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Alerts

FDA warns consumers about caffeine powder. 

FDA advises consumers to stop using any supplement products labeled as OxyElite Pro or VERSA-1. Please see the following advisories: FDA -10/08/13, FDA - 10/11/13 and CDC - 10/08/13.

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Announcements

New article on reporting side effects of supplements
Just published in The New England Journal of Medicine: A recent article brings up dietary supplement issues you need to be aware of and discusses how dietary supplement side effects could be monitored better. A PDF of the April 3rd article is available free online.

3rd International Congress on Soldiers’ Physical Performance
August 18-21, 2014
The ICSPP delivers innovative scientific programming on soldiers’ physical performance with experts from around the world.

DMAA list updated for April 2014

Fueling Performance Photo Campaign
Share photos of how you fuel your performance and be featured on our Facebook page!

Dietary supplement module
Earn continuing education credits (if eligible) for this two-hour online module.

Operation LiveWell

Performance Triad

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Filed under: Cholesterol

Operation Live Well

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
Operation Live Well, a recently launched campaign from the Department of Defense, seeks to promote and sustain the health of service members, families, veterans, and retirees.

Are you looking for ways to promote your health or the health of your family? Operation Live Well, a DoD initiative, provides a wealth of information each month on a targeted topic. September is National Cholesterol Education Month and National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month. High blood cholesterol puts you at risk for heart disease, the number one killer of men and women in the United States. Encouraging family physical fitness can instill a lifetime of healthy habits and decrease risks for problems such as heart disease, diabetes, and certain types of cancer. Check back often to see new topics and explore methods to improve and sustain your well-being!

Get moving to help manage PTSD

Research has found that those with PTSD are at higher risk for cardiovascular disease; for some, exercise might be a great addition to other types of treatment.

The physical and emotional stress associated with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) can raise your blood pressure and cholesterol and increase body mass index, all of which are risk factors for heart disease. Veterans suffering from PTSD are more than twice as likely to die from a heart attack than those without PTSD. While the exact relationship between PTSD and heart disease is not fully understood, we know that regular exercise can help prevent heart disease and other risk factors, which could be helpful for those with PTSD. Some types of exercise can be effective in reducing psychological symptoms associated with PTSD and also can play a role in reducing unhealthy behaviors such as smoking, being overweight, and physical inactivity—sometimes byproducts of trying to cope. If you think that exercise might help you or a loved one cope with PTSD, speak with your healthcare provider to assess how much and what kind of exercise is best!

National Cholesterol Education Month

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
September is National Cholesterol Education Month. Know your cholesterol numbers and discuss results with your healthcare provider.

September is National Cholesterol Education Month. Aim to get your cholesterol checked and discuss your results with your healthcare provider. Good cholesterol, or high-density lipoprotein (HDL), helps prevent fat and cholesterol from clogging your arteries. A higher HDL number (> 60 mg/dl of blood) is better. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is considered bad cholesterol. It carries cholesterol to your arteries and can cause them to become blocked. A lower LDL number (< 100 mg/dl) is better. High-LDL or low-HDL cholesterol levels are major risk factors for heart disease and stroke. See helpful resources from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute for helpful resources and visit this American Heart Association web page for more information.

Know your cholesterol numbers

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
Do you know what your HDL and LDL numbers are?

Good cholesterol, or high-density lipoprotein (HDL), helps prevent fat and cholesterol from clogging your arteries. A higher HDL number (> 60 mg/dl of blood) is better. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is considered bad cholesterol. It carries cholesterol to your arteries and can cause them to become blocked. A lower LDL number (< 100 mg/dl) is better. High-LDL or low-HDL cholesterol levels are major risk factors for heart disease and stroke. Visit this American Hearth Association web page for more information.

Tips to lower your cholesterol

HPRC Fitness Arena:
To keep your cholesterol in check, eat smaller portions, include more fruits and vegetables in your diet, and eat more fish.

To keep your cholesterol in check, eat smaller portions, include more fruits and vegetables in your diet, and eat more fish. Consider starting your day with whole grains. Include nuts as snacks or in your meals. Use olive or canola oil rather than butter. Include more beans and fewer potatoes. Exercise, manage your stress, and follow your doctor’s advice. Check out the Lowering Cholesterol Slideshow for more details.

Eggs and cholesterol


Eggs are a good source of protein but the yolks are high in cholesterol; egg whites are cholesterol-free. A diet high in cholesterol may contribute to high blood cholesterol levels and increase your risk of heart disease. Experts recommend that you limit your cholesterol intake to less than 300 mg a day if you are a healthy individual and less than 200 mg a day if you have heart condition. Since one egg has about 213 mg of cholesterol, consider limiting other sources of cholesterol on days you eat eggs. The Mayoclinic offers tips to reduce cholesterol intake.

 

 

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