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Welcome to the HPRC Blog. We've got lots of information here, from quick tips to in-depth posts about detailed human performance optimization topics.

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition

FDA News Release: Illegal drug claims banned for chelation products

HPRC Fitness Arena: Dietary Supplements, Nutrition
New York dietary supplement manufacturer agrees to remove drug claims from his website.

New York dietary supplement manufacturer Howard Sousa, of Artery Health Institute LLC and DeSousa LLC, has agreed to remove drug claims on his company’s website. Sousa’s Advanced EDTA Oral Chelation capsules were promoted on the website as drugs since the marketing language made disease treatment claims. More information is provided in the FDA News Release.

FDA News Release: Drug residues in veal calves

HPRC Fitness Arena: Dietary Supplements, Nutrition
Veal calves sold as food contain illegal drug residues.

Virtue Calves was cited for selling veal calves that contain illegal drug residues, which is in violation of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. The company is now required to keep careful records of which animals have been medicated so that illegal drug residues do not enter the food supply. More information is provided in the FDA News Release.

How families can benefit from the USDA’s switch to MyPlate

The USDA’s new MyPlate program is designed to make learning about and practicing healthy eating habits more appealing and more fun for all members of the family.

The USDA announced on June 2, 2011, that its classic food guide Pyramid is being replaced with the easy-to-understand and interactive MyPlate. Using a “familiar mealtime visual,” MyPlate is intended to remind Americans about balancing meals with the five food groups: fruits, vegetables, grains, protein, and dairy. Based on the 2010 Dietary Guidelines, notable changes to the new guide are the inclusion of more fruits and vegetables, less grains, and the re-categorization of oils as providing “essential nutrients” but not appearing on the plate.

The result is a simple visual graphic of a balanced meal that families can use as a tool to make sure the portions of the major food groups are covered in meals. The simplicity of the graphic helps ALL family members, especially children, become more engaged in what and how much they should be eating. An interactive plate on the MyPlate website allows users to click on each section of the plate, which then displays a page for the selected food group with description, key message, and a list with pictures of single-serving sizes of some common foods in that group. These changes allow families to easily identify what a healthy, balanced meal looks like. Also featured is an Interactive Tools section that enables users to develop personalized plans and learn about specific healthy food choices. When all family members know the basics of healthy eating, mealtime can truly be a shared event.

MyPlate can also encourage family discussions about healthy foods, which can help develop good eating habits by all members of a family. For example, you can find out if there are any particular foods that family members like or dislike, and then find and offer alternatives in the specific food group of a disliked item. This will help eliminate the likelihood that someone will skip the essential healthy components of a meal. Get everyone excited and involved during mealtime! Fun meals shared as a family can promote healthy eating habits for children that they can carry into adulthood and can reinforce family bonding.

Keep in mind that MyPlate isn’t designed as strict rule to be followed—it’s perfectly fine to have dairy products directly on the plate instead of in a cup. Desserts, which are currently placed in the “Empty Calories” section, are okay when consumed in moderation in appropriate portions. You may still have to seek out other sources for how to prepare foods in healthy ways and to determine for the nutrition content of many food items. The information on MyPlate should be used as a tool to build a foundation of knowledge about food choices and help set healthy eating goals for your family. Families should take this change as an opportunity to get the entire family involved in healthy eating.

Fruits & Vegetables are important

HPRC Fitness Arena:
Add these resources to your arsenal of healthy-eating tools to help you get more fruits and vegetables in your diet.

Fruits & Veggies — More Matters™ is a health initiative led by The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and Produce for Better Health Foundation (PBH), to increase daily consumption of fruits and vegetables. Visit the CDC and PBH websites for helpful tips, recipes, and interactive tools to help you increase your intake of fruits and vegetables.

A New Eating Guide: MyPlate

HPRC Fitness Arena:
The USDA has a new symbol for good nutrition, emphasizing higher proportions of fruits and vegetables.

The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) released MyPlate as the new Dietary Guidance graphic. MyPlate replaces the Food Guide Pyramid and is split into five sections for fruit, vegetables, grains, dairy and protein. The new recommendations focus on the importance of eating fruits and vegetables (half a “plate”). Go to www.ChooseMyPlate.gov for the new graphic and recommendations. For the USDA press release issued about MyPlate, click here.

New cooking temperature for pork

HPRC Fitness Arena:
The USDA recommendations for cooking various types of meet offer important and useful guidelines, including some changes from previous directions.

The United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) new cooking guidelines for meats include a reduced “safe” cooking temperature for whole cuts of pork to 145ºF (down from 160ºF). They recommend using a food thermometer and allowing a three-minute rest time before serving. For whole cuts of beef, veal, and lamb, the safe temperature is the same—145ºF—but the new guidelines add a three-minute rest time after these meats, too, are removed from a heat source.  For additional information, including the recommendations for cooking ground meats and poultry, read the new cooking guidelines.

What is WIC?

HPRC Fitness Arena:
Free nutrition-related services are available to low-income families, including military; in 2009, more than 9 million women, children, and infants benefited.

WIC is the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children. It provides food, nutrition counseling, and access to health services for low-income women, infants, and children. Eligibility to receive services is based on income, state residency, and “nutrition risk.” WIC is available for military families who qualify based on income. For more information, including eligibility and program services, see the Nutrition Program Facts.

 

Durbin raises concerns over melatonin baked goods

HPRC Fitness Arena:
Senator Dick Durbin (D-IL) has asked the FDA to clarify its regulatory position on dietary supplements and food additives on the back of widespread concerns about the marketing of melatonin-containing baked goods.

Food Safety News is reporting that Senator Dick Durbin (D-IL) has asked the FDA to clarify its regulatory position on dietary supplements and food additives on the back of widespread concerns about the marketing of melatonin-containing baked goods.  A recent HPRC Performance News  post notes that there have been questions raised on commercially available products such as Lazy Cakes and Lulla Pies that are marketed as "relaxation" brownies - which contain high doses of the sleep aid melatonin.


These products are being sold as dietary supplements to help people relax and fall asleep, rather than foods containing additives.  Senator Durbin contends that these foods are being sold as dietary supplements but are really foods containing a dietary ingredient additive, which would require FDA approval. He has asked U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Commissioner Margaret Hamburg to see if she has the authority  "to oversee the safety of foods containing dietary supplement additives."

Pistachios: A heart-healthy snack

HPRC Fitness Arena:
If you are nuts about nuts, the good news is that pistachios are good for you, even if you are trying to lose weight.

Pistachios contain the “good fat”—unsaturated (polyunsaturated and monounsaturated)—which can help blood cholesterol levels and decrease risk of heart disease. They are also a good source of antioxidants, vitamins, minerals, and fiber. And if you’re watching your weight, pistachios can still be a healthy choice for a snack, as shown in a recent study in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition. Read more about this study and about other pistachio health benefits at www.pistachiohealth.com.

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FDA Press Release: Don’t use products marketed as antimicrobial dietary supplements

HPRC Fitness Arena:
The FDA is warning consumers not to buy or use products claiming to antimicrobial and marketed as dietary supplements.

 

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is warning consumers to stop using dietary supplement products that claim to be antimicrobial (antibiotic, antifungal, or antiviral) drugs. These products are falsely promoted to treat upper respiratory infections, sinusitis, pneumonia, bronchitis, and colds, and they look like antimicrobial products sold in Mexico.  More information, including product names, is provided in the FDA Press Release.

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