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Alerts

FDA advises consumers to stop using any supplement products labeled as OxyElite Pro or VERSA-1. Please see the following advisories: FDA -10/08/13, FDA - 10/11/13 and CDC - 10/08/13.

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Announcements

New article on reporting side effects of supplements
Just published in The New England Journal of Medicine: A recent article brings up dietary supplement issues you need to be aware of and discusses how dietary supplement side effects could be monitored better. A PDF of the April 3rd article is available free online.

3rd International Congress on Soldiers’ Physical Performance
August 18-21, 2014
The ICSPP delivers innovative scientific programming on soldiers’ physical performance with experts from around the world.

DMAA list updated for April 2014

Fueling Performance Photo Campaign
Share photos of how you fuel your performance and be featured on our Facebook page!

Dietary supplement module
Earn continuing education credits (if eligible) for this two-hour online module.

Operation LiveWell

Performance Triad

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Filed under: Diet

Performance Quotes: Feed your performance

HPRC Fitness Arena: Total Force Fitness
“Our food should be our medicine and our medicine should be our food.” - Hippocrates

If you are eating good-quality foods in a well-balanced diet, then supplements aren’t necessary to achieve optimal performance. However, if you think you need to take supplements, make sure that you are well informed about the effectiveness and safety of the supplements you are taking or considering adding to your diet. Visit HPRC’s Dietary Supplements Classification System and the Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database to learn more about performance supplements. In addition, check out our introduction to Operation Supplement Safety (OPSS), the new Department of Defense educational campaign about to be launched to help determine the relative safety of a dietary supplement product.

Know your cholesterol numbers

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
Do you know what your HDL and LDL numbers are?

Good cholesterol, or high-density lipoprotein (HDL), helps prevent fat and cholesterol from clogging your arteries. A higher HDL number (> 60 mg/dl of blood) is better. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is considered bad cholesterol. It carries cholesterol to your arteries and can cause them to become blocked. A lower LDL number (< 100 mg/dl) is better. High-LDL or low-HDL cholesterol levels are major risk factors for heart disease and stroke. Visit this American Hearth Association web page for more information.

DMAA list updates

HPRC has again updated its list of DMAA containing products. The latest news includes New Zealand’s ban on DMAA-containing products.

The latest news on DMAA includes the New Zealand government’s ban just placed on DMAA-containing products. DMAA has already been declared a drug in Canada and is banned by the World Anti-Doping Agency, the United States Anti-doping Agency (USADA), collegiate sports teams, and most professional sports teams.

HPRC has again updated its list of DMAA-containing dietary supplements, including a number of additions as well as some products that have been discontinued or reformulated. The additions mostly represent lesser-known products that have been around a while, but surprisingly there are a couple new products too. And we have added two new “aliases” to the list of other names for DMAA. To download the list, click on this link to “Dietary Supplement Products Containing DMAA.

The lowdown on stress fractures—and how to prevent them

Stress fractures are chronic injuries that occur most often in the lower extremities. Prevention is key and can be helped through adequate attention to nutrition, training surfaces, and footwear, as well as gradual progression in training.

The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons defines a stress fracture as a tiny crack in a bone that occurs when fatigued muscles lose their ability to absorb shock and then transfer stresses to the bone. Most stress fractures occur in the lower extremities, and more than half occur in the lower leg and foot.

A stress fracture is an overuse—sometimes referred to as chronic—injury, which means that it develops over a long period of time—from weeks to months. According to a 2011 systematic review published in Military Medicine, stress fracture incidence is high among U.S. military recruits, ranging anywhere from 3% for men to 9.2% for women.

Since it can take several weeks or months for a stress fracture to heal, the best approach is to avoid getting one. Here are some tips for prevention:

  1. Apply the progression principle of training—gradually increase your training intensity. Slowly incorporate higher-stress activities such as jumping and interval training into your workout. Setting incremental goals can be helpful in carrying out your training routine in a gradual way. And check out HPRC’s Physical Fitness Resources for more information on training and ways to avoid injury.
  2. Check your footwear and make sure it matches your training. Replace footwear that is old or worn.
  3. Pay attention to the surface where you train, since some are easier on the bones and joints of the lower extremities. For example, it is better to jog on softer surfaces such as rubber track or grass rather than on concrete. Also, it’s better to begin training on a flat surface and then progress to hills.
  4. Monitor your diet, specifically calcium and vitamin D intake, and read the National Institute of Health’s Dietary Supplement Fact Sheet on calcium. To learn more about nutrition take a look at HPRC’s Nutrition Resources.

It is important to recognize a stress fracture and seek medical advice early, as discussed in Clinics in Sports Medicine. The Mayo Clinic provides information on the symptoms of a stress fracture.

More for National Nutrition Month

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics offers special resources for National Nutrition Month, including healthy recipes.

National Nutrition Month is still going strong, bringing lots of healthy eating information to the attention of Americans. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics is weighing in with their “Get Your Plate in Shape” campaign, which focuses on getting the right nutrition without too many calories. Their Eat Right website page offers snack ideas, recipes, weight management tips, and exercise nutrition advice.

March is National Nutrition Month

The FDA is using National Nutrition Month to remind Americans they can use the Nutrition Facts labels on food and drinks to make healthier choices.

The goal of National Nutrition Month is to remind Americans to eat healthy and choose foods with good nutrition. The FDA’s theme for 2012 is “Remember to Use the Nutrition Facts Label.” One tool you can use to help make good food choices is the Nutrition Facts label that appears on all packaged foods and beverages. To learn how to read labels, visit the FDA’s web page “Nutrition Facts Label Programs and Materials.”

Dietary supplements: What’s in them for you?

HPRC’s new Dietary Supplement Classification System offers information to help you decide whether a dietary supplement can help you reach your performance goals or whether it may have side effects you want to avoid.

What do you put in your body to boost your performance, increase your energy, shed pounds, build muscle, or otherwise supplement your diet? What’s in that drink, pill, or powder? What will it do for you? What will it do to you? Is it worth the risk?

More and more Warfighters are taking dietary supplements, most without being fully informed that some of the ingredients could have harmful side effects. HPRC has just unveiled its Dietary Supplement Classification System to provide this kind of information and help you make informed decisions about a particular supplement. To start exploring this new resource, visit HPRC’s new web pages. If you have a question, contact us via “Ask the Expert.”

Fueling the machine

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
Food is essential to our survival and healthy eating has a big impact on your physical performance.

Warfighters must be in excellent physical condition to endure a variety of physical tasks for extended periods. Healthy eating will greatly affect your physical performance. For good health and performance, eat the energy-providing nutrients (known as macronutrients)—carbohydrates, proteins, and fats. These foods supply fuel and are involved in many functions in your body. For detailed information on each of the macronutrients, see the Warfighter Nutrition Guide.

Healthy snacking can help your performance and alertness

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
Healthy snacking can sustain performance at home or in the field.

Whether you are at home or on operations, healthy snacking can sustain your mind and body so your performance is maximized. Keep high-nutrient foods on hand at home, while at work, or during night operations. For specific suggestions and tips on healthy snacking, see the Warfighter Nutrition Guide.

Could you be at risk of an eating disorder?

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
Learn about the risk factors that could lead to an eating disorder, including causes, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment.

Eating disorders affect more women than men, and usually there is no single cause. Risks of developing an eating disorder can stem from genetics; biologic, emotional, and personality disorders, as well as family situations. Warfighters are not immune to these disorders and may even have a higher percentage than the general population. Having an eating disorder can significantly impact your performance. Not getting enough food or not eating healthy, consistent amounts of food means that your body is not being fueled optimally for performance. The University of Maryland Medical Center has put together a report on risk factors, causes, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment for eating disorders as well as links to other helpful resources.

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