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Women and heart disease

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Heart disease is the number-one killer for both men and women. Do you know how to reduce your risk?

Heart disease is the number-one killer for both men and women. A well-balanced diet, along with regular exercise, can reduce the risk of heart disease. New heart disease guidelines were recently issued, with particular focus on illnesses that increase the risk of cardiovascular disease in women. For more information, read the news release and information about the new guidelines, which include information about the American Heart Association’s “Go Red for Women” campaign.

 

 

Consume less salt

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The daily recommended intake has gone down.

The American Heart Association recently reduced the recommended daily intake of sodium, or salt, to 1500 mg or less per day. High salt intake is associated with increased risk of blood pressure, heart attack, stroke, and kidney disease and many Americans are at risk. Read about daily recommendations and the benefits of consuming less salt by clicking here.

Eat to protect your heart

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Experts from MedicineNet, the American Dietetic Association, and the Cleveland Clinic developed a heart-healthy food pictures slideshow. Besides pictures, the slideshow also includes menu ideas to help you easily use these foods in your daily diet.

Experts from MedicineNet, the American Dietetic Association, and the Cleveland Clinic developed a heart-healthy food pictures slideshow. Besides pictures, the slideshow also includes menu ideas to help you easily use these foods in your daily diet. The foods that protect against heart disease include: salmon, flaxseed, oatmeal, black or kidney beans, almonds, walnuts, red wine, tuna, tofu, brown rice, soy milk, blueberries, carrots, spinach, broccoli, sweet potatoes, red bell peppers, asparagus, oranges, tomatoes, acorn squash, cantaloupe, papaya, dark chocolate, and squash.

Running a marathon can affect your heart

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Businessweek.com is reporting on a new study that suggests that running a marathon can damage your heart, with more than half of the segments in the heart's main pumping chamber typically functioning a little under par during the race.

imageofjoggercardiogram_shutterstock.jpgImage: Shutterstock.com

Businessweek.com is reporting on a new study that suggests that running a marathon can damage your heart, with more than half of the segments in the heart's main pumping chamber typically functioning a little under par during the race. The good news is that other parts of the heart pick up the slack and the changes reverse within three months or fewer after the run, the researchers found.

The end result is that the study shows that the more fit and trained a runner is, the less effect the strain of a marathon was found to have on the heart.

Click on link below to access the article.

Marathons Affect Heart, but Runners Bounce Back

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Take the stairs, not the elevator

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Improve your cardiovascular health on the stairs.

A few minutes a day of stair climbing can improve your cardiovascular health, a recent study finds. A study of sedentary college-aged women who walked 199 stair steps a day the first week, and who worked up to six ascents, or climbs, a day by the sixth week, were significantly more fit (heart rate, oxygen uptake, blood lactate levels and increased HDL) by the end than in the beginning.

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