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Alerts

RegenESlim Appetite Control Capsules voluntarily recalled due to the presence of DMAA.

FDA warns consumers about caffeine powder. 

FDA advises consumers to stop using any supplement products labeled as OxyElite Pro or VERSA-1. Please see the following advisories: FDA -10/08/13, FDA - 10/11/13 and CDC - 10/08/13.

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Announcements

New article on reporting side effects of supplements
Just published in The New England Journal of Medicine: A recent article brings up dietary supplement issues you need to be aware of and discusses how dietary supplement side effects could be monitored better. A PDF of the April 3rd article is available free online.

3rd International Congress on Soldiers’ Physical Performance
August 18-21, 2014
The ICSPP delivers innovative scientific programming on soldiers’ physical performance with experts from around the world.

DMAA list updated for April 2014

Fueling Performance Photo Campaign
Share photos of how you fuel your performance and be featured on our Facebook page!

Dietary supplement module
Earn continuing education credits (if eligible) for this two-hour online module.

Operation LiveWell

Performance Triad

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Filed under: Exercise

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Save your knees with a few simple tips

HPRC Fitness Arena:
Prevent knee injury with these tips.

Try these tips from the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Disease to prevent knee injury while you exercise:

  • Avoid bending your knees past 90 degree when doing half knee bends or squats.
  • Avoid twisting your knees by keeping your feet as flat as possible during stretching.
  • When jumping, land with your knees bent.

Source: Handout on Health. Sports Injuries. National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Disease.

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When to exercise and when to just stay in bed

HPRC Fitness Arena:
Exercise can help fend off illness, but what if you're already sick?

It's true that exercise can help prevent the common cold by strengthening your immune system, but you should be cautious if you are considering an intense workout when you do fall sick. Some recommendations from the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) are to:

  • Exercise moderately when the cold symptoms are confined to your head,
  • Stay in bed if illness spreads beyond your head - don’t “sweat out” your illness, and
  • Resume your exercise program slowly as you recover.

Check out ACSM’s guide, Clearing the Air on Exercise and the Common Cold for more information.

Exercise smart to prevent injuries

HPRC Fitness Arena:
Some tips to keep you from hurting yourself while exercising

Since injuries can occur in physically active individuals, here are a few tips to help you stay injury free:

  • Warm-up and cool-down after exercise;
  • Use proper form;
  • Spread activity throughout the week, not just the weekend;
  • Wear appropriate safety gear;
  • Increase intensity and time gradually, and
  • Cross train to prevent overuse injuries.

Click here for more information: Handout on Health. Sports Injuries. National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Disease.

Is it time for your sneakers to hit the road?

HPRC Fitness Arena: Physical Fitness
How to know when it's time to get new sneakers.

According to the American Council on Exercise (ACE), your sneakers are ready to be replaced after three to six months of regular use, or approximately 350 to 500 miles of running. Looking at the wear patterns can provide good indicators that your sneakers need to be replaced.

When the time comes to replace your sneakers, ACE has specific suggestions to help you find the perfect, and affordable, pair. They suggest that you buy sport specific shoes, test for stability, try on shoes at the end of the day when feet are their largest, and allow room for socks. Although some sports scientists will advise you to consider your foot type when purchasing sneakers, there is conflicting scientific evidence on this recommendation.

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Exercise to avoid catching a cold or flu

HPRC Fitness Arena:
A study shows that regular exercisers are less likely to fall sick with a cold or flu.

An article published in ScienceDaily reports on a study which shows that regular exercisers are less likely to fall sick with a cold or flu. The study participants who exercised more were less likely to report a cold or flu in the fall and winter seasons, and if they did get sick, they had fewer symptoms with shorter duration. Click here for more information on this study.

Train in warm weather to improve performance anytime

HPRC Fitness Arena:
Science Daily reports on a new study published in the Journal of Applied Physiology that indicates training in warm weather not only improves heat acclimation and performance in the heat, but also improves performance in cool conditions.

Science Daily reports on a new study published in the Journal of Applied Physiology which indicates that training in warm weather not only improves heat acclimation and performance in the heat, but also improves performance in cool conditions. Click here for more details about the study.

Count calories one step at a time

HPRC Fitness Arena:

Mypyramid.gov is a useful tool to track your daily food choices and log your physical activity. It also offers personalized eating plans, healthy menu tips, suggestions for making healthy food choices from all food groups, and strategies to stay active.

Jump rope for fitness

HPRC Fitness Arena:
Jumping rope is a good way to maintain fitness, particularly in confined environments such as on board a ship. If the pace is fast, the energy expenditure can be similar to running.

Jumping rope is a good way to maintain fitness, particularly in confined environments such as on board a ship. If the pace is fast, the energy expenditure is similar to running. The Navy Seals Fitness Guide suggests the following ways to add variety into your jump rope routine:

  • Boxer’s Dance: Shift weight from right to left with both feet together.
  • Run: Jump to the right while lifting the right knee, then switch to left side.
  • Jumping Jack: Jump 2 times with feet together then on the third time, do a jumping jack.
  • Knee-toe: Tap right toe on the floor, jump to your left foot while lifting left knee up high, then switch.

How strong are your bones?

HPRC Fitness Arena:
Strength-training for your bones.

We don’t give much thought to our skeletal systems until we do something that results in a broken bone. But bones play a vital role in a person’s general health and fitness. Our bones support us, allow us to move, and protect our vital organs from injury. They also store minerals—such as calcium and phosphorus—that are released into the bloodstream when our systems need them, for example, for muscle contractions.

Bone loss usually occurs gradually over a long period of time. By taking steps now to maintain healthy bones, you could ward off medical conditions such as osteoporosis.

One way to maintain optimal bone health is to eat foods rich in calcium and vitamin D. Without enough vitamin D, the body cannot absorb enough calcium from the foods we eat. This causes calcium to be taken our bones, which prevents the growth of new bone and results in weaker bones.

Good sources of calcium include low-fat dairy products, nuts and seeds, beans, broccoli and other leafy green vegetables, and fortified products such as orange juice that have added calcium. Good sources of vitamin D are egg yolks, fatty fish, beef liver, and milk with vitamin D. We also make vitamin D when our skin is exposed to the sun, although not everyone is able to get enough vitamin D this way.

Another way to keep your bones strong is to engage in physical activity. The best exercises are the strength-building and weight-bearing kinds such as walking, climbing, lifting weights, and dancing.

Other ways to maintain bone health include preventing falls by reducing the risk factors that you can control. Improve your balance and strength through exercise, maintain good vision, and make sure that your home is free of “falling dangers” such as poor lighting and loose rugs. Risk factors such as smoking, alcohol, medications, and body weight are also controllable. Smoking cigarettes, like vitamin D deficiency, can keep your body from using the calcium in your diet. Alcohol and certain medications (glucocorticoids, for example) also can cause your bones to become weak or lose mass. Moreover, being too thin increases one’s risk of developing weak bones that are more likely to break. If necessary, boost your diet with calcium and vitamin D supplements. Also consider talking to your physician about your bone health.

You may have heard again and again how important calcium and vitamin D are. Maybe you’ve even taken some or all of the steps above. But if you haven’t, start now and take action! Eat the right foods and exercise for strong bones.

No weights, no gym… No problem.


Have you ever been tempted to try the exercise equipment advertised on late-night infomercials—the products that promise to enhance various body parts or provide a great workout for a low, low price? Most of it isn’t necessary to get into the shape you want. Some of the most effective workouts can be done at home­­—with only your own body weight. It’s not that equipment is bad—correct use of weights and some machines can be very effective—but it isn’t necessary, nor is it an excuse to prevent you from getting in a good workout when equipment isn’t available.

There are some clear benefits to exercising at home without the use of equipment, including saving time and money that you would spend at a gym. Most importantly, exercising by using your body weight provides you with the ability to exercise anytime and anywhere—you aren’t restricted only to the times when you have access to the piece of equipment or device. Also, there are a variety of ways to go about a home-based program, ranging from workouts on DVD to a workout you create for yourself. Those already familiar with online workouts may know that YouTube has been afire with videos of extraordinarily fit people demonstrating their workouts done with minimal equipment in their homes, backyards, or local parks. Always proceed with caution—these videos are impressive and can be useful, but realize that they come with a risk of serious injury. Before you begin any home workout, consult your physician and/or an exercise professional to determine what is safe, and best for you.

We list some examples below of fitness moves that can be performed at home without equipment. These moves should be performed properly and at the right intensity level for them to be effective and safe. The American Council on Exercise (ACE) provides an Exercise Library that displays the proper form for many exercises.

Core

Crunches (Supine Reverse, Supine Bicycle)

Plank (Front, Side)

Glute Activation Lunges

Bridge

Vertical Toe Touches

Upper Body

Inchworms

Push Ups (Standard, Single Leg Raise)

Downward-Facing Dog

Superman

Bird-Dog

Lower-Body Strength

Lunges (Forward, Side,

Bridge (Standard, Single Leg)

Squats (Single Leg)

Wall Sits

Inverted Flyers

Full Body

Spider Walks

Sprinter Pulls

Mountain Climbers

Squat Jumps (Cycled Split)

Jump and Reach

For a complete workout, visit ACE’s At Home (Without Equipment) Workout.

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