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Alerts

RegenESlim Appetite Control Capsules voluntarily recalled due to the presence of DMAA.

FDA warns consumers about caffeine powder. 

FDA advises consumers to stop using any supplement products labeled as OxyElite Pro or VERSA-1. Please see the following advisories: FDA -10/08/13, FDA - 10/11/13 and CDC - 10/08/13.

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Announcements

New article on reporting side effects of supplements
Just published in The New England Journal of Medicine: A recent article brings up dietary supplement issues you need to be aware of and discusses how dietary supplement side effects could be monitored better. A PDF of the April 3rd article is available free online.

3rd International Congress on Soldiers’ Physical Performance
August 18-21, 2014
The ICSPP delivers innovative scientific programming on soldiers’ physical performance with experts from around the world.

DMAA list updated for April 2014

Fueling Performance Photo Campaign
Share photos of how you fuel your performance and be featured on our Facebook page!

Dietary supplement module
Earn continuing education credits (if eligible) for this two-hour online module.

Operation LiveWell

Performance Triad

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Filed under: BMI

Get moving to help manage PTSD

Research has found that those with PTSD are at higher risk for cardiovascular disease; for some, exercise might be a great addition to other types of treatment.

The physical and emotional stress associated with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) can raise your blood pressure and cholesterol and increase body mass index, all of which are risk factors for heart disease. Veterans suffering from PTSD are more than twice as likely to die from a heart attack than those without PTSD. While the exact relationship between PTSD and heart disease is not fully understood, we know that regular exercise can help prevent heart disease and other risk factors, which could be helpful for those with PTSD. Some types of exercise can be effective in reducing psychological symptoms associated with PTSD and also can play a role in reducing unhealthy behaviors such as smoking, being overweight, and physical inactivity—sometimes byproducts of trying to cope. If you think that exercise might help you or a loved one cope with PTSD, speak with your healthcare provider to assess how much and what kind of exercise is best!

It’s all in the shape…body shape that is!

Body Mass Index (BMI) may be replaced in the future with “A Body Shape Index,” a better predictor of health risk due to obesity.

Body Mass Index (BMI) is a widely used indicator of obesity and, ultimately, premature death. A recent study has developed a new measurement tool that combines BMI and waist circumference (WC) called “A Body Shape Index” (ABSI). Waist circumference determines the amount of belly fat an individual has, which has been linked to a number of health conditions such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and insulin resistance, all of which increase the risk for heart disease.

A higher ABSI, and thus more belly fat, is a better indicator than BMI alone of a person’s risk of early death. More research is needed before the ABSI can be used clinically, but losing fat around the waist is a good start toward a healthier lifestyle—and a longer life. Start getting into shape to change your shape!

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Determine your ideal body weight

HPRC Fitness Arena:
Your optimal body weight depends on many factors; ACE offers information that will help you determine what is ideal for you.

Body weight may be used as a measure of overall health by calculating your body mass index (BMI) and may also be used as an indicator of your health risks, particularly if you have more body fat than recommended. Read this answer from the American Council on Exercise to learn more about your ideal body weight. The Army’s Hooah 4 Health website also has online calculators for body mass index and optimal body weight.

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