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Try calisthenics to improve strength

Calisthenics may help improve your strength.

Calisthenics have long been a basic component of Warfighter training to increase strength. They require minimal equipment and space and can be done virtually anywhere. Common calisthenic exercises include push-ups, pull-ups, sit-ups, dips, and squats. They help develop and maintain muscle strength, endurance, and power as well as flexibility. There are many ways to customize a calisthenic routine to achieve a specific fitness goal. For example, performing a low number of repetitions with added resistance will effectively increase muscle strength. Training with a buddy is a great way to provide resistance. Muscle endurance, on the other hand, requires a routine with a lot of repetitions. It’s recommended to include two calisthenic sessions each week on nonconsecutive days, along with other forms of physical training (e.g., plyometrics, strength training, or aerobic training). A 30-minute calisthenic session should consist of one to three exercises that involve multiple muscle groups.

For more detailed information on calisthenics, go to Chapter 8 of The Navy SEAL Physical Fitness Guide.

Get FITT to optimize muscle strength

Optimize your muscle strength and endurance by following the FITT principle.

Muscle strength is an essential component for successful Warfighter performance. Developing optimal muscle strength and endurance maximizes job performance and reduces risk of injury. The FITT principle can help you achieve this goal. FITT refers to “frequency, intensity, time (or duration), and type” of activity.

  • Frequency is the number of sessions in a week that an individual trains. At least two days per week of strength training is recommended.
  • Intensity, considered the most important aspect of strength and endurance conditioning, is defined by the amount of weight used per repetition. For muscle endurance, training should involve 20-60 repetitions of 30% to 50% of one repetition max (1RM; the maximum amount of weight one can lift for one repetition) per set. For muscle strength, training should involve 1-12 repetitions of 65% to 90% of 1RM per set.
  • Time of sessions should range from 30 to 60 minutes.
  • Type of exercise should vary in strength and conditioning routines to prevent boredom and improve gains. A combination of free weights and machines is recommended.

For more detailed information on strength training, read Chapter 6, Strength Training, of The Navy SEAL Physical Fitness Guide.

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Exercise 101

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Don’t forget to exercise your heart. As with all other fitness requirements, Warfighters need extra cardio fitness for optimal performance.

The American College of Sports Medicine and the American Heart Association recommend doing moderate-intensity cardiovascular exercise for 30 minutes a day, five days a week (for details of these guidelines, click here). However, elite athletes and tactical Warfighters need to train more to achieve higher levels of fitness—see the Navy Seal Fitness Guide and the Building the Soldier Athlete Manual for more information.

Monitor your physical performance using your heart rate

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Your heart is the key to effective training. Learn how to monitor it during exercise to achieve the optimum results from your training program.

Monitor your heart rate to ensure that you are training in the appropriate range for your performance needs. This simple practice will help you track the way your body responds to training to effectively optimize your physical performance. The American Council on Exercise (ACE) has information on how to monitor your exercise intensity using your heart rate, as well as an online tool for calculating your target heart rate. A similar online calculator is available from the Army’s Hooah 4 Health website.

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Get fit on the job: Part II

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More tips for working out at work.

Fitness is so important to your mental and physical health. Consider scheduling exercise into your work day; put it on your calendar! Keep packable tools like elastic tubing and bands at your desk. You can easily strengthen your chest, upper back, shoulders, arms, and legs in just a few minutes, two or three times a week. All without leaving your office! For ideas, click here: ACE GETFIT: Time saving tips for on-the-job fitness

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Get fit on the job: Part I

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If you can't find time to exercise, try getting fit at work.

Can’t find time to fit exercise in during your day? Then get fit at work! Consider biking or walking to work, if practical. If not, walk around your workplace before or after work, or during work breaks, for 20-30 minutes. Lunchtime walks with a friend are fun and a stress reliever. Use the stairs rather than elevator. Check out this link for more terrific ideas: ACE GETFIT: Time saving tips for on-the-job fitness

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Save your knees with a few simple tips

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Prevent knee injury with these tips.

Try these tips from the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Disease to prevent knee injury while you exercise:

  • Avoid bending your knees past 90 degree when doing half knee bends or squats.
  • Avoid twisting your knees by keeping your feet as flat as possible during stretching.
  • When jumping, land with your knees bent.

Source: Handout on Health. Sports Injuries. National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Disease.

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When to exercise and when to just stay in bed

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Exercise can help fend off illness, but what if you're already sick?

It's true that exercise can help prevent the common cold by strengthening your immune system, but you should be cautious if you are considering an intense workout when you do fall sick. Some recommendations from the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) are to:

  • Exercise moderately when the cold symptoms are confined to your head,
  • Stay in bed if illness spreads beyond your head - don’t “sweat out” your illness, and
  • Resume your exercise program slowly as you recover.

Check out ACSM’s guide, Clearing the Air on Exercise and the Common Cold for more information.

Exercise smart to prevent injuries

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Some tips to keep you from hurting yourself while exercising

Since injuries can occur in physically active individuals, here are a few tips to help you stay injury free:

  • Warm-up and cool-down after exercise;
  • Use proper form;
  • Spread activity throughout the week, not just the weekend;
  • Wear appropriate safety gear;
  • Increase intensity and time gradually, and
  • Cross train to prevent overuse injuries.

Click here for more information: Handout on Health. Sports Injuries. National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Disease.

Is it time for your sneakers to hit the road?

HPRC Fitness Arena: Physical Fitness
How to know when it's time to get new sneakers.

According to the American Council on Exercise (ACE), your sneakers are ready to be replaced after three to six months of regular use, or approximately 350 to 500 miles of running. Looking at the wear patterns can provide good indicators that your sneakers need to be replaced.

When the time comes to replace your sneakers, ACE has specific suggestions to help you find the perfect, and affordable, pair. They suggest that you buy sport specific shoes, test for stability, try on shoes at the end of the day when feet are their largest, and allow room for socks. Although some sports scientists will advise you to consider your foot type when purchasing sneakers, there is conflicting scientific evidence on this recommendation.

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