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Alerts

RegenESlim Appetite Control Capsules voluntarily recalled due to the presence of DMAA.

FDA warns consumers about caffeine powder. 

FDA advises consumers to stop using any supplement products labeled as OxyElite Pro or VERSA-1. Please see the following advisories: FDA -10/08/13, FDA - 10/11/13 and CDC - 10/08/13.

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Announcements

New article on reporting side effects of supplements
Just published in The New England Journal of Medicine: A recent article brings up dietary supplement issues you need to be aware of and discusses how dietary supplement side effects could be monitored better. A PDF of the April 3rd article is available free online.

3rd International Congress on Soldiers’ Physical Performance
August 18-21, 2014
The ICSPP delivers innovative scientific programming on soldiers’ physical performance with experts from around the world.

DMAA list updated for April 2014

Fueling Performance Photo Campaign
Share photos of how you fuel your performance and be featured on our Facebook page!

Dietary supplement module
Earn continuing education credits (if eligible) for this two-hour online module.

Operation LiveWell

Performance Triad

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HPRC Blog

Welcome to the HPRC Blog. We've got lots of information here, from quick tips to in-depth posts about detailed human performance optimization topics.

HPRC Fitness Arena: Total Force Fitness

Strength training for children and teens

Resistance training has become popular among children and teens. When performed in a safe, structured environment, this type of exercise can be very beneficial for improving their health and athletic performance.

At some point or another, your child or teen might pick up those dumbbells you have lying around the house. They’ve seen you lift weights as part of your regular exercise routine and decided they want to get stronger too. But you might wonder if strength training is safe for your kids.

Lifting the size weights you use might be too much for kids and teens, but in general strength training (also referred to as resistance training) can be a safe and healthy way to improve muscular fitness for children and teens, starting as early as seven or eight years old, when their coordination skills have developed enough. The goal should be improving muscular fitness while having fun and learning effective training methods.

As a parent you need to make sure your kids are supervised and receiving age-appropriate and skilled instructions in order to reduce the risk of injury. With proper technique and safe practices, strength training is not dangerous for growing bodies. However, light weights, exercise bands, or your child’s own body weight should be used to build his or her strength. Currently, there are no specific guidelines for exactly how much lifting they should do. However, according to the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) one to three sets of six to 15 repetitions, two to three times per week is considered reasonable.

Resistance training is not the same as bodybuilding, weightlifting, or powerlifting, which are associated with competition, high intensity, and maximum weights. The American Academy of Pediatrics and ACSM are opposed to children using these methods or the use of "one-rep-max" (a method sometimes used to assess strength) due to the increased risk for injury.

While a medical examination is not mandatory, it is recommended for children who want to begin a strength-training program. And remember that strength training is something you can do with your children. Family fitness is a great way to keep you and your child healthy and active while you spend quality time together.

Defining “heat illness”

HPRC Fitness Arena: Environment, Total Force Fitness
At some point, you’ll be required to perform in a hot environment, whether it’s on a mission or for the PRT. When you do, be on the lookout for signs and symptoms of progressing heat illness.

Heat illness is a hot topic for the military. Did you know there is a spectrum of conditions that fall under the term “heat illness,” some more severe than others? HPRC has great resources on how to prepare for exposure to hot environments and how to prevent heat illness. Read HPRC’s Answer to “What IS heat illness?” for more about what heat illness is and how to identify the signs that you might be developing more serious conditions.

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database App

Healthcare provider app to get answers and data on natural medicines at any time.

Healthcare providers can search for safety and effectiveness ratings for commercially available dietary supplement products, potential interactions between drugs and natural medicines, and other effectiveness ratings for natural medicines used for health conditions. The Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database (NMCD) App is available for iPhone, iPad, iPod Touch, and Android. Use your .mil email address to open an account with NMCD. See more information here. And watch for the Warfighter version coming soon!

National Cholesterol Education Month

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
September is National Cholesterol Education Month. Know your cholesterol numbers and discuss results with your healthcare provider.

September is National Cholesterol Education Month. Aim to get your cholesterol checked and discuss your results with your healthcare provider. Good cholesterol, or high-density lipoprotein (HDL), helps prevent fat and cholesterol from clogging your arteries. A higher HDL number (> 60 mg/dl of blood) is better. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is considered bad cholesterol. It carries cholesterol to your arteries and can cause them to become blocked. A lower LDL number (< 100 mg/dl) is better. High-LDL or low-HDL cholesterol levels are major risk factors for heart disease and stroke. See helpful resources from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute for helpful resources and visit this American Heart Association web page for more information.

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Can You Hear Me? An Introduction to Hearing Loss Prevention

HPRC Fitness Arena: Environment, Total Force Fitness
An CDC educational webinar covers the causes of noise- and music-related hearing loss and how to prevent it.

On September 11, join an online webinar, Can You Hear Me? An Introduction to Hearing Loss Prevention, sponsored by the CDC, to discuss the primary causes of hearing loss, and learn how to prevent it. This educational event is free; however, there are a limited number of open lines, so log in early.

Lack of exercise is just as bad as smoking

It’s no news that smoking is bad for your health, even deadly. But a new study found that lack of exercise can be just as fatal.

A new study published in the Lancet reports that one in 10 premature deaths worldwide is related to lack of exercise, equal to 5.3 million deaths in 2008. It seems as though inactivity has become as deadly as tobacco. More specifically, researchers estimated that lack of exercise causes about 6% of heart disease, 7% of Type 2 diabetes, and 10% of colon and breast cancers worldwide. To put this in perspective, the failure to spend 15-30 minutes a day doing activities such as brisk walking could shorten your life span by three to five years. Lack of physical activity is certainly a global epidemic, but it is also highly preventable. Check out HPRC's resources on how to get you and your family physically active.

Taking time to readjust

Post-deployment life takes time for everyone—not just the returning Warfighter—to adjust to.

Post-deployment life presents challenges on many fronts, including, or particularly, reestablishing relationships. The relationship between children and the returned parent often takes time to rebuild—possibly several months. This amount of time is normal, and an effort should be made to not take it personally. Rather, build positive family bonding through activities like going to the park or playing games, and allow time for the relationship to redevelop.

It’s all in the shape…body shape that is!

Body Mass Index (BMI) may be replaced in the future with “A Body Shape Index,” a better predictor of health risk due to obesity.

Body Mass Index (BMI) is a widely used indicator of obesity and, ultimately, premature death. A recent study has developed a new measurement tool that combines BMI and waist circumference (WC) called “A Body Shape Index” (ABSI). Waist circumference determines the amount of belly fat an individual has, which has been linked to a number of health conditions such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and insulin resistance, all of which increase the risk for heart disease.

A higher ABSI, and thus more belly fat, is a better indicator than BMI alone of a person’s risk of early death. More research is needed before the ABSI can be used clinically, but losing fat around the waist is a good start toward a healthier lifestyle—and a longer life. Start getting into shape to change your shape!

Consumer Reports on 10 hazards of dietary supplements

The Consumer Reports website recently posted an article outlining the potential dangers of dietary supplement products.

People take dietary supplements for lots of different reasons, and some may take them because they believe they are “natural” and therefore safe. A new article from ConsumerReports.org lists 10 hazards of taking dietary supplement products, pointing out that supplements are not risk-free.

Operation Supplement Safety (OPSS) is about to launch this summer and will answer many of your questions about Dietary Supplements. Watch for HPRC’s announcement coming soon.

Xena: Warrior Princess inspires new body armor

HPRC Fitness Arena: Environment, Total Force Fitness
Congress has directed the Pentagon to develop better-fitting body armor for female soldiers after a decade of women fighting on the front lines.

Although the military does not allow women to take part in direct combat, they routinely face the dangers of war. The Pentagon was recently pressed to develop better-fitting body armor for female soldiers, recognizing that men and women have different body shapes. Women have more curves, shorter torsos, and narrower shoulders than most of their male counterparts. The current male-based body armor creates gaps and additional pressure points that leaves service women vulnerable and reduces their performance (aiming a weapon, entering and exiting vehicles, etc).

Engineers are looking to create plates that conform to the female body, similar to the armor worn by TV’s popular Xena: Warrior Princess. There are some concerns regarding weight and protection, but so far the Army has tested eight sizes, with positive feedback from women Warfighters.