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Welcome to the HPRC Blog. We've got lots of information here, from quick tips to in-depth posts about detailed human performance optimization topics.

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition

Chia seeds and drug testing

Will chia seeds cause a positive drug test? Read more and find out what you really need to avoid.

Chia (Salvia hispanica) seeds are rich in omega-3 fatty acids and fiber. As such, they have become a popular food item, and you can also find chia (seeds and oil) in many dietary supplements marketed to support heart and digestive health. On its own, chia will not produce a positive drug test. However, when you look at ingredient lists on product labels, don’t confuse Salvia hispanica (chia) with Salvia divinorum (Diviner’s sage), which is banned by some services. There are many types of salvia, so please read the OPSS FAQ about salvia for more information. If you’re interested in learning more about chia seeds, visit this webpage from MedlinePlus.

Plan your meals in minutes!

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
The workday is ending—and you’re stressed from not knowing what to prepare at mealtime. With some advance preparation using HPRC’s meal-planning strategies, you’ll look forward to what’s for dinner.

We all want to serve healthy, nourishing food to our families. But sometimes we let our best intentions get in the way. You wouldn’t head into the woods without a plan, map, or GPS—so why begin your day with little thought about eating well? Start this year off right by learning and putting these easy meal-planning practices into place. Once you’ve established these habits, you’ll be amazed at how good it feels to map out your meals. The more you practice HPRC’s strategies—the faster and fitter you’ll be—a huge savings to your body, time, and wallet. Read more here. 

 

Compare body fat standards by service branch

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
Feeling fit? Compare the U.S. Armed Forces’ body fat standards by service branch.

Several of the service branches have recently updated their body fat composition standards. The U.S. Armed Forces uses body composition (a measure of a person’s body fat) as one factor to determine a service member’s fitness level.  

Each service has its own standards (within DoD guidelines 1308.1) and evaluation methods. Whether you’re a healthcare provider or service member, check out HPRC’s Body Fat Standards by Service Branch infosheet to compare the different service standards.

It’s that sneezing and sniffling time of year—again

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
Filed under: Cold, Colds, Illness
Fighting a cold? These healthful remedies should help you get back on your feet sooner than later.

Each year, the average adult catches 2–3 colds lasting 7–9 days each. That’s almost an entire month—YIKES! What you eat and drink each day can impact your body’s resistance to sickness. Want to keep the doctor away? Eat 9 servings of colorful fruits and vegetables daily.

Choosing nutritious foods when you’re sick shortens the number of days you feel badly and helps you feel better while you’re recovering. Here are some tips to help you get well soon:

  • Grab a mug of chicken soup to clear your head and soothe your throat.
  • Drink tea (black, green or white) to break up chest congestion and stay hydrated. Tea also contains a group of antioxidants, which could boost overall immunity.
  • Take a spoonful of honey before bedtime to quiet a cough. You could also add honey and lemon juice to one cup of boiling water. (Not for kids under one year of age.)

These recommendations might have previously been considered folklore or old wives’ tales, but science now shows that Grandma knew best!

Peak nutrition in cold weather

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
Just because the outside temperature is dropping doesn’t mean your performance has to tumble too.

Daily exposure to cold weather increases your nutritional needs. But if you only PT outside for an hour or so a day, workout in a gym, and spend the rest of your time indoors, your daily food and fluid needs don’t change much—even when it’s cold outside. If you’re training in the cold for long periods of time, such as during field deployment or cold weather operations, here are a few ways to help maintain peak performance:

  • Calories. Moving through snow and icy terrain while wearing heavy gear causes your body to use more energy. Consume three to four standard MREs or three MCW/LRP rations per day to meet your energy needs. (At times you may have to force yourself to eat.)
  • Carbohydrates. Carbs are your body’s first choice for energy. When your caloric needs increase, you’ll need to eat more carbs. Be sure to eat high-carb foods such as rice, noodles, bread, First Strike Bar, fruit or sports bars, crackers, granola, pretzels, and carb-fortified drink mixes from your MRE or MCW/LRP rations. Store snacks in your pockets so you can fuel on the go, between meals, and before bed.
  • Hydration. Yes, you can still get dehydrated in the cold. Cold temperatures increase your fluid loss through increased urine output, breathing, and sweating (due to insulated clothing and intensity and duration of exercise). Fuel with fluids (excluding alcohol) even when you’re not thirsty. Make sure to monitor your hydration status by checking your urine color.

Remember, this isn’t the time to start a new diet (such as a low-carb diet) or lose weight, so fuel up to perform well.

 

Chilling out with relaxation drinks?

Relaxation drinks seem like an appealing way to relieve stress, but some are not as harmless as they appear.

If you’re feeling stressed, don’t rely on liquid relaxation products to relieve your tension. While energy drinks are promoted to give you an extra boost, relaxation drinks* are marketed to do just the opposite and help you, well, relax. These products commonly contain the amino acid theanine, as well as several different plant-based ingredients. But the science doesn’t support the use of relaxation drinks to decrease stress or anxiety, and consumers should be cautious of two ingredients: kava and melatonin. Bottom line, if you’re feeling stressed, try to identify the cause, and then use stress management strategies backed by scientific evidence. Read more here.

Decrease your holiday food stress

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
Need to cross “food worries” off your holiday checklist? There are ways to add nutrients, cut calories, and enjoy the holidays!

Who says that figuring out what to prepare and eat over the coming holiday weeks needs to be stressful? Worrying about choosing appropriate food gifts? How about gaining weight and never taking it off—again? These concerns are often on our minds at this time of year. So here are some tips to enjoy a healthy holiday.

  • Make recipes more nutritious. Use evaporated skim milk in place of heavy cream in soups, quiches, pies, and other recipes. Substitute whole-wheat for white flour in bread, gravy, and cookie recipes.
  • Reduce your calorie intake. Choose more fruits and vegetables at each meal. Don’t skip a meal—because you could overeat at the next meal. Eat smaller portions instead.
  • Pick healthy gifts. Offer a welcome basket of fresh fruit or assorted packages of nuts and dried fruit. Put together a basket of healthy ingredients for a quick meal. Give a personal favorite such as a special bread, olive oil, or jam.

Challenge yourself by putting at least one tip into practice. It guarantees your holidays will be less stressful!

There is (almost) free lunch!

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition
Whip up these “tried and true” soups for pennies.

We all want to use our food resources and time wisely. Let’s talk about ways to save minutes and money. As the holidays approach, we want quick, easy meals to fortify us. Using the bones from our holiday meats can make an almost “free” extra meal or two. Helpful hint: store the bones in the freezer until you are ready to get cooking!

These tasty soups are healthy and affordable:

  • Bean Soup. Put a ham bone in a crockpot. Cover with 8 cups of water. Add one pound of rinsed, dried pinto beans. Season as desired—jalapeno peppers and cilantro are especially good. Cook on High for 5–6 hours or Low for 11–12 hours. Skim the layer of fat from the top. Chop and add any leftover ham to the soup.
  • Turkey Vegetable Soup. Put turkey bones in a large pot. Cover with 6­–8 cups of water and bring to a boil. Turn the heat down and simmer for 30 minutes. Remove the bones and strain the broth. Add frozen corn, green beans, grated carrots, and instant brown rice. Bring to a boil and simmer for 10 minutes. Add chopped pieces of turkey meat if desired. Season with black pepper.

Who knew making soups could be so simple? These meals just might become a mainstay of your recipe toolkit! 

Eating on the road again

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
Filed under: Diet, Nutrition, Travel
Taking a holiday road trip? Make sure your car isn’t the only “vehicle” that’s properly fueled.

A critical part of any road trip is making sure you are nourished for the journey. Vacation leave is approved, your pet is at the sitter, and suitcases are in the trunk. Are you ready to get in your car and drive? Your car is fueled but you are not. BIG mistake! As you prepare to travel, here are some ways to help you go the distance:

  • Eat before you go. However, foods such as coffee, doughnuts, energy drinks, and candy bars aren’t the right fuel. These types of foods can cause your energy levels to crash.
  • Pack a travel meal if you are going to be on the road for a while. It can be as easy as a peanut-butter sandwich on whole-wheat bread plus a banana.
  • Bring tasty snacks. Examples include popcorn, homemade trail mix (whole-wheat cereals such as wheat squares or toasty oats, nuts, dried fruit, cheese crackers, and chocolate pieces), fruit, and nuts. Sugar-free gum makes a great addition to your stash.
  • Stay hydrated. Bring along a water supply for each traveler.
  • Eat small amounts of food every 2–3 hours to stave off sleepiness. Instead of eating while you drive, take a break at a rest stop. You can also switch drivers if needed.

These tips can help you save money and time. In addition, you won’t be as tempted by the high-calorie, fatty, sugary foods offered at travel centers and gas stations. What’s more, you’ll arrive feeling refreshed and ready for the next adventure!

Cooking with herbs for health

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
Need a way to spice up your meals? Learn more about the benefits of cooking with herbs.

Herbs such as rosemary, thyme, and basil add a flavorful punch to meals, but they also may provide health benefits. Many herbs contain antioxidant and anti-inflammatory components. As plants, herbs contain beneficial phytochemicals, which are being researched for their role in cancer prevention. Here are some tips on using culinary herbs to make your meals both tastier and healthier.

  • Pre-seasoned, pre-flavored foods (such as rice) often cost more than the basics. Buy unseasoned, plain staples for your pantry, and then add your own variety by using different herbs.
  • If you’re trying to follow a low-sodium eating plan, substitute herbs in place of or in addition to a small amount of salt to season your meal.
  • Can’t use up fresh herbs fast enough? Purchase dried or frozen herbs, which have a longer shelf life. Just check your recipe, as you probably need to use less of dried herbs than fresh.

Ready to test your green thumb? Place potted herbs on your patio, deck, or windowsill for fresh herbs whenever you need them. Adding herbs to your meat, fish, vegetable, and grains not only adds color and flavor, but it also may be good for your health. Learn more about herb and food combinations.  

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