You are here: Home / HPRC Blog
RSS Feed for Total Force Fitness

HPRC Blog

Welcome to the HPRC Blog. We've got lots of information here, from quick tips to in-depth posts about detailed human performance optimization topics.

HPRC Fitness Arena: Total Force Fitness

Keep the happy in the holidays: If you’re feeling pulled, try stretching

As you work on your happiness this holiday season, remember that it’s not just a mind thing; incorporate the physical activity of stretching too.

HPRC continues it series on keeping the happy in holidays, as last week we focused on practicing acceptance. This week, a simple tip: If you’re feeling pulled in a hundred different directions or have been too busy to simply sit and relax, find five minutes to stretch—both your body and your mind. In addition to being an important component of fitness, stretching can also help quiet your mind from the stress of the holidays. Try this basic stretching routine from the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM). While you’re at it, practice some of the other skills described in this series to foster happiness: examining your thoughts and practicing gratitude, acceptance, and optimism. Your body and mind will thank you.

HPRC’s website has more ideas on mind-body skills you can try this holiday season and New Year.

The Nutrition Facts label—a Warfighter’s best friend

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
Learn how to understand and use the information on the Nutrition Facts label—including serving sizes, calories, and more!

The Nutrition Facts panel on a food label can be a Warfighter’s best friend when trying to decide what to eat for optimal performance. That’s because it provides you all the information you need to compare the nutritional content and value of foods and make good choices for your health and performance.

The Nutrition Facts label answers these questions about a food:

  • How big is a serving?
  • How many calories does it have?
  • Does it contain nutrients that I should get less (or more) of?
  • How does it fit into my overall nutrition goals?
  • What percentage of key nutrients does it provide?

For tips on how to use and understand the information on a Nutrition Facts label, check out this easy guide from the Food and Drug Administration. Although label reading can be challenging at first, with practice you’ll become an expert at using the Nutrition Facts label as a helpful tool for following a healthy, balanced diet.

Water pollution and birth defects

HPRC Fitness Arena: Environment, Total Force Fitness
New study from Centers for Disease Control link previously contaminated water to birth defects.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) confirmed what has been suspected for a long time: Previously contaminated tap water at U.S. Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune was linked to serious birth defects in babies born between 1968 and 1985.

Pregnant women on base were drinking tap water primarily contaminated by chemicals from an off-base dry-cleaning facility. Other chemicals from underground storage tanks, industrial spills, and waste-disposal sites were also detected in the water.

The water wells on base were shut down in 1985, but the damage had already been done. Pregnant women at Camp Lejuene were four times more likely to have babies with serious birth defects (such as spina bifida) as well as a slightly higher risk of developing childhood cancers.

The Veterans Administration continues to provide compensation for those affected by this exposure.

Keep the happy in holidays: Practice acceptance

Accepting the things that invade your thoughts when you can’t avoid them or control them can help you keep happy this holiday season.

Last time we highlighted being aware of possible depression in those around you. This week, as we continue our series on keeping happy in the holidays, try practicing acceptance of the things you can’t control or avoid.

Problems can arise when you try to avoid thoughts or feelings rather than noticing them as they come and go. Instead of avoiding them, try to note your thoughts or feelings, accept them, and keep moving forward rather than dwelling on them. If you need or want to think about something further, pick a good time and place to think it through later. But if it’s outside your control, practicing acceptance can help separate the things you can control from those you can’t—and help you find some peace this holiday season.

Five tips for surviving holiday parties

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
Follow these simple strategies to avoid overindulging at holiday parties.

Holiday parties provide opportunities to relax and enjoy good food and good times with family, friends, and colleagues. But they also can derail your weight and fitness goals. Buffet tables laden with calorie-rich treats and beverages can weaken the resolve of even the most committed folks. To keep yourself on track, remember these tips:

  • Never go to a party hungry. Eat a protein-rich food before you go. Protein foods tell your brain that you’re satisfied and help you avoid overindulging. Low-fat milk or yogurt or a handful of nuts are great choices.
  • Follow the MyPlate strategies for filling your party plate: Fill half your plate with fruits and vegetables then fill the rest with whole grains and lean protein such as fish or chicken.
  • Choose wine over fancy mixed drinks or beer, and be sure to drink in moderation: one drink for women and two drinks for men. Sip slowly to make your drink last through the evening.
  • If it’s a potluck, you really are in luck. Offer to bring a healthy salad or entrée, and fill your plate with your own delicious creation.
  • Don’t waste your calories (and taste buds) on desserts that you don’t absolutely love. Choose your favorite and then share it with a friend. You’ll eat slower while you and your friend chat, and cherish the moment as much as the sweet!

Keep the happy in holidays: Be aware of depression in those around you

If you or a loved one is feeling less than joyful this holiday season, reach out and get help.

Continuing HPRC’s series on keeping the happy in the holidays, last week we “focused on the positive.” This week, learn what the signs of depression are, and make sure you know how everyone in your family is doing.

Depression is not something that you can just snap out of. It can impact a person in many ways and can range from mild to severe. According to the American Psychological Association, “Depression is more than just sadness.” Symptoms can range from lack of interest to thoughts of suicide, so learn what to watch for. Check out this factsheet that details the signs and symptoms of depression and another on “Taking Charge of Depression” that includes helpful strategies. Depression is treatable with professional help; don’t isolate yourself and don’t let others do so.

For more information on depression, check out the suicide prevention section of HPRC’s website.

Keep the happy in the holidays: Focus on the positive

Another tip in this holiday season’s quest for happiness: Learn to be optimistic by focusing on the opportunities and possibilities in life.

Last week we focused on being a gratitude-seeker this holiday season. This week’s tip is to focus on the positive. Optimistic Warfighters who “see the glass half-full” are less impacted by warzone stress, experience fewer mental health issues, and exhibit better health and resilience overall. The Defense Centers of Excellence (DCoE) defines optimism as “a set of beliefs that helps to focus your attention and behavior on the opportunities and possibilities of life.” Everyone falls victim to negative or “the grass is greener” thinking at times, but negative thoughts create more negative thoughts. Learn to stay realistically positive. Optimistic thoughts are contagious too, so you’ll be passing on positivity! The Comprehensive Soldier & Family Fitness program calls focusing on the positive a “hunt for the good stuff.”

You can learn optimism in a variety of ways, such as focusing on what’s positive and possible, taking advantage of opportunities that arise, and developing realistic expectations about outcomes. DCoE has specific suggestions on how to accomplish realistic optimism. And for more Mind Tactics to promote resilience, check out HPRC’s Mental Resilience section.

Dinner in a pill?

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
It would be great if you could meet all your nutritional needs just by popping a pill. Or would it?

In a 1960s TV cartoon series, George Jetson of The Jetsons simply popped a pill when he wanted to eat. “Dinner in a pill” was promised as the food of the future. So why hasn’t technology delivered on its promise? Simply put, no dietary supplement can reproduce the aromas, flavors, textures, or nutritional value of oven-roasted turkey, crusty, fresh-baked bread, juicy ripe pineapple, fragrant hot tea, or any other wholesome, delicious, performance-enhancing real food or beverage. And substituting dietary supplements for real food won’t help performance either – check out our video here. So skip supplements—not meals. To learn more about how real foods should come before dietary supplements, check out HPRC’s article in Operation Supplement Safety (OPSS).

Garbage in, garbage out

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
When it comes to optimizing your performance through nutrition, it’s important to choose high-quality fuels and nutrients.

The phrase “Garbage in, garbage out” was coined first by computer experts back in the 1960s. Since then, the phrase has gained a wider usage—even to the world of performance nutrition. Providing your body with high-quality fuels and nutrients is crucial to optimizing your performance. Like the poorly fueled runner in HPRC’s video, you’re likely to find that a diet of high-fat or sugary foods and drinks (“garbage in”) produces less than optimal results (“garbage out”). Instead, choose wholesome foods such as lean meats and fish, fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains, and low-fat dairy products, which provide high-quality fuels and nutrients.

Keep the happy in holidays: Check your money assumptions

Keep the happy in the holidays this year by examining the assumptions you have about money and the holidays. This tip will help you learn to re-evaluate your thinking.

Check your money assumptions

Continuing our series on keeping the happy in the holidays this year, this week’s tip is to check your money assumptions. Finances can be strained during the holidays. This is not just an emotional problem, but how you think about money can affect you emotionally. Do you find yourself thinking, “I must give my family as good a Christmas as I had as a kid” or “I should be able to buy my kids whatever they want”? The fact is, you may like things to be different, but must or should they? Get rid of words such as “must” or “should” and focus instead on thoughts such as “What can I afford?” and “Are there ways I can make the holidays special without spending a lot of money?” Then notice how you feel without the constraints of what you must or should do. Instead, give yourself permission to give your family the holiday you can afford this year.

For more information on managing your money, check out HPRC’s articles on creating a budget and credit reports.

RSS Feed for Total Force Fitness