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Alerts

RegenESlim Appetite Control Capsules voluntarily recalled due to the presence of DMAA.

FDA warns consumers about caffeine powder. 

FDA advises consumers to stop using any supplement products labeled as OxyElite Pro or VERSA-1. Please see the following advisories: FDA -10/08/13, FDA - 10/11/13 and CDC - 10/08/13.

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Announcements

New article on reporting side effects of supplements
Just published in The New England Journal of Medicine: A recent article brings up dietary supplement issues you need to be aware of and discusses how dietary supplement side effects could be monitored better. A PDF of the April 3rd article is available free online.

3rd International Congress on Soldiers’ Physical Performance
August 18-21, 2014
The ICSPP delivers innovative scientific programming on soldiers’ physical performance with experts from around the world.

DMAA list updated for April 2014

Fueling Performance Photo Campaign
Share photos of how you fuel your performance and be featured on our Facebook page!

Dietary supplement module
Earn continuing education credits (if eligible) for this two-hour online module.

Operation LiveWell

Performance Triad

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Filed under: Detoxification

Cleansing programs: Friend or foe?

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
Are internal cleansing programs safe and effective for the Warfighter? Learn the facts.

A hot trend in nutrition and dieting for some Warfighters is internal cleansing (or “cleansing” for short). Typical cleansing programs promise renewed energy, weight loss, and a fresh start—appealing offers following the rigors of a deployment, a recent change of duty station, or just life in general. Variants of cleansing programs may include “detox” (short for detoxification) diets, dietary supplement products, enemas, or some combination of these.

Although some detox diets emphasize eating lots of fruits and vegetables and drinking plenty of water, many detox diets lack certain vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients, and are dangerously low in calories. It might be difficult for a Warfighter to obtain adequate calories for optimal performance while following a typical detox diet.

Detox supplement products often contain herbs and other plant-based chemicals that have a laxative effect. Long-term use of laxative products can cause changes in the structure of your large intestine (colon) that might have serious health effects. Laxatives can cause dehydration, which impairs performance. In addition, according to the Food and Drug Administration there are concerns about dietary supplement products containing hidden active ingredients that can result in harmful effects.

Detox enemas, often marketed as “colon cleanse” products, cause the contents of the colon to be quickly expelled. Detox enemas contain a variety of substances, some of which can cause allergic reactions or electrolyte imbalances. Since many detox enemas are self-administered, there’s also the risk of tearing the inside of your rectum during the procedure, which can cause septicemia—a type of bacterial infection in the blood.

The guiding principle behind cleanse programs is that environmental and dietary toxins supposedly build up in your body, and you need to get rid of them to be healthy. However, there really isn’t any scientific evidence backing up these claims. Your body is designed to detox itself by getting rid of wastes through urine, feces, and sweat. The best way to take advantage of these built-in detox systems is to drink plenty of water (to produce more urine), get plenty of fiber from fruits, vegetables, and whole grains (to help pass feces), and exercise (to produce sweat)—a proven program to help you perform better and live a healthy life.

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Confused about supplements?

HPRC Fitness Arena:
Wandering down the aisle of a store looking for a dietary supplement can be overwhelming and intimidating. The Natural Medicines Database can help.

Wandering down the aisle of a store looking for a dietary supplement can be overwhelming and intimidating. There are so many to choose from, and we often have to make our choices based on advertising claims and rely on the manufacturers for ingredient information. Does the supplement actually have the ingredients claimed on the label? Will it have the reported effect on our health?

The Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database is the “scientific gold standard” for evidence-based information on dietary supplements and natural medicines, including drug interactions, effectiveness, safety and use, and more. HPRC has partnered with Natural Medicines Database to allow healthcare providers, Warfighters, and military families to search this comprehensive database in order to make informed decisions about dietary supplement use. The Natural Medicines Database also has “Natural MedWATCH,” which allows users to report an adverse event associated with the use of dietary supplements or natural medicines so that they can then forward the report on to the appropriate regulatory agency.

By going to the HPRC homepage, users can access any of the three database choices provided: Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database for Health Professionals, Consumers, or Natural MedWATCH. After choosing one of the sites, first-time users should sign up for an account, which is done with an active DoD email address. Once inside this vast database, a user can search for an individual natural medicine ingredient of interest or a brand name product.

The professional version of the database includes:

  • Evidence-based monographs available for individual natural ingredients.
  • Scientific names of ingredients
  • Information on safety, effectiveness, mechanism of action, adverse reactions, interactions, and dosage/administration (which are not necessarily recommended or safe doses) of ingredients
  • Patient handouts
  • Brand-name product searches by ingredient
  • “Natural Product Effectiveness Checker” for medical conditions
  • “Natural Product Drug Interaction Checker” for a list of drugs/natural products interactions
  • Comprehensive information on brand-name products, including ingredient lists and summary reports on effectiveness, interactions, and adverse effects.
  • Up-to-date information for over 60,000 brand name products

The consumer version, for military families and Warfighters, contains the same research-based information on herbal remedies, dietary supplements and other natural products, but in an easier-to-understand version. An important point consumers should be aware of is that it may be necessary to research each individual ingredient in a product before making a decision to use it for health benefits.

So, if you want to find credible, evidence-based information on dietary supplements and/or natural products, search the Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database. Evaluating natural health products can be daunting and there is no other comprehensive, reliable site like it to guide you in making your decision.

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