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How are you at handling criticism?

Maybe you can dish it out, but can you take it?

You’ve heard the expression about being able to dish it out, but not being able to take it. Is there some truth to that? Being on the receiving end of criticism can be difficult, especially in a close relationship, and can provoke anger. If you think that avoiding, denying, making excuses, or fighting back are the best ways to handle criticism, take note of how many times those tactics have made it worse instead. The next time you feel criticized, try this: Listen to what is being said, ask for details, agree with your critic’s right to his or her opinion, and use the criticism as a learning opportunity. If you need time to think about what they are saying or to calm down, saying “Let me think about it” might be a good way to get some space.

Activities help kids during times of deployment

Children feel lots of different things while their parent is deployed. There are organizations that can help kids through physical activity, peer mentoring, and other social gatherings.

Having something to keep children’s minds and bodies busy can make time pass faster and give them a sense of pride while their mom or dad is away. There are various organizations to help support children of deployed parents and keep them active and involved in their community. The U.S. Army has Operation Military Kid, which connects families to local resources to achieve a sense of community. Our Military Kids specifically reaches out to dependents of the National Guard, reservists, and active-duty wounded warriors. The Department of Defense has a new campaign, Operation Live Well, which includes resources to keep military children active and resilient during their guardian’s deployments. There are also numerous non-profit organizations that offer programming for military children—check out the National Resource Directory section for children’s programs near you.

Set your calorie goals

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
USDA’s SuperTracker has added a new personal calorie feature.

The United States Department of Agriculture’s Supertracker has added a unique and helpful feature that allows users to set calorie target recommendations prescribed by nutritionists, dietitians, and healthcare providers. SuperTracker, a free online tool released in 2011, allows users to assess daily healthy food and lifestyle choices and track their progress. With the newly added feature, users will be able to tailor their unique needs.

Happy trails to you!

Take advantage of the beautiful outdoors and take your family for a hike or run along a trail.

Exercising outdoors can be a fun way to get in shape, enjoy the beautiful weather and do something fun as a family. No gym or equipment is necessary for a run on a trail, bike ride, or hike—and the scenery is much better! Kids can use their scooter, skateboard, or bike to keep up with mom and/or dad. You can even include strength exercises during your outside adventure! A playground or park can be a great destination for some exercise with children. Monkey bars, park benches, and other fixtures found at playgrounds can be used for pull-ups, tricep dips, and core exercises. Here are some additional suggestions from HPRC on exercising without a gym or equipment. And before you step outside, check out these tips if you plan on hiking or running on a trail.

Ready, set, play!

Childhood obesity is a fast-growing issue in the United States. Preventing it can be a fun family affair!

Chubby cheeks on little ones are cute, but you want your child to outgrow them. The number of obese and overweight children has almost tripled since 1980, resulting in an increase in cardiovascular disease and other health issues—a trend reflected in the body-fat condition of today’s military trainees. Doing activities as a family not only gets kids moving, but also gets you moving! Children need at least 60 minutes a day of play involving moderate to vigorous exercise. This can be done throughout the day— at recess, during after school activities, playing at home—and doesn’t have to be done all at once. Let’s Move! has a list of simple steps you can do to encourage your child to live a healthy lifestyle. One idea: Have a house rule of doing jumping jacks during television commercials. For even more ideas, check out the CDC’s Strategies and Solutions for parents and communities.

Operation Live Well

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
Operation Live Well, a recently launched campaign from the Department of Defense, seeks to promote and sustain the health of service members, families, veterans, and retirees.

Are you looking for ways to promote your health or the health of your family? Operation Live Well, a DoD initiative, provides a wealth of information each month on a targeted topic. September is National Cholesterol Education Month and National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month. High blood cholesterol puts you at risk for heart disease, the number one killer of men and women in the United States. Encouraging family physical fitness can instill a lifetime of healthy habits and decrease risks for problems such as heart disease, diabetes, and certain types of cancer. Check back often to see new topics and explore methods to improve and sustain your well-being!

HPRC’s new Performance Strategy on couples communication

HPRC offers a set of strategies you can put to work on improving communication with your “significant other.”

Have you ever wondered what a truly healthy relationship looks like? Did you know some arguments can be healthy? And are you curious as to what the difference is between a healthy argument and an unhealthy one? If you are, you’ll want to check out HPRC’s Performance Strategy on couples communication that highlights strategies you can instantly apply to your relationships.

Don’t light up—lace up!

There are many tools and resources to keep you on track when you’re trying to quit smoking. One weapon in your arsenal is exercise.

Congratulations—you’ve decided to quit smoking! This is the first step toward a healthier and longer life. It may be difficult at first, and you may have cravings along the way, but stay strong and don’t give in. One way to fight those urges is exercise. Numerous studies have found that exercise and physical activity reduce cravings for cigarettes. The quick fix for a bad craving can be as easy as walking the dog or going out for a bike ride. Not only are you replacing unhealthy behavior with healthy ones, you’re also getting fit in the process!

Fun activities for single Warfighters

Military facilities offer lots of options for family activities, but there are programs for single Warfighters too.

Earlier this summer we highlighted a couple of military family programs for Warfighters and their family members. Did you know there are also programs for single Warfighters with the goal of enhancing morale and promoting fun, recreational activities?

The Army has the Better Opportunities for Single Soldiers (BOSS) program, which is open to all services, National Guardsmen, Reservists and Department of Defense civilians; the Navy has its Liberty Program, the Marines have the Single Marine Program (SMP), and the Air Force has the Single Airman Initiative Program (SAP). For more information, check out The Real Warriors campaign’s website, which describes these programs in more detail.

Single service member programs could be a great way to expand your social circle and have fun.

Get moving to help manage PTSD

Research has found that those with PTSD are at higher risk for cardiovascular disease; for some, exercise might be a great addition to other types of treatment.

The physical and emotional stress associated with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) can raise your blood pressure and cholesterol and increase body mass index, all of which are risk factors for heart disease. Veterans suffering from PTSD are more than twice as likely to die from a heart attack than those without PTSD. While the exact relationship between PTSD and heart disease is not fully understood, we know that regular exercise can help prevent heart disease and other risk factors, which could be helpful for those with PTSD. Some types of exercise can be effective in reducing psychological symptoms associated with PTSD and also can play a role in reducing unhealthy behaviors such as smoking, being overweight, and physical inactivity—sometimes byproducts of trying to cope. If you think that exercise might help you or a loved one cope with PTSD, speak with your healthcare provider to assess how much and what kind of exercise is best!

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