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Alerts

RegenESlim Appetite Control Capsules voluntarily recalled due to the presence of DMAA.

FDA warns consumers about caffeine powder. 

FDA advises consumers to stop using any supplement products labeled as OxyElite Pro or VERSA-1. Please see the following advisories: FDA -10/08/13, FDA - 10/11/13 and CDC - 10/08/13.

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Announcements

New article on reporting side effects of supplements
Just published in The New England Journal of Medicine: A recent article brings up dietary supplement issues you need to be aware of and discusses how dietary supplement side effects could be monitored better. A PDF of the April 3rd article is available free online.

3rd International Congress on Soldiers’ Physical Performance
August 18-21, 2014
The ICSPP delivers innovative scientific programming on soldiers’ physical performance with experts from around the world.

DMAA list updated for April 2014

Fueling Performance Photo Campaign
Share photos of how you fuel your performance and be featured on our Facebook page!

Dietary supplement module
Earn continuing education credits (if eligible) for this two-hour online module.

Operation LiveWell

Performance Triad

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Filed under: Children

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Food dyes and hyperactivity: Is there a link?

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In the debate over food dyes and hyperactivity in children, the FDA feels there is not enough evidence to support any action.

Red 40, Yellow 5, Yellow 6, and other dyes are artificial colorings allowed in foods in the U.S., yet there is a long-standing debate over whether food dyes contribute to hyperactivity in children. The Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) Food Advisory Committee met the last week of March and determined that there is not enough evidence to support the link between food dyes and hyperactivity in children. For now, there will be no warning labels on food products containing dyes.

Family Matters: Military Youth Risk-Taking Behavior

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In a study of military youth, risk-taking behavior was compared to national and state averages. How did they rank?

In a study of military youth, risk-taking behavior was compared to national and state averages. The researchers found that risk-taking behaviors among military youth—specifically, sexual activity and substance abuse—were much lower than national and state averages. However, there were still reports of risk-taking behaviors among military youth, so the authors caution not to misinterpret this information—even military children still need guidance. For more information on risk-taking behaviors, visit the HPRC's Mind Tactics "Performance Degraders" section.

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Boost your child's resilience

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Children who have resilience are better able to cope with stress.

The way that parents behave under stress, and interact with their children on a daily basis, has a profound influence on a child’s resilience or the ability to bounce back from stress. Parents can improve resilience by teaching the following skills to their children:

  1. Spiritual: Parents can help children feel a sense of uniqueness, purpose, and perseverance by providing a spiritual foundation, framework, or belief in something bigger than just the child’s universe.
  2. Emotional: Parents can model and foster positive mood management; discuss feelings with them and help them learn how to deal with emotions, both positive and negative.
  3. Physical: Parents can practice and teach positive health habits that include healthful food choices and physical activity.
  4. Behavioral: Parents can model, coach, and teach positive behaviors that help foster their child’s belief that they can behave well and make positive choices.
  5. Cognitive: Parents can enhance a child’s self-esteem and help them develop cognitive and academic skills by monitoring and checking their homework, and promoting problem solving skills that teach them to proactively solve problems and develop independent thinking skills.

Click here to read an abstract summary of this research.

White House initiatives to support military families

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The White House has announced new initiatives to support military families in four key areas: overall well-being, education and development of military children, career advancement opportunities for military spouses, and improved childcare.

Recently, the White House announced new initiatives to support military families in four key areas: overall well-being, education and development of military children, career advancement opportunities for military spouses, and improved availability of quality childcare. Multiple agencies have partnered to support these efforts with the following goals:

  • Focus on suicide trends to offer targeted preventive training and counseling to meet the mental health needs of military families;
  • Offer child care resources;
  • Combat homelessness;
  • Expand communication across rural communities;
  • Expand career opportunities for military spouses;
  • Expand access to financial aid and needs of military students; and
  • Expand facilities to help military families recover, integrate, and support their youth during and after deployment cycles.

    Sesame Street helps parents deploy

    HPRC Fitness Arena:
    The Sesame Street Workshop program on Preparing for Deployment offers families strategies for dealing with deployment.

    Having children help out with dinner and keeping the same routine when a parent is deployed; marking a calendar with an X for every day their parent is away, and having a great support system are just a few of the strategies that the Sesame Street Workshop's program on "Preparing for Deployment" offers.

    They also have age-appropriate workshops for younger children on "When Families Grieve," "Coping with Changes," and "Homecomings Family Routines."

    Communication tips for parents

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    The American Psychological Association offers communication tips for parents:

    • Make yourself available to your children to talk, listen or do things together.
    • Let your children know you are listening.
    • Express your opinion in a way that your child can hear your message.
    • Remember that children often learn how to deal with emotions, solve problems, and work through stressful situations from their parents.

    Making step-families work well

    HPRC Fitness Arena:
    If you have children from a previous relationship and are building a new one, here are some tips to reduce conflict.

    If you have children from a previous relationship and are building a new one, consider discussing these issues to reduce conflict:

    • Decide together where you should live and how you will manage your money.
    • Close the door on your last relationship; resolve feelings and issues from your past relationship.
    • Determine step parenting roles and responsibilities.
    • Establish rules and boundaries for the blended family.

    The American Psychological Association suggests that you make each other a priority by having regular dates and taking trips without the children.

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    Have your children drink more water for good health

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    Your child may not be drinking enough water to stay healthy.

    Dietary data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES, 2005-2006) for children between ages two through 19 suggest that children may not be drinking enough water for optimal health. The study also found that children and adolescents may be getting as much as two-thirds of their total water intake with their main meals. Try replacing non-nutritious beverages like sodas with nutritious beverages (or better yet, plain water) at meal time. This  could have a positive impact on the diet, weight, and health of your children.

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    Kids need their nighttime sleep

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    A good night's sleep helps your child stay healthy.

    Recent research published in the Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine journal found that too little nighttime sleep in young children may be a risk factor for obesity. Napping did not appear to be a substitute; experts recommend letting your children get enough sleep at night. You may be reducing their risk for obesity later in life!

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