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Alerts

FDA warns consumers about caffeine powder. 

FDA advises consumers to stop using any supplement products labeled as OxyElite Pro or VERSA-1. Please see the following advisories: FDA -10/08/13, FDA - 10/11/13 and CDC - 10/08/13.

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Announcements

New article on reporting side effects of supplements
Just published in The New England Journal of Medicine: A recent article brings up dietary supplement issues you need to be aware of and discusses how dietary supplement side effects could be monitored better. A PDF of the April 3rd article is available free online.

3rd International Congress on Soldiers’ Physical Performance
August 18-21, 2014
The ICSPP delivers innovative scientific programming on soldiers’ physical performance with experts from around the world.

DMAA list updated for April 2014

Fueling Performance Photo Campaign
Share photos of how you fuel your performance and be featured on our Facebook page!

Dietary supplement module
Earn continuing education credits (if eligible) for this two-hour online module.

Operation LiveWell

Performance Triad

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Welcome to the HPRC Blog. We've got lots of information here, from quick tips to in-depth posts about detailed human performance optimization topics.

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition

FDA’s warning on caffeine powder

FDA issues a warning about caffeine powder and advises consumers to avoid powdered pure caffeine.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is warning consumers about powdered pure caffeine, particularly as sold in bulk on the Internet. At least one death has been associated with the use of such products, and FDA advises consumers about the potency of powdered pure caffeine. See FDA’s Consumer Advice, which includes information about how to report an adverse event.

According to this consumer resource from FDA, you should limit your caffeine intake to just 100–200 mg per day (about 5–10 ounces of coffee). Taking large doses of caffeine—roughly 400–500 mg—at one time can result in a serious condition known as “caffeine intoxication.” Some symptoms of caffeine intoxication are minor and include nausea, vomiting, agitation, nervousness, or headache. Other symptoms can be more life-threatening, such as rapid heartbeat, electrolyte imbalance, very high blood sugar, or high levels of acid in the blood, which can cause seizures. See the OPSS FAQ to help you avoid hidden sources of caffeine. 

Omega-3 fatty acids in food

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
Filed under: Nutrition, Omega-3
What is the best source of omega-3 fatty acids besides salmon?

Omega-3 fatty acids make up a family of polyunsaturated fatty acids. They are important to our health, and since our bodies can’t make them, we need to obtain them from the foods we eat. Omega-3 fatty acids may reduce the risk of heart disease and play an important role in our cell membranes. So, eating more can benefit the body in many ways.

The most widely available dietary source of EPA and DHA is cold-water oily fish such as salmon, herring, mackerel, anchovies, and sardines. Other oily fish such as tuna also contains omega-3 fatty acids but in lesser amounts. Some other sources of ALA are walnuts and canola, soybean, flaxseed/linseed, and olive oils. For additional information, including health benefits of omega-3 fatty acids, read this fact sheet; and for omega-3 content in various foods, try this infosheet from HPRC.

Performance Triad app – (down)load and go!

Filed under: Apps, Performance
The new Performance Triad app provides important information on sleep, activity, and nutrition to help you stay ready and resilient.

If you’re looking for the latest information on how to improve your sleep, activity, and nutrition, you can find it with the new app for the Performance Triad, an initiative of the U.S. Army Surgeon General. The Performance Triad, which includes technological tools and resources, was rolled out to optimize performance for individuals and units—and ultimately to maximize readiness and resilience. The app is available for free and is available in versions for iPhone, Android, and Windows. Whether you’re a healthcare professional, active duty, spouse, or civilian, you’ll be able to find useful information tailored to you! The app provides tips on how to sleep well, stay active, and eat right. Whether you’re on the go or looking for quick answers, you’ll have lots of great information at your fingertips. This app will be updated frequently, so be sure to keep your eye on it for new information!

How to eat for endurance events

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
Eating right goes hand-in-hand with preparing for an endurance event such as a marathon. Learn more about nutrition for endurance events.

Training for a marathon or some other endurance event? Building your endurance—by making the right nutrition choices—can make the difference between failure and success. HPRC’s performance nutrition strategies—“Going the distance”—provide the information you need to know what and when to eat for endurance.

Revisiting the dangers of energy drinks

Energy drinks continue to be in the news, and their potential harmful effects should not be ignored, especially for children and teens.

HPRC has written several articles about energy drinks, their ingredients, and their potential harmful effects, especially for adolescents. They continue to be the topic of news articles, with another recent death of a teen who apparently consumed several energy drinks while on vacation and then died from cardiac arrest. The American Association of Poison Control Centers (AAPCC) urges the public to use caution when consuming energy drinks and lists many potential harmful reactions. Read more on this AAPCC web page, including statistics on reports of “exposures” to energy drinks.

HPRC has an Infosheet on energy drinks, highlighting the ingredients you may find on labels,and their potential stimulant effects. Be aware of the potential dangers, especially for children and teens, as outlined by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Portion size matters

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
Keeping portion sizes in check is key to managing your weight. Learn how to use your hand as a guide.

A key step toward achieving and maintaining a healthy weight is learning to accurately gauge how much you’re eating. In other words, how big are your portions? The most accurate way to gauge your portions is to measure or weigh your food, but who wants to take measuring cups and a scale to the chow hall? A more practical way to gauge your portion sizes is to “eyeball” them—that is, to visually compare your food portions to a familiar frame of reference. Of course, you might have larger or smaller hands, but generally speaking your hand size equates to your body size and, as a result, your portion needs. This infographic from HPRC uses your hand as your guide—a “handy” way to keep portion sizes in check, which can mean a leaner, healthier, better-performing you.

Portion Infographic [JPG]

Avoiding grains? Think again.

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
Whole grains are an essential part of a healthy diet and have known health benefits. Avoiding them is unnecessary.

If you’re avoiding grains due to a particular diet plan, or if you think you have to exclude grains due to gluten sensitivities, you may want to think again. HPRC has put together a table of grains (with and without gluten) and their basic nutrients to point out how nutritious grains can be. Even for those who are gluten-free or sensitive to gluten, the table shows there are plenty of healthy, gluten-free options to incorporate into your diet.

As the table indicates, whole grains are very nutrient dense: They contain fiber, vitamins such as niacin and folate (and other B vitamins), minerals such as calcium, iron, magnesium, potassium, manganese, zinc, and selenium, as well as protein and branched-chain amino acids.

A diet rich in whole grains has been associated with lower risk of Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Paleo diet followers, as well as those who are following a gluten-free diet, need not eliminate whole grains from their diet. The benefits are vast, with many choices for a varied diet. For more information about whole grains, see the ChooseMyPlate.gov resource, “Why is it important to eat grains, especially whole grains?

Grains Table [JPG]

You, your baby, and iodine

If you’re pregnant or breastfeeding, you might not be getting enough iodine to meet your needs (and your baby’s). Learn more about the role of iodine and how much you should be taking.

Iodine is an essential nutrient. It plays a key role in how well your thyroid functions and is particularly important during pregnancy and breastfeeding for the development of your baby’s brain. The Recommended Dietary Allowance for iodine for most adults is 150 micrograms (mcg). But women who are pregnant or breastfeeding need slightly more: 220 mcg and 290 mcg daily, respectively.

Iodine is present in some foods such as fish, dairy products, fruits, vegetables, and grains. Iodine is also added to table salt—referred to as “iodized salt.” Although most Americans eat too much salt, much of it comes from processed foods and typically isn’t iodized. Consequently, many women who are pregnant are iodine-deficient. If you’re pregnant or breastfeeding, the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology and the American Academy of Pediatrics recommend taking a prenatal vitamin to ensure you’re getting enough of all your vitamins and minerals, including iodine. In addition, if you’re vegan or you don’t eat dairy products or fish, talk to your doctor about your iodine status.

Read all prenatal dietary supplement labels carefully—whether they’re prescription or over-the-counter—so you can be certain your prenatal vitamin contains sufficient iodine to meet your needs during pregnancy and breastfeeding. Also, be sure to look for one that is third-party certified. For more information about iodine, read this fact sheet from the National Institutes of Health’s Office of Dietary Supplements.

 

The Nutrition Facts label: Changes coming?

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
The Nutrition Facts on food labels may be getting a new look. What are the proposed changes? What do you think?

We’ve said it before: The Nutrition Facts label on a food package can be a Warfighter’s best friend. But it might be getting a facelift, so to speak, to reflect the latest scientific information, courtesy of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The overall “look” of the label will be almost the same, but certain parts will change or be enhanced. Here are some of the proposed changes:Nutrition Labels comparison [JPG]

Different

  • Serving size: Updated to reflect the way people eat and drink today
  • Calories and Servings: Shown in larger type
  • Daily Values (DVs): Updated for various nutrients, such as sodium, dietary fiber, and vitamin D
  • % DVs: Listed first because it’s easier to read left-to-right

New

  • Added sugars will be shown on a new line.
  • DVs for vitamin D and potassium will be included.

Leaving

  • Calories from fat: Going away because according on research, the type of fat is more important than amount. However “Saturated Fat” and “Trans Fat” will remain on the label.

Take a look at the old and new versions side-by-side and then visit HPRC’s Facebook page to tell us what you think of the proposed changes! FDA is seeking comments on the proposed changes, and the closing date has been extended until August 1, 2014, so this is your opportunity to be heard.

Crazy for coconut water?

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
Coconut water is touted as a “natural” drink and a possible alternative for rehydration, but you may need additional nutrients during strenuous exercise.

Coconut water, the flavorful liquid found in young green coconuts, has become a popular drink. It is often promoted for a variety of ailments—from curing bad skin to resolving hangovers. But coconut water is also touted as a fluid replacement alternative. For this reason, some Warfighters choose coconut water over sports beverages because coconut water is “natural” and contains carbohydrates and key electrolytes such as sodium and potassium. However, not all brands of coconut water are created equal. In fact, they can vary considerably in terms of their nutrient content, so read product labels to be sure you’re getting the right amount of nutrients you need for optimal performance.

For example, the amount of carbohydrate and sodium in coconut water is sometimes very low, and individuals who participate in prolonged, vigorous exercise (longer than an hour) may need more carbohydrate and sodium. On the other hand, the potassium content of coconut water can be very high. Drinking a lot of coconut water (more than 8–10 servings in one day), especially if you eat potassium-rich foods such as bananas, can raise your body’s potassium levels too much, which can cause heart problems for some people. For more information about hydration needs, see HPRC’s article on fluids and exercise.

For periods of exercise less than one hour, water is always your best choice—about 7–10 ounces every 15–20 minutes. But for longer periods of exercise, sports beverages are a good choice because they are specially formulated to replenish carbohydrate, sodium, and potassium lost during extended and/or vigorous physical activity. Again, be sure to read the product label to make sure yours has what you need, and nothing more. If you choose sports beverages, drink three to eight ounces every 15–20 minutes to stay hydrated. For more information about proper hydration, read An Athlete’s Guide to Nutrient Timing.

And what about that coconut water? There simply isn’t enough evidence to support the use of coconut water as a remedy for any condition. And although it’s a tasty beverage, know what’s in it so you can replenish what your body needs—no more, no less.