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Women and heart disease

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Heart disease is the number-one killer for both men and women. Do you know how to reduce your risk?

Heart disease is the number-one killer for both men and women. A well-balanced diet, along with regular exercise, can reduce the risk of heart disease. New heart disease guidelines were recently issued, with particular focus on illnesses that increase the risk of cardiovascular disease in women. For more information, read the news release and information about the new guidelines, which include information about the American Heart Association’s “Go Red for Women” campaign.

 

 

Consume less salt

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The daily recommended intake has gone down.

The American Heart Association recently reduced the recommended daily intake of sodium, or salt, to 1500 mg or less per day. High salt intake is associated with increased risk of blood pressure, heart attack, stroke, and kidney disease and many Americans are at risk. Read about daily recommendations and the benefits of consuming less salt by clicking here.

Choose a variety of foods for adequate calcium intake

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Your body needs calcium for optimal bone health and a number of other functions essential to daily life.

Your body needs calcium for optimal bone health and a number of other functions essential to daily life. Good food sources include: fat-free or low-fat milk, cheese, and yogurt; leafy greens such as spinach and kale; and broccoli, and pinto and red beans.  Many other foods such as high fiber cereal, soy beverages, and orange juice are fortified with added calcium.  Adding these foods to your diet will improve not only your calcium intake, but many other nutrients as well!

First Lady visit to Fort Jackson will highlight the impact of obesity and decreased physical activity on military recruitment

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First lady Michelle Obama will visit South Carolina this week to highlight the impact of childhood obesity and decreased physical activity on military recruitment.



First Lady Michelle Obama will visit South Carolina on January 27 for the first time since moving into the White House when she comes to Fort Jackson to highlight the impact of childhood obesity and decreased physical activity on military recruitment. Ms. Obama will spend a good chunk of the day at Fort Jackson, the Army’s largest training base, where she will discuss the “Let’s Move” campaign she launched two years ago with the aim of eliminating childhood obesity in a generation.

Click below to access the article.

Michelle Obama to visit Fort Jackson

Bad eating habits: Advice to help service members eat healthier

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Bad eating habits affect both civilians and military members.



Defense Video & Imagery Distribution System (DVIDShub.net) has an article on the obesity epidemic - which is a major problem in the United States according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The article reports that bad eating habits affect both civilians and military members and provides information on how service members can improve their eating habits.

Click below to access the article.

Bad eating habits: Advice to help service members eat healthier

What serving sizes look like

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How to eyeball a serving size for better eating

Do you know what a serving size is for different food groups?  Here are a few helpful tips for standard serving sizes:

A one-cup serving of cereal or other grain is about the size of your fist; one medium fruit is about the size of a baseball; a half-cup serving of ice cream is about half a baseball; three ounces of meat, fish or poultry is the size of a deck of cards.  For more helpful hints on serving sizes click here.

Eat to protect your heart

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Experts from MedicineNet, the American Dietetic Association, and the Cleveland Clinic developed a heart-healthy food pictures slideshow. Besides pictures, the slideshow also includes menu ideas to help you easily use these foods in your daily diet.

Experts from MedicineNet, the American Dietetic Association, and the Cleveland Clinic developed a heart-healthy food pictures slideshow. Besides pictures, the slideshow also includes menu ideas to help you easily use these foods in your daily diet. The foods that protect against heart disease include: salmon, flaxseed, oatmeal, black or kidney beans, almonds, walnuts, red wine, tuna, tofu, brown rice, soy milk, blueberries, carrots, spinach, broccoli, sweet potatoes, red bell peppers, asparagus, oranges, tomatoes, acorn squash, cantaloupe, papaya, dark chocolate, and squash.

Do you know which dairy products to choose?

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Filed under: Nutrition, Diet

Milk and milk products provide calcium which is important for bone health. Choose low-fat or fat-free milk, cheese, and yogurt to reduce your intake of fat and calories. Switching from whole milk to 1% milk will save 50 calories and over 5 grams of fat per serving. Try using low or fat-free yogurts and milk in dips, salad dressings, and cream soups.

Eggs and cholesterol


Eggs are a good source of protein but the yolks are high in cholesterol; egg whites are cholesterol-free. A diet high in cholesterol may contribute to high blood cholesterol levels and increase your risk of heart disease. Experts recommend that you limit your cholesterol intake to less than 300 mg a day if you are a healthy individual and less than 200 mg a day if you have heart condition. Since one egg has about 213 mg of cholesterol, consider limiting other sources of cholesterol on days you eat eggs. The Mayoclinic offers tips to reduce cholesterol intake.

 

 

Include nuts and seeds in your diet


Remember to include nuts and seeds in your diet. Try them as snacks, on salads, or in main dishes. You can even use nuts to replace meat or poultry. For example, add toasted peanuts to a vegetable stir fry instead of meat. Or, add walnuts or pecans to a green salad instead of cheese or meat.

Source: Mypyramid.gov

 

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