by spouses.

The Army has changed the name of its Comprehensive Soldier Fitness program—its new name is Comprehensive Soldier & Family Fitness – CSF2. The resilience-enhancement program now includes spouses and allows them to be trained and serve as Master Resilience Trainers (MRTs). In CSF2, spouses can attend a 10-day, 80-hour course—the same program as for soldiers—and then can go on to help train other spouses in resilience and psychological health.

HPRC’s new Performance Strategy on couples communication

HPRC offers a set of strategies you can put to work on improving communication with your “significant other.”

Have you ever wondered what a truly healthy relationship looks like? Did you know some arguments can be healthy? And are you curious as to what the difference is between a healthy argument and an unhealthy one? If you are, you’ll want to check out HPRC’s Performance Strategy on couples communication that highlights strategies you can instantly apply to your relationships.

Fun activities for single Warfighters

Military facilities offer lots of options for family activities, but there are programs for single Warfighters too.

Earlier this summer we highlighted a couple of military family programs for Warfighters and their family members. Did you know there are also programs for single Warfighters with the goal of enhancing morale and promoting fun, recreational activities?

The Army has the Better Opportunities for Single Soldiers (BOSS) program, which is open to all services, National Guardsmen, Reservists and Department of Defense civilians; the Navy has its Liberty Program, the Marines have the Single Marine Program (SMP), and the Air Force has the Single Airman Initiative Program (SAP). For more information, check out The Real Warriors campaign’s website, which describes these programs in more detail.

Single service member programs could be a great way to expand your social circle and have fun.

Strength training for children and teens

Resistance training has become popular among children and teens. When performed in a safe, structured environment, this type of exercise can be very beneficial for improving their health and athletic performance.

At some point or another, your child or teen might pick up those dumbbells you have lying around the house. They’ve seen you lift weights as part of your regular exercise routine and decided they want to get stronger too. But you might wonder if strength training is safe for your kids.

Lifting the size weights you use might be too much for kids and teens, but in general strength training (also referred to as resistance training) can be a safe and healthy way to improve muscular fitness for children and teens, starting as early as seven or eight years old, when their coordination skills have developed enough. The goal should be improving muscular fitness while having fun and learning effective training methods.

As a parent you need to make sure your kids are supervised and receiving age-appropriate and skilled instructions in order to reduce the risk of injury. With proper technique and safe practices, strength training is not dangerous for growing bodies. However, light weights, exercise bands, or your child’s own body weight should be used to build his or her strength. Currently, there are no specific guidelines for exactly how much lifting they should do. However, according to the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) one to three sets of six to 15 repetitions, two to three times per week is considered reasonable.

Resistance training is not the same as bodybuilding, weightlifting, or powerlifting, which are associated with competition, high intensity, and maximum weights. The American Academy of Pediatrics and ACSM are opposed to children using these methods or the use of "one-rep-max" (a method sometimes used to assess strength) due to the increased risk for injury.

While a medical examination is not mandatory, it is recommended for children who want to begin a strength-training program. And remember that strength training is something you can do with your children. Family fitness is a great way to keep you and your child healthy and active while you spend quality time together.

Late night studying is not worth passing up quality sleep time

Help your children optimize their learning by making sure they get enough sleep instead of cramming.

For many students, sleep is often sacrificed for studying. If it comes down to one or the other, sleep may be the better choice. According to a 2012 study, when students sacrificed sleep for studying, it was harder for them to pay attention in class and perform well on tests or assignments the following day. Warfighters are students too, as they often have to learn on the job. So help yourself and your children to optimize learning by optimizing sleep! Check out HPRC’s “Sleep Optimization” section and articles in response to “Questions from the Field” about sleep for ideas about how to do so.

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