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Filed under: Families

White House initiatives to support military families

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The White House has announced new initiatives to support military families in four key areas: overall well-being, education and development of military children, career advancement opportunities for military spouses, and improved childcare.

Recently, the White House announced new initiatives to support military families in four key areas: overall well-being, education and development of military children, career advancement opportunities for military spouses, and improved availability of quality childcare. Multiple agencies have partnered to support these efforts with the following goals:

  • Focus on suicide trends to offer targeted preventive training and counseling to meet the mental health needs of military families;
  • Offer child care resources;
  • Combat homelessness;
  • Expand communication across rural communities;
  • Expand career opportunities for military spouses;
  • Expand access to financial aid and needs of military students; and
  • Expand facilities to help military families recover, integrate, and support their youth during and after deployment cycles.

    Some tips for redeployment and reuniting

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    When reuniting with your family, the “Soldier and Family Guide to Redeploying” offers tips for maintaining successful family relationships.

     

    When reuniting with your family, the “Soldier and Family Guide to Redeploying” offers tips for maintaining successful family relationships. A few of their suggestions:

    For Warfighters:

    • Take time to re-establish communication with each of your loved ones.
    • Use romantic communication to help transition into love relations easier.
    • Reinforce the good things your family has done.

    For spouses:

    • Move slowly in making adjustments.
    • Discuss division of the family chores.
    • Spend time alone with your spouse.

    For parents:

    • Focus on successes and limit criticisms.
    • Expect some changes in your child(ren).
    • Spend relaxed time with your child.

    Communication tips for parents

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    The American Psychological Association offers communication tips for parents:

    • Make yourself available to your children to talk, listen or do things together.
    • Let your children know you are listening.
    • Express your opinion in a way that your child can hear your message.
    • Remember that children often learn how to deal with emotions, solve problems, and work through stressful situations from their parents.

    Making step-families work well

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    If you have children from a previous relationship and are building a new one, here are some tips to reduce conflict.

    If you have children from a previous relationship and are building a new one, consider discussing these issues to reduce conflict:

    • Decide together where you should live and how you will manage your money.
    • Close the door on your last relationship; resolve feelings and issues from your past relationship.
    • Determine step parenting roles and responsibilities.
    • Establish rules and boundaries for the blended family.

    The American Psychological Association suggests that you make each other a priority by having regular dates and taking trips without the children.

    Healthy relationship conflict.

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    In all relationships, conflict management is often a key ingredient for success.

    In all relationships, conflict management is often a key ingredient for success. However, the old belief that the best relationships are those without conflict is being replaced with the new understanding that conflict is normal in intimate relationships. The happiest couples, come to find out, are those who manage conflict without being destructive to each other.

    Interestingly, research of couples problems over time shows that 31 percent of the problems couples deal with are solvable, and 69 percent are perpetual problems - so being able to manage differences over time is key to marital happiness!

    Dr. John Gottman, having studied couples for over 20 years, found that there are key ingredients for relationship happiness:

    • Having a strong friendship with your spouse.
    • Being able to manage conflict in the relationship (and knowing which problems are solvable).
    • Avoiding destructive behavior like criticism, contempt, defensiveness or ignoring your spouse.
    • Building dreams and shared meaning with each other.

    For military couples in particular, the ability to problem-solve and manage conflict is key to relationship happiness. Fortunately, problem-solving and conflict management are essential ingredients for Warfighter success. Through pre-deployment training, deployment, and reset, Warfighters within each branch learn key strategies for how to manage their emotions, identify problems, develop friendships, share memories together and map strategies for optimal outcomes - all of which are skills that can help foster great family relationships.

    However, while deployed, each partner can change in ways that their spouse might not be aware of (both in theater and at home). That’s why making the effort to get to know each other again (even if you've been together for 50 years) is an important part of relationship happiness over time.

    Take some time to ask your partner questions like:

    • What attracted you to me when we first met?
    • Who are your best friends at this point?
    • What would you like to see happen for us in the next five years?
    • What about yourself are you most proud of?

    Questions like these can help foster friendship and positive feelings between you, and keep building dreams for a happy relationship and future together.

    Source: These strategies were discussed at the recent American Association of Marriage and Family Therapists conference in September. Specific ideas from Dr. John Gottman's keynote speech, as well as Dr. Robert O'Brien's workshop on "Research-based Conflict Management After Combat Trauma," were used.

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    Key elements to make remarriage work

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    The American Psychological Association offers strategies to make blended families work.

    The American Psychological Association offers strategies to make blended families work:

    • Have your own identity separate from your spouse and children.
    • Maintain some autonomy in relationships while building togetherness through intimacy and identity.
    • Maintain time for a rich sexual relationship that is safe from work and family intrusions.
    • Be flexible in dealing with issues - life is unpredictable.
    • Use humor to keep perspective.
    • Remember how you felt falling in love and keep those images and feelings alive.

    See the American Psychological Association site for more information.

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    Eat at the table with your family

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    There are many reasons to sit down for a meal with your family.

    Eating with your family around the table is an effective way to bond, communicate, and even eat healthier! So, turn off the television and put all cell phones away during dinner time to improve family dynamics and health.

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    Deal with emotional cycles of deployment

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    Learning about the emotional stages of deployment can help couples cope.

    Hooah 4 Health describes the "7 Emotional Cycles of Deployment" for couples - that both the deployed partner and one at home experience. At first, there is anticipation of departure, then detachment and withdrawal. This can lead to feelings of emotional disorganization. Over time, each partner copes with the deployment so that recovery and stabilization occur. Then, anticipation of  the partner's return can start the countdown to deployment’s end. Once back home, partners adjust and renegotiate their roles and can be completely reintegrated and stabilized within a few months. These stages are discussed in detail at the Hooah4Health website.

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    Kids need their nighttime sleep

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    A good night's sleep helps your child stay healthy.

    Recent research published in the Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine journal found that too little nighttime sleep in young children may be a risk factor for obesity. Napping did not appear to be a substitute; experts recommend letting your children get enough sleep at night. You may be reducing their risk for obesity later in life!

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    Balance supporting others and taking care of yourself

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    Finding a balance between taking care of others and taking care of yourself is important.

    Living in high-stress environments while deployed often affects life when Warfighters return home. Families become an important source of reintegration support. However, finding the balance between taking care of others and taking care of yourself is important. The Real Warriors program suggests that time should be set aside for each individual to reset – which could include hanging out with friends and family outside the home, relaxing with a book, through an activity like yoga, or helping out in the community.

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