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Alerts

RegenESlim Appetite Control Capsules voluntarily recalled due to the presence of DMAA.

FDA warns consumers about caffeine powder. 

FDA advises consumers to stop using any supplement products labeled as OxyElite Pro or VERSA-1. Please see the following advisories: FDA -10/08/13, FDA - 10/11/13 and CDC - 10/08/13.

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Announcements

New article on reporting side effects of supplements
Just published in The New England Journal of Medicine: A recent article brings up dietary supplement issues you need to be aware of and discusses how dietary supplement side effects could be monitored better. A PDF of the April 3rd article is available free online.

3rd International Congress on Soldiers’ Physical Performance
August 18-21, 2014
The ICSPP delivers innovative scientific programming on soldiers’ physical performance with experts from around the world.

DMAA list updated for April 2014

Fueling Performance Photo Campaign
Share photos of how you fuel your performance and be featured on our Facebook page!

Dietary supplement module
Earn continuing education credits (if eligible) for this two-hour online module.

Operation LiveWell

Performance Triad

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HPRC Blog

Welcome to the HPRC Blog. We've got lots of information here, from quick tips to in-depth posts about detailed human performance optimization topics.

HPRC Fitness Arena: Total Force Fitness

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Sleep to live longer

HPRC Fitness Arena:
Getting a good night's sleep is important for health.

One way to lengthen your life is to sleep! Recent evidence suggests that men who have difficulty falling asleep, maintaining sleep, or only sleep for short periods of time may be at a higher risk of dying. In the study, men who reported to have insomnia or had insufficient sleep were much more likely to die over a 14-year period. Reduce your risk of death from all causes by sleeping!

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Herbal supplements face new scrutiny

HPRC Fitness Arena:
There is a growing trend in the U.S. of consumers using a variety of dietary supplements in hopes of getting healthier, warding off disease and easing symptoms of various conditions. A recent Wall Street Journal article reports that the federal government is stepping up research into the safety and effectiveness of a wide range of products to help consumers make more informed choices about supplements.

There is a growing trend in the U.S. of consumers using a variety of dietary supplements in hopes of getting healthier, warding off disease and easing symptoms of various conditions.

In a September 14, 2010 article, The Wall Street Journal reports that the federal government is stepping up research into the safety and effectiveness of a wide range of products to help consumers make more informed choices about supplements. The article in full-text can be accessed here.

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Eat chocolate – in moderation!

HPRC Fitness Arena:
You've heard that chocolate is good for you. But how much is too much?

A recent study found that while eating chocolate frequently and in large amounts did not appear to have a protective effect against heart failure, moderate chocolate consumption was linked to lower risks of heart failure. Women who ate one to two small portions of high-quality dark chocolate per week had a 32 percent lower risk of developing heart failure. Those who had one to three servings per month had a 26 percent lower risk, while women who ate at least one serving daily or more showed no improvements.

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Marines address fitness testing

HPRC Fitness Arena:
Failing a fitness test can get a Marine passed over for promotion,perhaps ending career hopes. According to an article from KVOA.com based in Tucson, AZ, there is growing pressure to hold marines to a higher standard for physical fitness and combat readiness.

Failing a fitness test can get a Marine passed over for promotion, perhaps ending career hopes. According to this article from KVOA.com based in Tucson, AZ, there is growing pressure to hold marines to a higher standard for physical fitness and combat readiness. In response, the Marine Corps Semper Fit program is investing millions in new gyms with functional workout rooms, recreation programs, and nutrition classes.

Functional Movement screening might be a better assessment of total fitness.

HPRC Fitness Arena:
When you’re in the military, being fit is part of the job – that has never changed. Neither, it seems, has the Physical Readiness (PRT) Test.

Are PRTs still accurate assessments of physical fitness levels?  The days of calisthenics and running several miles for exercise are gone. Comfort Zones and gyms on- or off-base are filled with exercise toys such as cable cross machines, Roman benches, kettlebells, and miles of cardiovascular equipment. Most military personnel are exercising with the latest technology, or at least with free weights. Shouldn’t PRTs utilize the most current knowledge of functional exercise and movement?

“Functional movement” is defined as real-world biomechanics of body movement. Sit-ups and push-ups are not functional; they show strength and/or flexibility, but not true overall fitness.

Gray Cook’s Functional Movement Screening (FMS), however, assesses the quality of seven functional movements to determine a persons’ symmetry, grading each movement (21 being a perfect score). FMS might be a better assessment in terms of a person’s total fitness level. Most studies using FMS have evaluated the prediction of injury rates based on the level of symmetry (for example: Military Joe shows rotary stability in the left shoulder but not in the right – the asymmetry of his shoulders most likely predicts injury when climbing walls in theater).

An unpublished study by COL Francis O’Connor, MD on injury prediction in Marine Corps Officer candidates (MC) found that those who scored 14 or higher (out of 21) had a lower injury rate. A study on NFL players also had similar findings.

Should the military re-evaluate its PRTs in terms of functional movement or should it stay with its current program? Contact us here at the HPRC if you have thoughts to share.

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Check out "Life’s Simple 7"™

HPRC Fitness Arena:
An online resource by the American Heart Association lists steps that are crucial to our health.

The Simple 7™ is an easy way to figure out how to achieve good health. This online resource, provided by the American Heart Association, lists seven steps that are crucial to our health. We list their steps for you below:

  1. Don’t smoke.
  2. Maintain a healthy weight.
  3. Engage in physical activity.
  4. Eat a healthy diet.
  5. Manage your blood pressure.
  6. Take charge of your cholesterol.
  7. Keep your blood glucose at healthy levels.

With Life’s Simple 7™, you'll find out where you stand, how you're doing, and also get you your own personal heart score and health plan.

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Make the next potluck a healthy one!

HPRC Fitness Arena:
Potlucks can be healthy gatherings, too.

Instead of asking your friends to bring their usual comfort foods to dinner at your house, suggest that everyone bring a healthy option instead. Place caloric restrictions or assign different people to fruit, vegetable, or meat dishes. This will help get everyone involved in healthier eating habits.

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Go to “workout hour!”

HPRC Fitness Arena:
Hanging out with your friends doesn't have to be unhealthy.

Hanging out with friends may include habits that oppose your health goals. Instead of skipping out on quality time with them, invite them to participate in an activity like a group cycling class that will get everyone moving. A healthy social life contributes to good health, so get the group moving!

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Take the stairs, not the elevator

HPRC Fitness Arena:
Improve your cardiovascular health on the stairs.

A few minutes a day of stair climbing can improve your cardiovascular health, a recent study finds. A study of sedentary college-aged women who walked 199 stair steps a day the first week, and who worked up to six ascents, or climbs, a day by the sixth week, were significantly more fit (heart rate, oxygen uptake, blood lactate levels and increased HDL) by the end than in the beginning.

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Runners: How to pace yourself on hills

HPRC Fitness Arena:
A study published this year in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise suggests that most runners make two key mistakes: They try to run too fast uphill and don’t run fast enough downhill.

Woman running

In a study published this year in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise,  the research suggests that most runners make two key mistakes: They try to run too fast uphill and don’t run fast enough downhill. The Globe and Mail (Toronto) has an article that asks the questions on the best way to run hills. Access the article here.