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Welcome to the HPRC Blog. We've got lots of information here, from quick tips to in-depth posts about detailed human performance optimization topics.

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition

How to equip your kitchen for cooking

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
Learn what you need to equip your kitchen for everyday cooking.

By cooking and eating at home, you’ll save money and prepare healthier meals, but it means you need the right tools. You can pick up kitchen basics from yard sales or thrift stores, family donations, or even when friends or neighbors downsize.

You can purchase all the kitchen basics for roughly $200–300, but compare that to the amount you might spend each year on eating out. Your pieces don’t need to be lavish or color-coordinated, only functional. Remember: Each cook and kitchen are different, so make your choices based on your habits, needs, and space. Read more...

How to gauge food portion sizes

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
Keeping portion sizes in check is key to managing your weight. Learn how to use your hand as a guide.

One of the most important things you can do to achieve and maintain a healthy weight is to become aware of “portion sizes.” That refers to the actual amount of food you eat at a single time. It isn’t necessarily the same as the “serving size” that you see on a food label, but especially if you’re trying to lose weight, you might want to compare. In any case, it isn’t always practical to use a measuring cup when you’re dishing up a plate of food or spreading peanut butter on your toast.

A more realistic way to gauge your portion sizes is to “eyeball” them—that is, to visually compare your food portions to a familiar frame of reference. The graphic below uses your hand as your guide to keep portion sizes in check. Of course, your hand might be larger or smaller than someone else’s, but your hand size generally equates to your body size and, as a result, your portion needs. What’s more, it’s one measuring device you’ll always have on hand.

Your handy guide to portion sizes: Your fist about equals a one-cup serving of milk or raw vegetables. Your thumb about equals one 2-tablespoon serving of peanut butter or salad dressing. Your cupped palm about equals one half-cup serving of cooked fruit, vegetables, beans, or starch. Your thumbnail about equals a one-teaspoon serving of butter or margarine. And your open palm about equals one 3-ounce serving of cooked meat, fish, or poultry.

Energize your day with Go for Green®

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
Filed under: Diet, Go For Green®
Learn how Go for Green® can take your performance to the next level.

Is what you’re eating helping or hindering your performance? If you’re feeling low in energy, underperforming in the gym, or struggling through your workday, then choose better “fuel.” Go for Green® (G4G) makes it easy to find high-performance foods and beverages to boost your fitness, strength, and health. Look for DoD’s revised G4G initiative in your dining facility or galley to help make nutritious choices that fuel your body and mind, optimizing your energy and performance.

G4G labels foods and beverages with a stoplight system—Green, Yellow, and Red—to identify your best choices for peak performance. Foods are labeled with Low, Moderate, or High sodium symbols to point out sodium content too. Use these tips to build your energy-boosting plate:

  • Aim to fill half your plate with Green-coded foods. You can find healthy, Green-coded choices in every food group: grains, fats, proteins, fruits and vegetables, and dairy.
  • Eat consistently to keep your energy up. For best results, include Green-coded foods and drinks with every meal and snack—and stick to a schedule when possible.
  • Make nutrient-rich foods the easy choice at home and work. You’re more likely to eat what’s easily available, so choose foods that make you want to get up and go. Stock your fridge with Green-coded items, fill your kitchen cabinets with minimally processed foods, and keep a stash of healthy snacks in your desk drawer.

Learn more by visiting HPRC’s G4G section. Make sure to like G4G on Facebook! Connect with the G4G team, share your stories, and post pictures showing how you “Go for Green” using #getgotg4g.

Try the African Heritage Diet

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
Filed under: Diet, Nutrition
The African Heritage Diet pyramid is an eating guide based on the healthy food traditions of Americans and Caribbean people with African roots. Learn more.

Enjoy a flavorful diet, feel healthier, boost your performance, and lower health risks with the “African Heritage Diet.” The ancestors of African Americans brought wonderful food traditions to America, but many of these traditions have been lost over time. And health has suffered as ways of eating have changed.

African Americans struggle with high rates of obesity, putting them at a disproportionally higher risk of coronary heart disease, high blood pressure, stroke, diabetes, and certain cancers. The good news is you can improve your health and performance by including the African Heritage Diet principles in your healthy eating plan—whether or not you’re African American. Keep reading to learn more about this diet. Read more...

Perk up your day with oatmeal

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
Oatmeal is a heart-healthy food that can be enjoyed any time of day. Try these deliciously easy recipes.

Oatmeal is a comfort food that can be prepared in a variety of ways. It contains soluble fiber, which can help lower your blood cholesterol, keep you fuller longer, and boost your performance.

Choose steel-cut oats (regular or quick-cooking), which provide a nutty texture, or rolled oats, which are available in a variety of thicknesses: regular or old-fashioned (thickest), quick-cooking (thinner), and instant (thinnest). There really isn’t much of a difference in cooking times, so choose whichever texture you prefer. And limit instant varieties, which can pack large amounts of sodium and sugar. Read more...

SuperTrack nutrition for fitness

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
Learn how keeping an online food diary can help you stay motivated and on track to getting in shape.

One of the best ways to start losing weight or just improve your nutrition overall is to keep track of what you eat and drink every day. You probably have seen all the advice about eating well-balanced meals—from the amounts you should put on your plate at meals to the recommended amounts of essential nutrients you need every day. But how do you raise your awareness about what you eat and drink? And how can you keep track of whether you’re meeting your nutrition goals?

Try keeping a food diary. There are lots of online resources and apps to help you do this, but one worth exploring is the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) SuperTracker. It actually offers several tools to help you track your diet, get nutritional information on more than 8,000 foods, manage your weight, track your physical activities, access a “virtual coach” to meet your goals, and more. You can create a personal profile to save your information and develop a personal plan, or you can use the “general plan” for one-time use.

If you’re looking for more detail about the nutritional content of what you eat and drink, check out the USDA Food Composition Databases. This website contains detailed nutrient information for more than 180,000 branded and generic food products. Need to get more of certain nutrients in your diet? More vitamin B-12? Or more protein? There’s a search engine to help you find what foods provide the ones you’re looking for. You can even specify what type food or which meals you’d like information about.

Help your partner lose weight

Learn how to help your loved one lose weight as he or she goes through the “Stages of Change.”

If you’re concerned about your partner’s weight but she or he doesn’t seem worried, there are things you can do to create a healthy eating environment at home. Pushing or pressuring your loved one won’t work and might make things worse.

Instead, consider where your partner is in the “Stages of Change.” These are the stages one goes through on his or her journey to making a behavior change. Keep in mind that he or she has to be the one to initiate the change. Read more...

Food: Waste not, want not

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
Filed under: Food, Food waste, Recipes
Find out how to stretch your food budget by making use of foods you might otherwise toss out.

From the uneaten piece of toast in the morning to the leftover veggies thrown out after dinner, food waste can quickly add up. Produce often wilts and softens, and bread products dry out—the natural process of aging—before you get around to eating them. The good news is that many of these foods can be reclaimed. Keep reading for recipes and ideas that can help you use your food resources more efficiently and keep more money in your wallet! Read more...

Nutrition tips for preventing birth defects

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
January is National Birth Defects Prevention Month. Learn how to help protect your unborn baby by preventing infections and maintaining good nutrition during pregnancy.

Not all birth defects can be prevented, but a pregnant woman can increase her chances of having a healthy baby by eating well and avoiding infections that could impact her health and her baby’s health. You can lower your risk by following these practices:

Maintain good hygiene by washing your hands often. Be especially diligent when preparing food and before eating. Wash your hands after handling any raw foods, but especially meat, eggs, and produce.

Food choices are critical. Make sure to get 400 mcg of folic acid daily by either taking a supplement or eating a fortified breakfast cereal. (Ideally, all women should be ingesting this amount.) Be sure to avoid raw fish, raw milk and cheeses, and raw sprouts. If you have kids, take care not to share their food or drinks. Avoid putting your child’s pacifier in your mouth because many children have the cytomegalovirus, which is transmitted through body fluids such as saliva. Be sure to stay well hydrated, preferably with water, as it can help fight off infections.

It’s also important to see a healthcare provider early on and throughout your pregnancy. A healthy pregnancy includes controlling your weight by eating healthfully and being active. To learn more about National Birth Defects Prevention Month, visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention web page. And for more nutrition information for maintaining a healthy pregnancy, visit HPRC’s FAQs about nutrition during pregnancy.

Show concern about your partner’s weight

During Healthy Weight Week, find out how you can best support your partner’s healthy eating goals.

If you’re wondering how to talk with your partner about his or her weight, resist the urge to control or criticize. Instead, express genuine concern, and focus on healthy, sustainable changes that you can make together.

Couples typically share similar values and engage in activities together, so you’re more likely to impact each other’s health habits. Yet criticism about weight can be a source of conflict between some couples, which can affect your otherwise fulfilling relationship.

When one partner is at a healthy weight and one is overweight, there’s a greater chance for conflict, especially when they eat together. If one tries to restrict the other’s eating, things become less enjoyable. You might argue more too.

Try to be supportive about your loved one’s health issues. It’s most helpful when your message expresses caring and closeness. Be in tune with your partner’s needs if she or he is asking for your help with making healthier habits. Try being an “accountability” partner and help keep your partner on track towards his or her goals. Establish mutual goals you can work on to help improve your health and wellness too.

Some phrases to avoid include:

  • “You’re going to eat that?”
  • “Maybe you should stop eating.”
  • “You’re going to gain more weight if you keep eating so much.”

Some supportive phrases to try include:

  • “Let’s both commit to healthy eating in the new year.”
  • “Since you’ve expressed wanting to eat healthier, how can I help?”
  • “I know you’re trying hard to eat healthier, and it’s not easy. I’m proud of your efforts. Let’s continue in a positive direction.”

Create healthy lifestyle changes together. Pack nutritious lunches and snacks for work or school, and prepare well-balanced meals. Check with your installation about couples cooking classes and other wellness activities offered through Morale, Welfare, and Recreation (MWR) programs too. And check out HPRC’s ABCs of Nutrition page and videos for more ideas.

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