You are here: Home / HPRC Blog

Filed under: Food

Summertime food safety

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
Filed under: Food, Safety, Summer
Don’t let germs spoil your summer get-togethers. Try these tips to help keep your outdoor meals safe.

Picnics and barbecues are just around the corner, so be mindful of food safety as you soak up the summer sun and fun. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates one in 6 Americans get sick from foodborne illnesses, including those associated with poorly cooked or stored foods in hot environments. Still, there are ways to keep your favorite foods safe—and your friends and loved ones healthy—this summer.

  • Keep it clean. Wash your hands with warm water and soap for at least 20 seconds before and after handling uncooked eggs or raw meat, poultry, and seafood (and their juices). To prevent cross-contamination, wash utensils and cutting boards with hot, soapy water after food prep too. Tip: Fill a spray bottle with 1 Tbsp chlorine bleach and water, and use it to sanitize your countertops and other food-prep surfaces.
  • Cool it. Thaw frozen foods in the refrigerator, not on the countertop. Safely marinate your meats, poultry, and seafood in the refrigerator until it’s time to cook. Don’t reuse marinade, and don’t serve it with cooked foods.
  • Cook foods thoroughly. Use a food thermometer to check for doneness. Make sure cooked foods have reached a safe internal temperature:
    • Fresh beef, pork, veal, and lamb (steaks, roasts, and chops)—145°F
    • Fresh fish—145°F
    • Ground beef, pork, veal, and lamb (burgers and sausages)—160°F
    • All poultry and pre-cooked meats (such as hot dogs)—165°F
  • Refrigerate your leftovers. Chill your foods to stop the growth of bacteria that can cause foodborne illnesses. Refrigerate items within 2 hours of cooking or 1 hour if the outside temperature is at or above 90°F. Tip: If you’re outside, keep things chilled at 40°F or less in a cooler, or place them directly on ice.

To boost your “BBQ IQ,” visit the CDC webpage.

Posted 22 May 2017

How to equip your kitchen for cooking

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
Learn what you need to equip your kitchen for everyday cooking.

By cooking and eating at home, you’ll save money and prepare healthier meals, but it means you need the right tools. You can pick up kitchen basics from yard sales or thrift stores, family donations, or even when friends or neighbors downsize.

You can purchase all the kitchen basics for roughly $200–300, but compare that to the amount you might spend each year on eating out. Your pieces don’t need to be lavish or color-coordinated, only functional. Remember: Each cook and kitchen are different, so make your choices based on your habits, needs, and space. Read more...

Food: Waste not, want not

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
Filed under: Food, Food waste, Recipes
Find out how to stretch your food budget by making use of foods you might otherwise toss out.

From the uneaten piece of toast in the morning to the leftover veggies thrown out after dinner, food waste can quickly add up. Produce often wilts and softens, and bread products dry out—the natural process of aging—before you get around to eating them. The good news is that many of these foods can be reclaimed. Keep reading for recipes and ideas that can help you use your food resources more efficiently and keep more money in your wallet! Read more...

“Smart snacking” for adults

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
Filed under: Diet, Food, Nutrition
Make sure the next snack attack doesn’t ambush your healthy eating plans. Learn more.

Be prepared so you can make smart choices the next time a snack attack hits. Most people have a “snack drawer”—whether it’s in their office desk, gym locker, backpack, or car. Snacking can be an important part of your meal plan, preventing late-afternoon vending machine runs or overeating at mealtime. Snacks also can provide crucial nutrients before workouts or missions.

A healthy snack provides 100–300 calories, depending on your weight and activity level. Try to stock your snack drawer with a variety of nutrient-rich snacks.

  • Choose lean proteins. Select water-packed tuna in single-serve pouches or nut butters. Or choose walnuts, almonds, or pistachios. If you have an office fridge, stock it with boiled eggs (up to one week) or single-serving cups of hummus, cottage cheese, or Greek yogurt.
  • Pick healthy carbs. Options include instant oatmeal or grits, whole-grain crackers, air-popped popcorn, and dried fruit.
  • Enjoy fresh fruits and veggies. Stock up on cut-up celery or cucumbers, baby carrots, and apples.
  • Stay hydrated. Drink water (flavored with slices of lemon or cucumber), herbal tea, milk, soy milk, or almond milk. Or eat juicy fruits such as watermelon, oranges, and kiwis.

Follow the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) recommendations on consuming foods and drinks too. And be mindful of portion sizes. Make sure to visit the MedlinePlus page to learn more about healthy snacking.

Help reduce food waste

Filed under: Food, Food waste
Roughly 40% of food in the U.S. goes uneaten. Learn how to cut down on food loss and waste.

Food waste is a massive problem in the U.S. Billions of dollars’ worth is wasted each year—about 20 pounds of food per person each month. But there are strategies you can use to help save valuable food resources. Food waste happens along the food chain: from the farm, during transport to grocery stores and commissaries, at retail stores and food service operations, and in your home.

Military communities are working to address food waste by ordering only what’s needed, carefully planning meals, and avoiding waste through reduction and composting. In addition, many commissaries have food donation programs for items that can’t be sold but are still safe to eat. Try to do your share at home too. Read more...

Eating abroad

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
Filed under: Food, Food safety, Travel
Learn how to practice food safety and avoid illness—whether you’re preparing for an overseas deployment, PCS move, humanitarian aid mission, or vacation.

Eating in an unfamiliar culture can be adventurous but sometimes daunting, especially if you’re unprepared. You’ll find foods that are surprisingly familiar, such as sauces, soups, and pastas. However, the spices might be different. You’ll also find foods that are quite different from your usual fare. Keep familiar favorites in your meal plan while you enjoy the variety of special foods each culture has to offer.

You might have concerns about food and beverage safety in some locations, so heed the training you receive for specific areas. To maintain operational readiness and prevent gastrointestinal distress, pay close attention to what you eat and drink. You’re at risk of foodborne illnesses if you consume food or drinks containing certain bacteria, parasites, viruses, and toxins. Still, there are ways to stay well.

  • Eat only cooked produce that’s served hot. Wash all fruits with treated water and peel them yourself. Avoid salads, raw fruits and vegetables, and unpasteurized juices.
  • Eat thoroughly cooked meat, poultry, seafood, and eggs. Avoid foods served from food carts unless they’re cooked in front of you.
  • Enjoy pasteurized dairy products and hard cheeses. Avoid soft cheeses and unpasteurized yogurt.
  • Choose foods with little moisture, such as bread and crackers. Packaged dry foods are generally considered safe.
  • Drink beverages that are bottled and sealed. Check the seals because some merchants might fill empty bottles with tap water and reseal the caps with glue. Boil tap water for at least 3 minutes before making tea or coffee. And serve it steaming hot. Avoid ice too.

There might be times when you’re an invited guest, so you’ll be expected to eat what’s served. Be mindful of local eating customs, so that you’re respectful and safe while enjoying your meal.

By keeping these tips in mind, you should be able to thrive in your new locale and return home with great eating adventures to tell.

Raise healthy eaters—Part 2: Age-specific tips

Part 2 of HPRC’s “healthy eater” series explores age-specific tips to get your kids to eat healthy.

Children need guidance from their parents about eating a well-balanced diet. As they grow, your interactions with them around food will change. They’ll take on more responsibility for feeding themselves too. Still, you’ll continue to influence their eating preferences through the foods you prepare and offer to them. Read on for age-specific tips to encourage your kids’ healthy eating too. And if you haven’t seen it yet, be sure to read Part 1 about general nutrition tips for helping your children learn how to be “healthy eaters” at all ages. Read more...

Raise healthy eaters—Part 1: For kids 2–18

It’s important to teach children about acceptable eating behaviors and how to control their eating impulses. In this two-part series, HPRC offers tips to help your kids eat healthy.

How you approach feeding your children influences their food choices, the amount they eat, and their weight. While it’s important for kids to maintain a healthy weight, it’s also helpful for them to determine when they’re hungry and when they’re full.

Insisting kids eat more after they say they’re full can interfere with their ability to learn what “being full” really feels like. Trust that your child’s brain is sending signals back and forth to his or her belly, indicating “full.” And if children are offered a selection of generally healthy foods, they’ll eat the right amount and grow healthy. Read the rest of this article for specific tips you can use to help your own children eat healthfully as they grow.  

Can Olympians motivate your eating?

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
Many of us will be glued to our TVs, watching the Olympic Games over the next several days. What can we learn about nourishing our bodies from these elite athletes?

Olympic athletes follow a rigorous training schedule with their eyes on the Gold, and what they eat and drink can make a winning difference! Most of them work with sports dietitians to help reach their nutrition goals. However, others can learn from their examples as well:

  • Food fuels and nourishes your body to help you perform well. Olympic athletes teach the importance of nutritious fueling every day by including the right balance of foods and beverages for each workout and event.
  • Successful Olympians jump-start their days with breakfasts that include protein and carbohydrate-rich foods. This keeps them energized and ready for the next challenge.
  • It’s important to keep a healthy relationship with food. Food is more than fuel. Even after eating to meet a specific goal, sometimes it’s still healthy to eat a favorite food just because you’re in the mood. However, some Olympians are at greater risk of eating disorders, especially those who become too focused on body image and develop an unhealthy relationship with food.
  • There’s no one-size-fits-all approach to calorie needs. Some endurance athletes take in over 5,000 calories daily. The United States Olympic Committee provides helpful eating guidelines for its athletes.

Remember that the goal for a healthy lifestyle is something greater than Gold: your wellness!

Fun facts: Did you know that the Armed Forces Sports (AFS) program paves the way for service members to compete in national, Olympic, and international athletic competitions?

Let’s cheer on the 16 Armed Forces members participating in Rio’s Olympic Games and those who will compete in the Paralympics next month.

Go team USA!

Food tips for your PCS

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
Filed under: Food, Moving, PCS
Is a move on your horizon? Add an “eating plan” to your checklist.

Packing up and heading to a new location can be stressful, even for service members who move often. Get a jump on your planning and use these “food resource” tips to ensure a smooth transition.

  • Plan meals. A few weeks before you move, inventory your food. Create weekly meal plans (and choose recipes) to use up what’s on hand, especially those foods you can’t take along.
  • Gift excess food. Give condiments and opened foods to a favorite neighbor. Although most unopened foods can go with your household goods, you can donate any excess to a food pantry if you want to save on weight. Some moving companies even offer this as a free service!
  • Pack a food box. Choose a clear plastic box and add basics—such as cereal, nut butter, jelly, coffee, and teas—for the first few days in your new home. Include an easy microwave meal such as red beans and instant rice too. And add a coffee pot, utensils, bowls, plates, plastic zip-type bags (in assorted sizes), dish soap, sponge, and a towel for cleanup. Send it in the moving truck or take it with you. Either way, plan accordingly.
  • Pack a cooler. Driving to your new location? Bring water, baby carrots, apples, or dried fruit for the car ride.
  • Manage overseas or regional moves. Contact your installation's family support office and ask about borrowing kitchenware essentials, especially if you don’t own any or expect them to arrive late. Remember to stock up on your favorite non-perishables—either hard-to-find or unavailable in your new location—and send them along with your household goods.
  • Unload and unpack. Make sure you’re properly fueled and hydrated if you’re doing any heavy lifting on move-in day. And forgo any alcohol.

 Happy trails! 

RSS Feed