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HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition

Durbin raises concerns over melatonin baked goods

HPRC Fitness Arena:
Senator Dick Durbin (D-IL) has asked the FDA to clarify its regulatory position on dietary supplements and food additives on the back of widespread concerns about the marketing of melatonin-containing baked goods.

Food Safety News is reporting that Senator Dick Durbin (D-IL) has asked the FDA to clarify its regulatory position on dietary supplements and food additives on the back of widespread concerns about the marketing of melatonin-containing baked goods.  A recent HPRC Performance News  post notes that there have been questions raised on commercially available products such as Lazy Cakes and Lulla Pies that are marketed as "relaxation" brownies - which contain high doses of the sleep aid melatonin.


These products are being sold as dietary supplements to help people relax and fall asleep, rather than foods containing additives.  Senator Durbin contends that these foods are being sold as dietary supplements but are really foods containing a dietary ingredient additive, which would require FDA approval. He has asked U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Commissioner Margaret Hamburg to see if she has the authority  "to oversee the safety of foods containing dietary supplement additives."

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FDA Press Release: Don’t use products marketed as antimicrobial dietary supplements

HPRC Fitness Arena:
The FDA is warning consumers not to buy or use products claiming to antimicrobial and marketed as dietary supplements.

 

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is warning consumers to stop using dietary supplement products that claim to be antimicrobial (antibiotic, antifungal, or antiviral) drugs. These products are falsely promoted to treat upper respiratory infections, sinusitis, pneumonia, bronchitis, and colds, and they look like antimicrobial products sold in Mexico.  More information, including product names, is provided in the FDA Press Release.

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FDA Press Release: FDA Warns about Counterfeit ExtenZe Dietary Supplements

HPRC Fitness Arena:
The FDA is warning consumers about a counterfeit product marketed as the dietary supplement product “ExtenZe”

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued a press release to consumers warning them about a counterfeit product being represented as the dietary supplement "ExtenZe.” The counterfeit product has hidden ingredients, including tadalafil or a combination of tadalafil and sildenafil, which are active ingredients of FDA-approved drugs, making these products unapproved drugs. Taking these products with prescription medications containing nitrates could lower blood pressure to dangerous levels. More information, including the lot numbers on the counterfeit packages, is provided in the FDA Press Release.

Childhood obesity

HPRC Fitness Arena:
Obesity has become a major problem among children that leads to other serious health risks.

Childhood obesity has become a significant health problem, putting children and adolescents at risk for developing asthma, high blood pressure, and type 2 diabetes, as well as other serious health risks. The American Academy of Pediatrics website has a parenting corner, helpful links, and resources on this topic.  See their “Overweight and Obesity” section.

FDA Press Release: FDA and FTC issue warning letter to companies selling fraudulent STD products

HPRC Fitness Arena:
The FDA and FTC have issued a warning to companies marketing unproven products to treat STDs.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) issued warning letters to several companies selling unproven products claiming to treat, cure, and prevent sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). These products—such as Medavir, Herpaflor, Viruxo, C-Cure, and Never an Outbreak—violate federal law because the FDA has not evaluated them for safety and effectiveness. Some are marketed as dietary supplements, but the FDA considers them drugs since they are offered for the treatment of disease. More information is provided in the FDA Press Release.

Sources of dark green vegetables

HPRC Fitness Arena:
“Dark green vegetables” are an important component of a healthy diet, but what vegetables other than broccoli are in this class?

We’re supposed to eat a lot of dark green vegetables, but beyond broccoli, what are some good options? For starters, pick a salad that has romaine or dark green leafy lettuce. Bok choy, collard greens, kale, mustard greens, spinach, turnip greens, and watercress are all good dark green vegetables that contain lots of nutrients. Variety is the key to an overall healthy diet, so don’t forget to include some dark green vegetables in your daily diet.

Beware of Fraudulent "Dietary Supplements"

HPRC Fitness Arena:
Federal regulators continue to warn consumers about tainted, dangerous products that are marketed as dietary supplements.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has found nearly 300 fraudulent products–promoted mainly for weight loss, sexual enhancement, and bodybuilding–that contain hidden or deceptively labeled ingredients.

Click here for more information [PDF].

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Food dyes and hyperactivity: Is there a link?

HPRC Fitness Arena:
In the debate over food dyes and hyperactivity in children, the FDA feels there is not enough evidence to support any action.

Red 40, Yellow 5, Yellow 6, and other dyes are artificial colorings allowed in foods in the U.S., yet there is a long-standing debate over whether food dyes contribute to hyperactivity in children. The Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) Food Advisory Committee met the last week of March and determined that there is not enough evidence to support the link between food dyes and hyperactivity in children. For now, there will be no warning labels on food products containing dyes.

Relaxation beverages: Don’t believe the hype

HPRC Fitness Arena:
A new wave of beverage products is gaining attention, aimed at helping us relax, reducing our anxiety, and helping us sleep.

We’ve seen all the recent news and reports about energy drinks and the concern about the amount of caffeine in these products. Now a new wave of products is gaining attention, aimed at helping us relax, reducing our anxiety, and helping us sleep. These “relaxation beverages,” or “anti-energy drinks,” contain ingredients such as melatonin, valerian root, kava, St. John’s Wort, L-theanine, rose hips, and chamomile. A great number of relaxation beverages have been introduced into the market over the last three years, with names such as “Dream Water,” “iChill,” “Vacation in a Bottle,” and “Unwind.” Consumers of any age can buy these drinks in convenience stores, college campuses, and online.

Part of the problem with these relaxation drinks is that some of their ingredients, particularly melatonin, have not gone through the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) approval process required for all food ingredients to be designated as safe or GRAS (“generally recognized as safe”). Melatonin is a hormone made by the body, but it is also available as a supplement and is often used to treat sleep disorders and jet lag. The FDA sent a warning letter last year to the manufacturers of the “Drank” beverage saying, “there is no food additive regulation in effect that provides for the safe use of melatonin…Likewise, we are not aware of any basis to conclude that melatonin is GRAS for use in conventional foods.” The manufacturers of “Drank” want their product to be classified as a dietary supplement, not as a beverage, since the FDA scrutinizes foods and beverages much more closely than dietary supplements.

People who have liver problems, liver disease, or are taking prescription drugs should be cautious about using the herb kava, an ingredient found in some of these relaxation drinks. Kava has been linked to severe liver injury, and the FDA issued a consumer advisory in 2002 with a warning that kava-containing dietary supplement products have been associated with liver-related injuries, including hepatitis, cirrhosis, and liver failure. Valerian root, a medicinal herb, is used to treat sleep disorders as well as anxiety. Although some research has been conducted on the effects of valerian on insomnia, the data are mixed, and no studies have tested the safety and effectiveness of the combination of ingredients found in relaxation beverages.

The marketing of relaxation drinks is also of concern, as it is geared toward a younger crowd, with bottles resembling the look of popular energy drinks and shots. The concern is that young adults will think nothing of having more than one of these a day. Some of these beverages have warnings on their labels stating that users should not consume them before operating/driving machinery or if pregnant or nursing.

What’s the bottom line? Buyers beware! There’s no magic pill, and there’s no magic beverage. Try to determine the causes of your stress and/or insomnia, address those issues, and then work towards establishing a healthy lifestyle overall.

2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans

HPRC Fitness Arena:
The online version of the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans is now available.

The online version of the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans is now available. The 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans establishes the scientific and policy basis for all Federal nutrition programs, including research, education, nutrition assistance, labeling, and nutrition promotion.

Click on the link below to access the guideline. The guidelines are located on the HPRC Nutrition page and can be found under "The Basics" tab.

2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans

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