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Alerts

RegenESlim Appetite Control Capsules voluntarily recalled due to the presence of DMAA.

FDA warns consumers about caffeine powder. 

FDA advises consumers to stop using any supplement products labeled as OxyElite Pro or VERSA-1. Please see the following advisories: FDA -10/08/13, FDA - 10/11/13 and CDC - 10/08/13.

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Announcements

New article on reporting side effects of supplements
Just published in The New England Journal of Medicine: A recent article brings up dietary supplement issues you need to be aware of and discusses how dietary supplement side effects could be monitored better. A PDF of the April 3rd article is available free online.

3rd International Congress on Soldiers’ Physical Performance
August 18-21, 2014
The ICSPP delivers innovative scientific programming on soldiers’ physical performance with experts from around the world.

DMAA list updated for April 2014

Fueling Performance Photo Campaign
Share photos of how you fuel your performance and be featured on our Facebook page!

Dietary supplement module
Earn continuing education credits (if eligible) for this two-hour online module.

Operation LiveWell

Performance Triad

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Welcome to the HPRC Blog. We've got lots of information here, from quick tips to in-depth posts about detailed human performance optimization topics.

HPRC Fitness Arena: Family & Relationships

HPRC at the 2012 Warrior Resilience Conference

This year’s Warrior Resilience Conference focused on the family and social aspects of Total Force Fitness.

The 2012 Warrior Resilience Conference in March highlighted the importance of the “social domain” to Total Force Fitness. The social domain was defined as relationships in the unit, and family (immediate and extended family and friends). “Family fitness” was defined as the family’s use of physical, psychological, and spiritual resources to prepare, adapt, and grow in challenging times.

The conference was geared towards the line and focused on teaching skills and strategies that participants can instantly apply in their units and families and to bolster individual resilience. The conference highlighted skills that Warfighters and family members are already “bringing to the fight,” how to use them in new ways, and how to add new ones from a holistic perspective. Skills from military programs such as FOCUS, Comprehensive Soldier Fitness, and Combat Operational Stress Control (COSC) were taught in breakout sessions along with information on family physical fitness and nutritional strategies.

HPRC is following up with many of the presenters to see if we can provide their information on the HPRC website, so keep an eye on our Family and Relationships section.

Tips for parents to help children and teens with deployment: Week 5

Look at deployment and reintegration as times of family strength and growth to help you and your children weather the changes gracefully.

In this fifth and final week of strategies you can use to help your children and teens weather the deployment of a parent, we take a look at how you can use the experience to strengthen your family.

Week #5 tips: Honor the family strengths.

  • Deployment and reintegration can be times of family strength and growth. Look at these as opportunities to practice new roles and routines that can be helpful as your family adapts to the challenges of deployment and reintegration.
  • Recognize the growth of your adolescent when you return from your deployment. Many teens feel like they’ve matured during their parent’s absence and feel hurt when this goes unacknowledged. In fact, acknowledging and communicating growth and transformations for each member of the family can be a great family activity to build positive relationships.

Tips for parents to help children and teens with deployment: Week 4

Tips for parents to use during reintegration to help children and teenagers

Children grow and change over the course of a deployment, and service members can sometimes miss events and milestones. Here are some practical strategies you can keep in mind during reintegration to help your children and teenagers.

Week #4 tips: Strategies you can use during reintegration.

  • When a deployed parent returns, slowly transition the roles and responsibilities of each family member at home, but don’t forget the individual needs of each person as well as the family as a whole.
  • Let your children know that you love them unconditionally, but still provide clear expectations and boundaries.
  • Brainstorm a list of fun activities to do as a family.
  • Devote one-on-one time with each child when you return home in order to get reacquainted with your children.
  • Demonstrate how to cope well with emotions. For example, children can be taught emotion management. One tool is called a “feeling thermometer.” Family members can monitor and control their feelings using the picture of a temperature thermometer to manage stress when the temperature is too high.

Tips for parents to help children and teens with deployment: Week 3

Strategies for helping your teenager cope with deployment include keeping the lines open.

This week we offer some practical strategies to help you to keep the lines of communication open with your teens about deployment and post-deployment reintegration.

Week #3 tips: Maintain open communication with your teenager.

  • The most important strategy to use especially with teens is to maintain open communication about concerns, emotions, and questions.
  • Encourage your teens and children to speak out about their thoughts and feelings to their loved ones. It not only helps manage their emotions, but it also helps foster closer family relationships.
  • Stay close to your teen or child while you are deployed using the technology they love: smartphones, Twitter, Facebook, email, etc.
  • Reinforce your teenager’s growing autonomy while you rebuild and maintain your relationship in new and flexible ways. Let your teen choose how much he or she wants to stay in touch; take a hint from how—and how often—they respond to you reaching out.
  • You also can encourage your teens and children to create a “scrapbook” of videos, pictures, stories, and relevant events that took place while their parent was deployed so experiences can be shared during and after deployment.

    March is National Nutrition Month

    The FDA is using National Nutrition Month to remind Americans they can use the Nutrition Facts labels on food and drinks to make healthier choices.

    The goal of National Nutrition Month is to remind Americans to eat healthy and choose foods with good nutrition. The FDA’s theme for 2012 is “Remember to Use the Nutrition Facts Label.” One tool you can use to help make good food choices is the Nutrition Facts label that appears on all packaged foods and beverages. To learn how to read labels, visit the FDA’s web page “Nutrition Facts Label Programs and Materials.”

    Tips for parents to help children and teens with deployment: Week 2

    More strategies you can use to help your child or teen cope throughout the deployment cycle.

    Here are some additional practical strategies and tips you as a parent can use to help your children and teens cope with deployment and the post-deployment reintegration process.

    Week #2 tips: Easing deployment and reintegration

    • Before deployment: If you’re being deployed, try recording your own audio books so your child can listen to your voice during your deployment. This also will help your child stay connected to you by continuing family routines such as reading before bed.
    • During deployment: Depending on their age, kids don’t understand timeframes as well as adults do. If you continue to remind them of future plans during and after the deployed parent’s return, it will help them deal with the separation and reunion.
    • Try referring to the deployed parent’s absence as work instead of just saying that he or she is gone. This helps children realize that the absent parent didn’t simply choose to leave them, which could make for a better reunion.
    • Before the deployed parent returns, talk about what issues to address when he or she does. And plan activities you can share together.
    • Throughout the deployment cycle: Be aware of mental health symptoms for children of all ages. If needed, join your children or teenagers in group counseling; it can be a helpful forum where everyone can discuss experiences, feelings, and thoughts.

        Tips for parents to help children and teens with deployment: Week 1

        Try talking to your child or teen about their deployment experiences for optimal family performance over the long run.

        Many children and teenagers born and raised in military families learn to adapt to their parent’s deployment and return and become more resilient as a result. However, no family is immune to stress. Learning what strategies work best for your family—and each family member—is important for optimal performance over the long run.

        Over the next five weeks, HPRC will suggest some practical strategies that you can use as a parent to help your children and teens to cope with deployment and post-deployment reintegration.

        Week #1 tips: Try talking with your child about any phase of deployment.

        • Help your children stay in touch with their deployed parent—whether through phone calls, videos, or email. Keeping the absent parent up-to-date with events on the home front helps make the homecoming easier.
        • Talk about changes that occur during deployment. If your child doesn’t want to talk, encourage expression through playing or drawing.
        • Allow and encourage your children to ask any questions they may have regarding deployment—before, during, and after—and give them open, honest, and age-appropriate answers.

        New One Shot One Kill materials now available online

        New program materials for the One Shot One Kill (OSOK) performance enhancement program are now available on HPRC’s website!

        One Shot One Kill: Want to learn how the elite warrior accomplishes optimal performance time after time, under the most challenging conditions? The HPRC now has new program materials for the One Shot One Kill (OSOK) performance enhancement program online for you to use and download—by yourself or with your unit! One Shot One Kill (Integrative Platform version) is a “warrior-centric” performance enhancement program that warriors can set up and manage on their own. OSOK-IP is designed to enhance performance, hardiness, and resilience. By building on the skills that Warfighters already possess, OSOK aims to translate good Warfighter qualities to outstanding ones. OSOK-IP comes in two versions:

        OSOK-IP Solo is a step-by-step integrative training plan, with supplemental materials, that enables the individual Warfighter to pursue this method of Total Fitness on his or her own and reach the optimal level of performance in almost all areas of life.

        OSOK-IP Train the Trainer enables your unit to train as a group by selecting one member to learn and present OSOK-IP to the rest of the unit. This section of the website has the full curriculum available to download and even customize OSOK-IP content for your own military culture and unit.

        We look forward to your feedback, too. Check out OSOK and let us know what you think!

        Working out with babies

        An Army base in Germany includes babies in their workouts!

        At the U.S. Army Garrison in Kaiserslautern (Germany), the base is trying to find more ways to include families in physical fitness. They are providing classes— called “Binkies and Babes” —that spouses can do with their babies. These classes are great ways for spouses to workout with their young children, socialize with other military families, and get a great individual workout!

        Overseas military families can sometimes find it difficult to both exercise and manage child care. This is one way overseas bases are moving towards Total Family Fitness. Renee Champagne, the Fitness Coordinator for the Army bases in Germany (and a military spouse herself), sees how “working out and staying physically fit may help a spouse cope during a deployment… which in turn could provide peace of mind to the military member downrange.”

        For more information, see the article and video on Stars and Stripes.

        Announcing a new section on family nutrition

        HPRC's Family & Relationships domain has a new section on family nutrition. Check it out!

        Learn how to make healthy choices about nutrition and physical fitness with information you and your family can instantly apply. HPRC's Family & Relationships section has a new area on family nutrition where you can find tips on how to help yourself and those around you—your parents, children, spouse, and friends—build and maintain healthy food habits. Find more information on interactive tools, family meal planning, military resources, and research findings.

        Check it out!