You are here: Home / HPRC Blog

Filed under: Flight

Tips for G-TIP

HPRC Fitness Arena: Environment, Total Force Fitness
Flying under G-forces? Here are tips you can use to improve your G-tolerance during flight.

Training for flight in dynamic and high-acceleration aircraft requires both good cardiovascular health and anaerobic capabilities; part of well-rounded fitness! Have you heard the myth that all fighter pilots are short, stocky, and need high blood pressure? Not true, you too can develop good G-tolerance! Regular cardiovascular conditioning paired with strength-training programs will properly prepare you for flight under Gs. A strong lower body helps push blood upwards where you need it, in your heart and brain. Being aerobically fit gives you the endurance to keep pushing and not fatigue as quickly while doing the Anti-G Straining Maneuver (AGSM). AGSM is a two-component maneuver pilots perform under g-loads that involves breathing and muscle contractions to increase your blood pressure and maintain blood flow to your brain. Read more here

Aviation and hypoxia

HPRC Fitness Arena: Environment, Total Force Fitness
Filed under: Aviation, Flight, Hypoxia
Hypoxia in aviation is a real threat. Learn the signs and symptoms to recognize it.

Hypoxia, or insufficient oxygen supply to the body, is a stress factor associated with high altitude in aviation. It’s caused by low oxygen levels and decreases in partial pressure. Flight above 10,000 feet is dangerous and restricted without supplemental oxygen, and even the best oxygen and pressurization systems fail sometimes. Above 10,000 feet, an aviator’s “Time of Useful Consciousness” (TUC) begins; this means that you’re going to start having problems focusing, reacting, and making decisions. At 15,000 feet your TUC is around 30 minutes, at which point you’re more likely to be unconscious than not. At 22,000 feet it’s only 5–10 minutes, and by 28,000 feet it can be as fast as 3 minutes! Look out for these signs (what you can see in somebody else) and symptoms (what you can notice in your own body):

  • Cyanosis (bluing of the fingertips or lips)
  • Headache
  • Decreased reaction time
  • Impaired judgment
  • Unexplained happiness/euphoria
  • Visual impairment
  • Drowsiness
  • Lightheaded or dizzy sensation
  • Tingling in fingers and toes
  • Numbness

If you notice any of these signs or symptoms, remember to find the emergency oxygen, use it, and land safely!

Neck pain takes flight

HPRC Fitness Arena: Environment, Total Force Fitness
Neck pain, especially for pilots, can be an occupational problem in the military. Addressing early symptoms of neck pain and certain exercises may help prevent chronic neck pain.

Neck pain in military pilots, particularly helicopter and fighter jet pilots, is a major concern. Conditions inherent in flying helicopters and jets put these pilots (and crew) at a greater risk for developing neck pain due to misaligned postures, the use of additional equipment on their helmets, and exposure to high G-forces. Effectiveness and readiness are compromised if a pilot is can’t fly because of pain. Pilots sometimes forego medical treatment for fear of being grounded or losing their flight status and, as a result, pain is left untreated.

Exercise programs specifically for strengthening the neck area can be helpful in preventing pain. “G-warmup” maneuvers can also be beneficial to prepare a fighter pilot for high G-forces. Military researchers are looking at improving and updating the ergonomics of aircraft seats and cockpits, as well as helmet fit. In the meantime, see your doctor if your neck pain doesn’t improve with rest and basic at-home treatments. And for more information, read HPRC’s InfoReveal.

RSS Feed