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Alerts

FDA advises consumers to stop using any supplement products labeled as OxyElite Pro or VERSA-1. Please see the following advisories: FDA -10/08/13, FDA - 10/11/13 and CDC - 10/08/13.

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Announcements

New article on reporting side effects of supplements
Just published in The New England Journal of Medicine: A recent article brings up dietary supplement issues you need to be aware of and discusses how dietary supplement side effects could be monitored better. A PDF of the April 3rd article is available free online.

3rd International Congress on Soldiers’ Physical Performance
August 18-21, 2014
The ICSPP delivers innovative scientific programming on soldiers’ physical performance with experts from around the world.

DMAA list updated for April 2014

Fueling Performance Photo Campaign
Share photos of how you fuel your performance and be featured on our Facebook page!

Dietary supplement module
Earn continuing education credits (if eligible) for this two-hour online module.

Operation LiveWell

Performance Triad

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Filed under: DMAA

Stars and Stripes reports: Army study on DMAA will continue

The Army will continue its own study on the effects of DMAA even after the FDA sent warning letters to marketers and distributors of dietary supplement products with DMAA.

Following in the wake of the Food and Drug Administration’s warning letters to manufacturers and distributors of dietary supplements containing DMAA, the Army announced that its own study on the effects of DMAA on soldiers will continue. Read about the announcement and more in the recent Stars and Stripes article. For more information about the FDA’s action, you can read HPRC’s post, which also includes a link to the FDA news release.

FDA Warns Companies about DMAA Safety

Marketers and distributors of products containing DMAA warned by FDA.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) sent warning letters to manufacturers and distributors of dietary supplements containing 1,3-dimethylamylamine (DMAA) due to lack of safety evidence provided before marketing. The FDA states that information about the safety of DMAA as a dietary supplement ingredient has not been identified. For more information, see the FDA News Release and HPRC’s latest on Dietary Supplement Products Containing DMAA.

DMAA list updates

HPRC has again updated its list of DMAA containing products. The latest news includes New Zealand’s ban on DMAA-containing products.

The latest news on DMAA includes the New Zealand government’s ban just placed on DMAA-containing products. DMAA has already been declared a drug in Canada and is banned by the World Anti-Doping Agency, the United States Anti-doping Agency (USADA), collegiate sports teams, and most professional sports teams.

HPRC has again updated its list of DMAA-containing dietary supplements, including a number of additions as well as some products that have been discontinued or reformulated. The additions mostly represent lesser-known products that have been around a while, but surprisingly there are a couple new products too. And we have added two new “aliases” to the list of other names for DMAA. To download the list, click on this link to “Dietary Supplement Products Containing DMAA.

DMAA-containing products list updated

HPRC has updated its list of products containing DMAA to help you make informed decisions in buying dietary supplements.

HPRC recently posted a list of dietary supplement products containing DMAA. Since we originally posted this list at the end of December, some changes have occurred that deserve note. Some products are no longer available on the manufacturer’s websites, while others appear to have been reformulated to eliminate DMAA from their recipes. To download the updated list, go to the Dietary Supplements Resources page under the “Resources” tab, or just click on this link to directly access “Dietary Supplement Products Containing DMAA.”

Dietary supplements: What’s in them for you?

HPRC’s new Dietary Supplement Classification System offers information to help you decide whether a dietary supplement can help you reach your performance goals or whether it may have side effects you want to avoid.

What do you put in your body to boost your performance, increase your energy, shed pounds, build muscle, or otherwise supplement your diet? What’s in that drink, pill, or powder? What will it do for you? What will it do to you? Is it worth the risk?

More and more Warfighters are taking dietary supplements, most without being fully informed that some of the ingredients could have harmful side effects. HPRC has just unveiled its Dietary Supplement Classification System to provide this kind of information and help you make informed decisions about a particular supplement. To start exploring this new resource, visit HPRC’s new web pages. If you have a question, contact us via “Ask the Expert.”

DMAA-containing products in question

HPRC offers a list of products containing DMAA to help you make informed decisions in buying dietary supplements.

Dietary supplement products containing DMAA have been temporarily removed from military stores by the AAFES, but they are still available on the public retail market. HPRC has prepared a list of many of these products to help you watch for them if you are considering the purchase of dietary supplements. DMAA is found most commonly in products sold for bodybuilding or weight loss, but it can also be found in other performance-enhancing products, as well as in recreational party pills. The list also includes other names for DMAA that may be found on product labels. To download the list, go to the Dietary Supplements Resources page under the “Resources” tab, or just click on this link to directly access “Dietary Supplement Products Containing DMAA.”

Department of Defense removes DMAA-containing dietary supplements from exchanges

HPRC Fitness Arena: Dietary Supplements
DMAA-containing dietary supplements at military exchanges have been temporarily removed from shelves.

Due to concerns about possible serious adverse health effects, the Department of Defense (DoD) has put a medical hold on the sale of weight-loss and bodybuilding products containing 1,3-dimethylamylamine (DMAA), also referred to as methylhexanamine, Geranamine, and geranium oil, extract, or stems and leaves, from military exchanges.

An extensive investigation will take place to determine the safety of DMAA in dietary supplement products, as well as an educational campaign to assist Warfighters and their families in making informed choices.

For more information, please see the Question and Answers fact sheet by the Directorate of Strategic Communications, Office of the Surgeon General.

More on Jack3d and OxyElite Pro

Jack3d and OxyElite Pro contain the ingredient DMAA, but recent findings do not support claims that it is a “natural” derivative from the geranium plant. It’s another story of “buyer beware.”

HPRC recently wrote about “The Lure of Jack3d” and answered a “Question from the Field” about OxyElite Pro. Jack3d is marketed as a pre-workout supplement and OxyElite Pro is marketed as a fat-burner product. Both contain the ingredient 1,3-dimethylamylamine (DMAA). Since we last wrote about both products, there have been new reports about DMAA.

Makers of Jack3d and OxyElite Pro claim that DMAA is a “natural constituent” of the geranium plant. DMAA was originally patented as a drug in the U.S. by Lilly in the 1940s. Since then, it has been identified on many product labels (especially on sport, energy, and weight-loss products) as being derived from geranium oil, stem, or extract, but review of the scientific literature has not substantiated this claim. To date, there is no credible scientific data that establishes the presence of methylhexanamine in geranium. Recently, the American Herbal Products Association announced that products containing DMAA (which can also be seen on labels as 1,3-dimethlypentlyamine, methylhexaneamine, or MHA, in addition to 1,3-dimethylamylamine) should be labeled as such and not as geranium oil or any part of the geranium plant. Health Canada has clarified that DMAA is a drug and must go through appropriate drug approval processes before it is used in any product. The United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) has long warned athletes about dietary supplements and more recently about the inclusion of methylhexaneamine in products under the guise of “geranium”; USADA has recently issued an advisory to athletes. There are questions about whether DMAA may be legally included in dietary supplements, since there is no credible evidence that it is present in geranium and it has not gone through the New Dietary Ingredient notification process with the Food and Drug Administration. Therefore, caution is advised when considering whether to use a product that contains this ingredient. Please be aware that such products may be sold in large retail nutrition outlets and on the Internet.

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USADA Athletic Advisory: Methylhexaneamine and dietary supplements

HPRC Fitness Arena: Dietary Supplements, Nutrition
Athletes are advised to avoid consuming supplements that contain the prohibited stimulant methylhexaneamine, also known as DMAA.

The United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) has issued an Athlete Advisory regarding methylhexaneamine, a prohibited stimulant. After reports that many athletes have tested positive for this stimulant, USADA is advising athletes to be cautious about taking supplements with methylhexaneamine, also referred to on labels as 1,3-dimethylamylamine (DMAA), dimethylpentylamine (DMP 4-methylhexan-2-amine), Geranamine, and geranium oil, extract, or stems and leaves. For more information, read the USADA Athletic Advisory.

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