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Alerts

FDA warns consumers about caffeine powder. 

FDA advises consumers to stop using any supplement products labeled as OxyElite Pro or VERSA-1. Please see the following advisories: FDA -10/08/13, FDA - 10/11/13 and CDC - 10/08/13.

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Announcements

New article on reporting side effects of supplements
Just published in The New England Journal of Medicine: A recent article brings up dietary supplement issues you need to be aware of and discusses how dietary supplement side effects could be monitored better. A PDF of the April 3rd article is available free online.

3rd International Congress on Soldiers’ Physical Performance
August 18-21, 2014
The ICSPP delivers innovative scientific programming on soldiers’ physical performance with experts from around the world.

DMAA list updated for April 2014

Fueling Performance Photo Campaign
Share photos of how you fuel your performance and be featured on our Facebook page!

Dietary supplement module
Earn continuing education credits (if eligible) for this two-hour online module.

Operation LiveWell

Performance Triad

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Filed under: Healthy behaviors

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Protect your skin from the sun

HPRC Fitness Arena:
With the hot sun of summer, make sure your skin is protected when exercising outdoors.

With the hot sun of summer, make sure your skin is protected when exercising outdoors. This isn't just a cosmetic issue, but a health issue, as well. Apply enough sunblock of the correct type for the exercise you're performing outdoors. Visit Environment, Health, and Safety Online for general sun safety tips.

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Antioxidant supplementation for performance enhancement?

HPRC Fitness Arena:
Should you take antioxidants after endurance training?

Recent research suggests that antioxidant (vitamins A and E) supplementation has no effect on exercise performance after strenuous endurance training in individuals without vitamin deficiencies. Instead of taking antioxidant supplements to enhance performance, it’s more beneficial to eat a balanced diet with lots of fruits and vegetables.

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Optimize your relationships!

HPRC Fitness Arena:
Everyone can benefit from learning relationship enhancement skills.

In our previous post, we talked about why family relationships are important for Warfighter performance. This week, we’ve identified strategies for enhancing one’s relationships, based on the latest research we’ve read. Just like our bodies, relationships can be made stronger with training.

Think about adding the following strategies to your “relationship fitness plan.” They can be used in any close relationship: with your partner, your child, other family, or friends.

1) Relationships need work before problems arise. Many programs, like the Comprehensive Soldier Fitness Program and the One Shot One Kill v2.0 Resilience Program, address this concept of prevention. Just as you don’t start training for combat the day before a mission, you shouldn’t start relationship training after issues arise. Your relationship fitness plan should include practicing these behaviors:

Appreciate your loved ones through words or deeds.

Obey the Golden Rule: Treat others as you want to be treated.

Put yourself in the other person’s shoes. When in a fight, stop and ask yourself what the true message is behind the other person’s words.

Listening openly rather than reacting to angry behavior can head off an argument.

Communicate using “I-statements,” rather than blaming statements beginning with “you.” Start with an “I” and clearly state what you want to say from your perspective.

Keep negative comments and interactions to a minimum. For every one negative comment or interaction, five positive ones are needed to balance it out.

Soften your “start-up.” Conversations that turn into fights can be predicted from the start of the conversation. If a conversation begins with angry tones, high-pitched voices, or aggressive behavior, it can quickly escalate into an argument.

Keep things in perspective. Focus on the bright side.

Have fun. Remember to laugh together and have fun.

2) Relationship problems don’t go away by ignoring them. Being proactive by addressing recurring problems can go a long way towards fewer problems and creating less stress in the long run.

3) Timing is everything. Be strategic about when you address problems. When emotions are high, you’re more likely to say things without first thinking them through. With sensitive issues, take a break and address the issue when everyone is calm. At the very least, break from the argument for the time it would take to drink a glass of water.

4) Practice good relationship skills during the good times, so you’re prepared in difficult times. Just as Warfighters constantly train in order to be prepared for the difficulties they might encounter, relationship skills require practice before they’re put to the test in stressful situations.

The above strategies can help your relationships be positive forces in your life – and with less stress and more love, you can handle the rest of your life better.

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Why are family relationships important for Warfighter performance?

HPRC Fitness Arena:
The awareness that family well-being is crucial to Warfighter readiness and success is growing.

The awareness that family well-being is crucial to Warfighter readiness and success is growing. Admiral Mullen’s talk at the Total Fitness Conference in December centered on the importance of the family for total Warfighter fitness. There are numerous programs designed to support the Warfighter’s family – from Family Readiness Groups to advice and counseling services. But other than the common knowledge that military life can be hard on families, why are family relationships so important to Warfighter performance?

For many of us, everything we do, all the choice and decisions we make, are with our families in mind (be it parents, spouses, children, or siblings). This is because relationships enrich our lives. At the same time, relationships can be a double-edged sword – while happy and supportive relationships help people deal with stress better, unsupportive relationships with lots of fighting are a source of stress. In fact, being in a difficult relationship can go beyond just being a source of stress – relationships can impact your health for better or for worse. People in supportive and loving relationships are in better health, rebound from pain and trauma faster, and heal faster than those in unsupportive and negative relationships.

Now imagine the impact a personal relationship filled with a lot of conflict could have on a Warfighter’s ability to be successful in theater, and on returning home from a demanding tour.

The military lifestyle, with its long and stressful deployments and multiple moves, can take a toll even on the best relationships. But stepping outside of the military for a moment, relationship happiness is a major problem for most Americans. Divorce statistics in this country speak for the state of most relationships, and surveys show that of the 50 percent of couples who stay married, less than half report actually being happy with their spouse.

The good news about relationships, though, is that they can improve!

Learning the relationship skills that strengthen families and ease problem areas is something everyone can do. The saying “relationships take work” is true, but the work we put in can powerfully benefit all of our relationships. The importance of these skills is recognized by the Army’s Comprehensive Soldier Fitness program, which focuses on prevention and enhancing family relationships as key components of Warfighter performance and success.

In next week's blog, the HPRC will identify what we think are the best strategies for enhancing one’s relationships, based on the research we’ve read. Just like our bodies, relationships also need daily training for optimal fitness. Check back next week for what we think should be in everyone’s “relationship fitness plan.”


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Does LOVE make you healthier?

HPRC Fitness Arena:
WebMD has compiled recent research on the amazing health effects of love, particularly in marriage.

Does LOVE make you healthier? WebMD has compiled recent research on the amazing health effects of love, particularly in marriage. Happily married individuals 1) live longer, 2) see the doctor less, 3) have lower blood pressure, 4) are less depressed and 5) anxious, 6) manage stress better, 7) manage pain better, 8) have fewer colds, 9) heal faster and 10) are happier. See the full article here.

Also, for tips on how to make your relationship better, visit the HPRC Family Matterspage.

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Healthy ever after: Being happily married is linked to better health and well-being

HPRC Fitness Arena:
Relationships have a profound impact on health and happiness.

Relationships have a profound impact on health and happiness (see HPRC Family Matters section for more information). Recent research confirms that supportive and happy marriages promote better health, and conversely, that conflictual and negative marriages contribute to poor health. These findings may not be specific to just legally married couples since some studies have shown that having a consistently close and intimate relationship fosters positive effects. Click here for the full article.

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Supplements alone will not reduce your disease risk

HPRC Fitness Arena:
There's no replacement for a healthy lifestyle–a sound diet and regular physical activity.

Remember, taking dietary supplements alone will not reduce your disease risk. You must engage in complementary behaviors such as healthy eating and regular physical activity. Visit the "Dietary Guidelines for Americans" publication for more information.

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Eating as a family in childhood leads to positive health behaviors in adolescence

HPRC Fitness Arena:
A study published in the Journal of Health Psychology found that the more often a family eats together in childhood, the more likely an adolescent is to exhibit effective coping skills, good communication skills AND the less likely they are to smoke and feel high levels of stress in late adolescence.

A study published in the Journal of Health Psychology examined females age 9-19 and found that the more often a family eats together in childhood (i.e. before age 12), the more likely the adolescent is to exhibit effective coping skills, good communication skills AND the less likely they are to smoke and feel high levels of stress in late adolescence. For the full study, see Franko, D., Thompson, D., Affenito, S., Barton, B., & Striegel-Moore, R. (2008). What mediates the relationship between family meals and adolescent health issues?” Health Psychology, 27(2), S109-S117.

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