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Got (chocolate) milk?

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
It’s important to replenish your body after working out. Chocolate milk provides essential nutrients and is inexpensive, easy to find, and tasty.

Need a great post-workout beverage? Try drinking a glass or two of chocolate milk during the first 15-60 minutes after exercise to replenish glycogen stores and repair muscles.

Why chocolate milk? The carbohydrate-to-protein ratio in chocolate milk is roughly four-to-one, the best ratio for replenishing glycogen stores while providing adequate protein for muscle building and repair. One eight-ounce glass of chocolate milk provides about 200 calories. It provides carbohydrate, protein, electrolytes such as potassium and sodium, and essential vitamins and minerals such as vitamin D and calcium in an easily digestible liquid form that is inexpensive and readily available, and it tastes good! But be sure to choose heart-healthy low-fat versions.

For those who are lactose intolerant or allergic to dairy products, or for those who simply prefer a plant-based diet, fortified chocolate soymilk is a great alternative.

Had enough to drink?

HPRC Fitness Arena: Mind Tactics, Total Force Fitness
Drinking too much alcohol affects your health, your job, and your family. But how much is too much? For optimum Warfighter performance, you need to know.

Have you ever wondered what’s considered “too much to drink? According to the American Psychological Association, a “relatively harmless” or “moderate” amount is no more than two drinks a day for men and one for women and older people. One drink is defined as 12 ounces of beer, five ounces of wine, or 1.5 ounces of spirits.

However, anyone who continually drinks alcoholic beverages despite repeated negative consequences is guilty of “alcohol abuse.” Those who can’t stop drinking once they start or who have to drink more to get the same effect—a phenomenon called “developing tolerance”—are alcohol dependent. This pattern of drinking, known as alcoholism, damages a person’s health, relationships, and ability to work. However, there is a category known as the “functional alcoholic.” Such people remain highly functional, with their jobs, homes, and families intact, making the problem difficult to identify.

To see how your own drinking habits stack up, visit Afterdeployment.org for an assessment of whether you or someone you care about has a problem with alcohol. They offer resources and information on how to address alcohol-related issues. HPRC also provides more information on alcohol use and abuse, including service-specific programs.

Air Force studying caffeinated drinks

Air Force conducting study on 12 bases on the use of caffeinated drinks.

The Air Force is conducting a study on the use of energy drinks among active-duty Air Force personnel and civilians. According to the Army and Air Force Exchange Service (AAFES), Monster Energy was the top-selling cold beverage last year in the AAFES worldwide, and due to continuing concerns about the effects of energy drink consumption, the Air Force has started its own survey that targets 12 bases in Europe and the U.S. For the complete story, read the article in Stars and Stripes.

The cost of eating well

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
Be careful how you spend your food dollars. The best “meal deal” can actually be healthy whole foods!

Do you think nutritious foods are expensive? Think again. A cost-per-calorie comparison of the prices of fat- and sugar-laden convenience foods to the prices of nutritious whole foods showed the convenience foods coming up short.

A study conducted in a low-income area of Baltimore, Maryland, revealed that a diet based primarily on convenience foods from fast-food restaurants cost 24% more than a diet based on whole foods purchased in a grocery store. Of course, prices vary between seasons and geographic locations, but the message was clear: Don’t be fooled by “dollar menus” and “meal deals.”

Here are some more tips to stretch your food dollars:

  • Meats: Buy lean cuts of meat, poultry, and fish on sale and freeze for later use. (Use freezer wrap for long-term storage.)
  • Fruits and vegetables: Not only are fruits and vegetables less expensive when they are in season, the ones in season are freshest and have the best flavor. Take advantage of lower prices on apples in autumn, kale in winter, peas in spring, and strawberries in summer, for example.
  • Processed foods: Cereal, low-fat pasta sauces, and other slightly processed foods can be healthful choices, but name brands can be expensive. Store brands are often excellent quality and typically cost less.
  • Snacks and beverages: Opt for inexpensive (and healthy) snack choices such as popcorn, dried fruit, or peanuts. Milk and juice provide needed nutrients without the “empty” calories found in sodas and beer.
  • Coupons, coupons, coupons: They’re like free money.

With a little time and planning you can provide your family with healthy, nutritious meals and save money.

Relaxation drinks: Problematic for teens?

Are relaxation drinks safe for children and adolescents? Recent reports highlight possible problems.

A number of relaxation beverages have been introduced into the market and are now available to consumers of any age from convenience stores, college campuses, and online vendors. There are recent reports of negative side effects in children and teens from the consumption of these drinks. There are two significant issues with relaxation drinks: First, some of their ingredients, particularly melatonin, have not gone through the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) process required for all food ingredients to be designated as safe or “generally recognized as safe” (GRAS). Second, other ingredients such as valerian and caffeine do not have established serving sizes or doses for this type of use. An additional concern is that it is unknown how ingredients might interact. Parents should be concerned about this.

It also may be hard to tell the difference between these drinks and those that have been recognized as safe because their bottles and labels are sometimes similar. A typical consumer may not realize which drinks contain ingredients that might have negative effects. Therefore it’s important to be aware what is in these drinks and to read all labels carefully. Many of these drinks have warnings on their labels that they are not intended for children. For more information about relaxation drinks, their ingredients, and their effects, check out HPRC’s article. Also, visit OPSS (Operation Supplement Safety) for more information about dietary supplement safety and specific ingredients.

Remember, there’s no magic beverage for relaxing or reducing stress. Instead, address those issues in order to get to the bottom of the stress you or your teen might be experiencing. There are strategies that you or your child can use to relax and de-stress in a healthy way. For even more ideas, visit the stress control section of HPRC’s website.

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