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Filed under: Coping strategies

Online tool for triumphing over difficulties

HPRC Fitness Arena: Mind Tactics, Total Force Fitness
There’s a new website for Warfighters and Veterans that can help you face and overcome life’s challenges – especially useful for the upcoming holiday season.

With the holidays upon us, the number of problems that you have to solve might be kicking up a notch or two. A Department of Defense and Veterans Affairs initiative, Moving Forward, has a website that gives you tools for “overcoming life’s challenges.” As you encounter challenges this holiday season, give their module a test run—it takes you through a step-by-step process for solving problems. They suggest:

  1. Define the problem and set goals
  2. Come up with alternative solutions.
  3. Pick one solution
  4. Put your solution into action and analyze the outcome.

HPRC’s website also has useful information on stress management.

Distract yourself from pain

HPRC Fitness Arena: Mind Tactics, Total Force Fitness
Distraction can help Warfighters cope with pain and other difficulties.

Ever notice that pain isn’t as bad when you are doing something: hanging out with friends; playing video games; taking a walk? Simply put, distraction works—sort of like having a busy signal for your brain. Distraction may not have the other benefits of exercise and meditation, but it can help you manage pain and other problems such as depression, anxiety, PTSD, and anger.

A couple tips:

  • Choose healthy distractions that make your life better, such as exercise, fostering good friendships, art...
  • Don’t use too much distraction. Save it for when it can benefit you the most. If you use it too much, it loses its effect.

Break down your problems, not yourself

HPRC Fitness Arena: Mind Tactics, Total Force Fitness
When problems seem larger than life, try breaking them down in sections to tackle one at a time.

Dealing with the stress of deployment and re-adjusting to home life post-deployment can be tough. It’s important to focus on managing your stress, finding ways to cope, and building your resilience. According to Real Warriors, you can get “behaviorally fit” by managing stress and reaching out to others. Among several tips offered is how to deal with problems as they come—head on. Don’t avoid discussing tough issues or finding ways to deal with them. For problems that seem too big, try breaking them down into smaller, manageable steps. For issues that you still find yourself struggling with even after breaking them down, the best bet is to get help from a professional, friend, or supportive family member.

Managing family stress

Stress can create a ripple effect in families; learning ways to effectively manage your stress can have numerous benefits.

It’s no news that stress can take a toll on your life and can affect your relationships—which may already be under a strain from repeated deployments and combat exposure. But unmanaged stress doesn’t affect only you; it can create a ripple effect in families, which is why learning to effectively manage stress is so important. Deep breathing, mindfulness, meditation, guided imagery, and body scanning are just a few strategies that can help you relax, manage your stress, and help you live your life better—and everyone in the family can learn and benefit from them.

For more tips on how to manage stress, check out HPRC’s Stress Control section.

Look over there! Diverting deployment stress

Distractions are a great way to keep a child’s mind off of deployment stressors.

Distractions are a great way to help reduce stress, as they allow a child or teen to take his or her mind off of deployment—to a point. A great idea for parents is to provide plenty of opportunities for social activities (i.e., sports, clubs, etc.). Many of the sources of stress from a deployment have no ready solution, so distractions can be helpful. Providing events that families can partake in together (i.e., bowling, arts and crafts, etc.) are a great way to bring families together. Research shows that the most common forms of adolescent distractions are reading, drawing, playing computer games, listening to music, and playing with pets.

Deployments, reunions, and family roles

Deployments and reunions can cause military families to experience stress and uncertainty about family roles. Confusion can occur when family members have to take on their service member’s pre-deployment roles and responsibilities in addition to their own. Once reunited, both the service member and his or her family members should communicate openly when re-establishing previous tasks or assigning new ones.

When my own husband returned from deployment, I was thrilled but anxious as I stood on the airstrip waiting for his helicopter to arrive. I thought about all of the birthdays, holidays, and special events he had missed during his time away. I wondered what it would be like to share a home with him again after I had become so independent.

This is an experience felt at some point by most military families, and it has a name: “boundary ambiguity.” Boundary ambiguity can affect military families in two ways: ambiguous absence (during deployment) and ambiguous presence (post-deployment).

When one member of the family is deployed, the rest of the family knows that their service member is absent physically but senses psychologically that he or she is present. The family continues to focus on its service member by seeking information about his or her location and well-being. When deployment information turns out to be uncertain, feelings of hopelessness, confusion, and at times resentment may increase among family members.

As with most families, flexibility is important for military family success and happiness. When the service member leaves for deployment, the usual roles and responsibilities he or she once filled now have to be filled by the other family members. This can cause additional uncertainty because, although they still consider their loved one is a viable family member, the other spouse must take over decision-making responsibilities that affect the family unit. The spouse at home can also feel a loss of emotional support, which heightens the stress load he or she is carrying.

Additionally, once the service member has returned from deployment, the rest of the family knows that he or she is physically present yet still perceives psychologically that he or she is absent.

The reunion, although joyful, may bring about the added and unanticipated stresses of trying to get back to the family’s pre-deployment lives or adjust to new roles. Role confusion may increase if the family is not comfortable communicating with each other regarding each person's roles, responsibilities, and needs. And at the same time, the returned service member may feel disconnected and may not know how to re-engage without interfering with the family’s new roles.

Researchers of military reserve families in wartime interviewed 16 reservists and 18 family members (spouse, significant other, or parent) upon the reservists’ return from deployment, and they found that all family members experienced boundary ambiguity. Family members sought to cope with these feelings during deployment by:

  • Continuing to seek additional information from the media, even though too much information sometimes caused additional stress; and
  • Attending a military-sponsored Family Support Group (FSG) for family members of reservists, which provided emotional support.

When reunited after deployment, family members and reservists adjusted over time. Once the reservist went back to civilian employment, the family’s routines became “normalized” and roles were established. In addition, open communication about issues such as reestablishing previous tasks or assigning new ones helped to stabilize the family unit.

Once home, my husband wanted to resume certain family roles immediately, while I was hesitant to give up my new capabilities so quickly. Fortunately, after reestablishing open discussions over the next several weeks, we began to speak honestly about our preferences. Once we opened up clear lines of communication and listened to each other, our stress levels diminished. We made some compromises and were able to establish an even better household environment than we had pre-deployment.

So be flexible, take advantage of available counseling and support resources, and be patient with your spouse when reestablishing your family roles. After all, there aren’t many things more important than the happiness of your family.

Tips for helping children cope with deployment

HPRC recommends three ways to help provide youth with support during deployment.

Follow these tips to help your child cope with a parent’s deployment:

1)    Increase your knowledge/awareness of deployment-related issues.

    • Understand the various ways in which a family is affected by deployment.
    • Understand the stages of the deployment cycle.
    • Find ways to improve public awareness of the need for support within communities.

      2)    Increase your knowledge of and vigilance for depression and stress symptoms:

        • Learn to recognize signs and symptoms of depression and other mental health concerns.
        • Understand common emotional phases in children and teenagers during times of deployment.

          3)    Increase opportunities for connection and support:

            • Show concern for your child. Many teens will refuse to express their concern over a deployment but will often respond to concern shown for them.
            • Help kids form networks with peers who have gone through or are going through a parent’s deployment.
            • Provide opportunities for activities to keep children distracted.

              For more information and resources on how to support children and teens during deployment, visit the HPRC’s family skills section.

              The Military Family Fitness Model

              The Warfighter’s greatest support usually comes from his or her family, yet families also have to deal with the stress of military life. The Joint Services and the DoD have teamed up to develop a framework for additional support and resources to help families cope with the increased pace of deployment.

              Since the beginning of Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom, approximately two million U.S. troops have deployed. The operational tempo associated with these conflicts has led to longer and more frequent deployments with fewer rest periods in between. The inevitable stress is a challenge for military and civilian communities, even as families work hard to reintegrate their families and normal routines.

              In response to these ongoing demands, the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff directed the development of the Total Force Fitness (TFF) initiative, a new Department of Defense model that focuses on the health, readiness, and performance of our Warfighters. (See the Total Force Fitness section of HPRC’s website for more information on this initiative.)

              Following this initiative, a team of Joint-Service and DoD experts lead by COL Bowles of the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS) came together to create a model that promotes family fitness, resilience, and optimal well-being for service members and their families. This model, which is still in development, is called The Military Family Fitness Model (MFFM).

              The MFFM first examines stress-inducing demands placed on military and civilian families from sudden deployment and the return home. Then, looking to build on the resilience of the family, MFFM provides guidelines, skills, and resources for the individual, family, and community to protect against the negative effects of stress. As sources of stress increase, certain behaviors indicate the need for more support (e.g., family strife, children acting out, job instability for non-service members, family role conflict, non-supportive relationships outside the family, and/or domestic violence). With MFFM, families have individual, family, and community resources for additional support. The aim of the model is to foster a multi-level approach that strengthens family resilience and, as a result, Warfighter resilience.

              Individual approaches to addressing stress include breathing exercises, yoga, mindfulness exercises, and cognitive restructuring. Family strategies include developing and maintaining strong communication skills, shared family routines, and the building of support networks. The bottom line of the MFFM is that at any point along the model, individuals, families, and communities can strengthen resilience resources to promote total family resilience and fitness.

              Members of the MFFM team presented the Military Family Fitness Model at the USDA/DoD Family Resilience conference at the end of April. We encourage you to get more information on the conference presentation, read the abstract, and see the PowerPoint slides presented.

              DCoE's (Defense Centers of Excellence) report [PDF] on the Family Conference can be read here.

              HPRC at the DoD/USDA Family Resilience Conference

              HPRC Fitness Arena:
              Representatives of the HPRC, DCoE, and USUHS presented a workshop on a new model for military family fitness at a conference in April.

              The Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury (Resilience and Prevention Directorate), Uniformed Services University, and the Human Performance Resource Center ran a three-hour workshop introducing the Military Family Fitness Model at the DoD/USDA Family Resilience Conference last week (April 26-29) in Chicago, IL. The workshop focused on describing the newly developed process-oriented, multi-level model for total military family fitness, including how service members and their families, leaders, policy makers, and program managers can achieve and maintain family fitness (following the Total Force Fitness paradigm). Key aspects of the model were also described, such as family stressors, strengths, resources, and outcomes.

              Deep breathing, guided imagery, mindfulness, and cognitive restructuring were taught as practical skills that can help control family members’ stress. Guidelines were also given for family communication and problem-solving skills designed to enhance family functioning and resilience. A military case study was presented to allow participants to practice the application of the Total Family Fitness model.

              To see a copy of the workshop that was presented, click here; for more complete information, please read the abstract of the presentation.

              DCoE's (Defense Centers of Excellence) report [PDF] on the Family Conference can be read here.

              To learn more integrative mind-body strategies, visit HPRC's Mind Tactics domain and the Defense Centers of Excellence newly published paper on Mind-Body Skills for Regulating the Autonomic Nervous System.

              To learn more family strengthening strategies, visit HPRC's Family & Relationships domain.

              Presenters of the model were COL Stephen Bowles, Ph.D. (USUHS), Colanda Cato, Ph.D. (DCoE), Monique Moore, Ph.D. (DCoE), and Liz Davenport Pollock, MS, LGMFT (HPRC).

              Acknowledgements: Force Health Protection and Readiness, Psychological Health Strategic Operation; Military Community & Family Policy; Air Force Air Education and Training Command; Military Family Research Institute; and Defense Centers of Excellence.

              White House initiatives to support military families

              HPRC Fitness Arena:
              The White House has announced new initiatives to support military families in four key areas: overall well-being, education and development of military children, career advancement opportunities for military spouses, and improved childcare.

              Recently, the White House announced new initiatives to support military families in four key areas: overall well-being, education and development of military children, career advancement opportunities for military spouses, and improved availability of quality childcare. Multiple agencies have partnered to support these efforts with the following goals:

              • Focus on suicide trends to offer targeted preventive training and counseling to meet the mental health needs of military families;
              • Offer child care resources;
              • Combat homelessness;
              • Expand communication across rural communities;
              • Expand career opportunities for military spouses;
              • Expand access to financial aid and needs of military students; and
              • Expand facilities to help military families recover, integrate, and support their youth during and after deployment cycles.
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