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Welcome to the HPRC Blog. We've got lots of information here, from quick tips to in-depth posts about detailed human performance optimization topics.

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition

NEW caffeine & performance infographic

If you use caffeine for an extra boost, check out the new OPSS infographic to learn how to use it safely and effectively.

Operation Supplement Safety (OPSS) has a new infographic about caffeine and performance. Caffeine, which is a stimulant, is found in various beverages, dietary supplements, and even your ration items. While it can help boost your mental and physical performance, it’s important to use it strategically. Otherwise, you could experience some unwanted side effects. So if you choose to use caffeine, check out our new infographic with information about how and when to use it and where you’ll find it. And for more information about caffeine, please visit the OPSS FAQs about caffeine and hidden sources of caffeine.

Caffeine Infographic updated 082516

Ready, Set, Go for Green®

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
Filed under: Diet, Go For Green®
Learn how Go for Green® can put the bounce back in your step!

Feeling low in energy? Underperforming at work, in the gym, or at home? What you’re eating might be slowing you down. Use Go for Green® (G4G) to make nutritious choices that fuel your body and mind, optimizing your energy and performance. Newly updated, DoD’s G4G program promotes nutritious foods and beverages to boost your fitness, strength, and health.

G4G labels foods and beverages with a stoplight system—Green, Yellow, and Red—to identify your best choices for peak performance. Foods are labeled with Low, Moderate, or High sodium symbols to point out sodium content too. Remember: Use these tips to build your energy-boosting plate!

  • Aim to fill half your plate with Green-coded foods. You can find healthy, Green-coded choices in every food group: grains, fats, proteins, fruits and vegetables, and dairy.
  • Eat consistently to keep your energy up. For best results, include Green-coded foods and drinks with every meal and snack—and stick to a schedule when possible.
  • Make nutrient-rich foods the easy choice at home and work. You’re more likely to eat what’s easily available, so choose foods that make you want to get up and go. Stock your fridge with Green-coded items, fill your kitchen cabinets with minimally processed foods, and keep a stash of healthy snacks in your desk drawer.

Learn more by visiting the G4G website section. Make sure to like G4G on Facebook! Connect with the G4G team, share your stories, and post pictures showing how you “Go for Green.”

Healthy twists on frozen treats

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
Filed under: Fruit, Nutrition, Summer
Does the thought of a frozen treat make you feel like a kid again? Start a new warm-weather tradition and make these easy treats with your friends and family!

Service members have enjoyed frozen treats at least since the Army and Navy boosted morale by serving ice cream sandwiches and sundaes to troops during World War II. However, these frozen sweets often contain excess calories and sugar, which can add to your daily calories. The good news is you can whip up healthy frozen treats at home.

The following tried-and-true favorites will delight your “inner child” and still fit nicely in a healthy meal pattern. And they include fruits and dairy—with additional calcium, potassium, fiber, protein, and other nutrients—possibly MIA from your diet. They also can be made for pennies, which is refreshing for your wallet!

  • Pudding pops. Prepare your favorite pudding recipe or powdered mix with skim milk. Add chopped peaches or berries. Freeze in molds or 4-oz paper cups for one hour. Insert popsicle sticks and freeze 2 more hours.
  • Frozen yogurt sundae. Scoop ½ cup frozen yogurt into a dish. Add one chopped banana and a handful of nuts.
  • Banana split. Lay banana halves in a dish. Add watermelon chunks and berries. Top with ½ cup frozen yogurt (any flavor) and 1 Tbsp of crunchy granola.
  • Banana pops. Insert a popsicle stick into a peeled, ripe banana. Freeze 2 hours. Put 1 tsp chocolate chips in the bottom corner of a small plastic bag. Melt in microwave for approximately 90 seconds. Cut off the corner of the bag and drizzle chocolate over frozen fruit. Quickly press with 1 tsp crushed nuts.
  • Frozen fruit. Portion canned fruit (in 100% juice) or fresh fruit (with juice) into 4-oz paper cups. Or use single-serving fruit cups. Freeze 1 hour. Insert popsicle sticks and freeze 2 more hours.
  • Frozen smoothie. Extra smoothie on hand? Freeze any leftovers in ice cube trays for 2 hours. Pop out.

Enjoy and stay cool!

Image from Naval Institute and must have following photo credit when used: "Photo from U.S. Naval Institute"

Photo from U.S. Naval Institute

Back-to-school ABCs for Total Family Fitness

Filed under: Family, Kids, School
School starts soon! Find out how to make a Total Family Fitness transition back to school this fall.

As summer vacation comes to an end, the transition back to school is just around the corner. Now’s the time to review the ABCs of a Total Family Fitness transition back to school: Awareness, Bedtime, Calmness, Diet, and Exercise. This is your chance to lay a foundation for your family’s healthy habits throughout the school year. HPRC's Total Family Fitness approach focuses on the health, wellness, and resilience of your family. It can help optimize and strengthen your family’s performance by integrating strategies that impact their mind, body, relationships, and environment—many of the same strategies used in the Total Force Fitness model for Warfighters. Read more...

Can Olympians motivate your eating?

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
Many of us will be glued to our TVs, watching the Olympic Games over the next several days. What can we learn about nourishing our bodies from these elite athletes?

Olympic athletes follow a rigorous training schedule with their eyes on the Gold, and what they eat and drink can make a winning difference! Most of them work with sports dietitians to help reach their nutrition goals. However, others can learn from their examples as well:

  • Food fuels and nourishes your body to help you perform well. Olympic athletes teach the importance of nutritious fueling every day by including the right balance of foods and beverages for each workout and event.
  • Successful Olympians jump-start their days with breakfasts that include protein and carbohydrate-rich foods. This keeps them energized and ready for the next challenge.
  • It’s important to keep a healthy relationship with food. Food is more than fuel. Even after eating to meet a specific goal, sometimes it’s still healthy to eat a favorite food just because you’re in the mood. However, some Olympians are at greater risk of eating disorders, especially those who become too focused on body image and develop an unhealthy relationship with food.
  • There’s no one-size-fits-all approach to calorie needs. Some endurance athletes take in over 5,000 calories daily. The United States Olympic Committee provides helpful eating guidelines for its athletes.

Remember that the goal for a healthy lifestyle is something greater than Gold: your wellness!

Fun facts: Did you know that the Armed Forces Sports (AFS) program paves the way for service members to compete in national, Olympic, and international athletic competitions?

Let’s cheer on the 16 Armed Forces members participating in Rio’s Olympic Games and those who will compete in the Paralympics next month.

Go team USA!

Fueling your adolescent athlete

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
Heat, humidity, and tough workouts can all be a part of your adolescent’s sports training program. Learn how proper nutrition and hydration help them play well.

School still might be out for some, but many teen athletes are already busy with fall sports practices. And knowing what and when to eat and drink can help them be on top of their game. Your teen’s schedule might seem more like a pro athlete’s workout schedule with two-a-days, strength-training programs, and speed training. However, these are often building blocks of teen athletes’ training for sports. Fueling the Adolescent Athlete contains useful information on how they can fuel their bodies before, during, and after practice.

Fueling comes in two forms: what teen athletes eat to provide energy and what they drink to help stay hydrated. Eating nutrient-packed meals and snacks before, after, and even during practices and games is essential for optimal performance. The right balance of carbohydrates and protein work together to fuel and build muscles.

Staying hydrated goes hand in hand with peak performance. It’s often difficult for adolescent athletes to stay hydrated in heat and humidity, but drinking regularly and keeping an eye on their urine color can be helpful.

For more adolescent and family nutrition information, check out HPRC’s Family Nutrition section.

The buzz on caffeinated gum

Can caffeinated gum improve performance in Warfighters?

Caffeinated gum is a quick and efficient way for Warfighters to consume caffeine in order to improve physical performance and maintain cognitive capabilities temporarily during situations that demand vigilance. Because the caffeine is absorbed through tissues in the mouth, it enters the bloodstream faster than foods, beverages, and supplements do. In addition to the rapid absorption of caffeine, caffeinated gum offers other benefits such as being lightweight, compact, and providing caffeine in an appropriate amount when needed. However, caffeinated gum might not always be the best choice depending on your situation, needs, and preferences. Read more...

World Hepatitis Day

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
Filed under: Hepatitis, Nutrition
World Hepatitis Day is on July 28. Learn about raising worldwide awareness to influence changes in disease prevention, testing, and treatment.

On World Hepatitis Day, millions of people help raise awareness about preventing and treating viral hepatitis. The disease—inflammation of the liver caused by virus—results in 1.4 million deaths worldwide each year. Over 5 million Americans are infected with the most common forms: Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C. And an estimated 4–17% of veterans don’t know they’re infected. However, unless you or someone you know has the virus, you’re a healthcare provider, or travel internationally, you probably know little about this disease.

Left untreated, hepatitis can damage your liver, a vital organ that filters blood and produces important proteins. Jaundice—yellowing of the skin and eyes—is a major symptom. Other symptoms can include fever, fatigue, nausea, vomiting, and abdominal issues. It’s harder to diagnose hepatitis because many of these symptoms are common to other ailments too. The good news is that vaccination, early testing, diagnosis, and treatment can help save lives.

Take the necessary steps to prevent hepatitis. Practice safe food handling. Wash your hands well or use an alcohol-based gel sanitizer. Avoid blood-to-blood contact: Don’t share razors or needles. If you decide to get a tattoo or body piercing, make sure the facility uses sterile needles. Check with your doctor about available vaccines too.

If you’ve been diagnosed with hepatitis, then follow a healthy-eating plan to boost your liver health. Work towards achieving and maintaining an ideal body weight. Being overweight is linked to fatty liver, which can put you at higher risk of cirrhosis. Limit alcohol because it also can lead to serious liver disease. Eat a nutritious diet, including plenty of fruits and vegetables. Coffee consumption can lower the risk of liver disease progression and cirrhosis. And it can help improve your response to hepatitis treatment. So, drink it if you like it. And check with your healthcare provider before taking any dietary supplements because some can further damage your liver.

Visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) page to learn more about viral hepatitis. Remember to help raise awareness about World Hepatitis Day too. And ask your healthcare provider about getting tested if you suspect you might be infected. Seek treatment early.

Image of World Hepatitis Day 2016 infographic

Free summer meals for kids

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
Some children and teens are vulnerable to hunger and poor nutrition, especially during the summer months when school is out. Learn how the Summer Meals Program keeps them healthy.

Some children go hungry during the summer months, especially those who receive free meals during the school year. Poor nutrition makes them prone to illness and other health issues too. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) aims to fill this nutrition gap—by providing free meals to eligible kids and teens (up to age 18) at summer meal sites—through its Summer Meals Program.

Sites include schools, community centers, libraries, parks, playgrounds, and faith-based centers. Some also offer activities, games, music, and crafts to help kids learn about the benefits of healthy nutrition and physical fitness. Check out USDA’s Summer Meal Site Finder or call the National Hunger Hotline at 1-866-348-6479 to learn more. Follow the USDA’s Eat Smart to Play Hard recommendations and take the “Family Challenge” to stay healthy too.

  • Drink smart to play hard. Avoid sugary drinks and drink water often.
  • Try more fruits and vegetables. On “Try-day Fridays,” eat a new fruit or vegetable, or enjoy one prepared in a new way.
  • Limit screen time to 2 hours each day. Read books, play board games, or work on art projects instead.
  • Move more—at least 60 minutes each day. Go outside for a family walk or hike. Or cool off at a public swimming pool.

Reward your family’s healthy moves with a picnic or visit to a local park. And have fun experiencing new ways to feel your best this summer. 

 

Food tips for your PCS

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
Filed under: Food, Moving, PCS
Is a move on your horizon? Add an “eating plan” to your checklist.

Packing up and heading to a new location can be stressful, even for service members who move often. Get a jump on your planning and use these “food resource” tips to ensure a smooth transition.

  • Plan meals. A few weeks before you move, inventory your food. Create weekly meal plans (and choose recipes) to use up what’s on hand, especially those foods you can’t take along.
  • Gift excess food. Give condiments and opened foods to a favorite neighbor. Although most unopened foods can go with your household goods, you can donate any excess to a food pantry if you want to save on weight. Some moving companies even offer this as a free service!
  • Pack a food box. Choose a clear plastic box and add basics—such as cereal, nut butter, jelly, coffee, and teas—for the first few days in your new home. Include an easy microwave meal such as red beans and instant rice too. And add a coffee pot, utensils, bowls, plates, plastic zip-type bags (in assorted sizes), dish soap, sponge, and a towel for cleanup. Send it in the moving truck or take it with you. Either way, plan accordingly.
  • Pack a cooler. Driving to your new location? Bring water, baby carrots, apples, or dried fruit for the car ride.
  • Manage overseas or regional moves. Contact your installation's family support office and ask about borrowing kitchenware essentials, especially if you don’t own any or expect them to arrive late. Remember to stock up on your favorite non-perishables—either hard-to-find or unavailable in your new location—and send them along with your household goods.
  • Unload and unpack. Make sure you’re properly fueled and hydrated if you’re doing any heavy lifting on move-in day. And forgo any alcohol.

 Happy trails! 

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