You are here: Home / HPRC Blog

Filed under: Heart

Solid fats vs. oils

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
Solid fats vs. oils can make a difference in the overall makeup of a healthy diet, and choosing unsaturated oils can help lower blood cholesterol.

Solid fats are solid at room temperature, come mainly from animal products, and are high in saturated or trans fats. Examples are butter, milk fat, cream, stick margarine, shortening, and beef, chicken, and pork fat. Some saturated fats increase blood cholesterol levels in the body. Oils are liquid at room temperature, and come from many different plants, and are good sources of heart healthy unsaturated fats. Examples are olive oil, canola oil, safflower oil, corn oil, soybean oil, and peanut oil. Coconut oil, palm oil, and palm kernel oil are high in saturated fats and are considered solid fats. When using fats, replacing solid fats with unsaturated oils will provide essential nutrients to the diet and help lower blood cholesterol levels. Read about food preparation to promote health for more information.

Know your cholesterol numbers

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
Do you know what your HDL and LDL numbers are?

Good cholesterol, or high-density lipoprotein (HDL), helps prevent fat and cholesterol from clogging your arteries. A higher HDL number (> 60 mg/dl of blood) is better. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is considered bad cholesterol. It carries cholesterol to your arteries and can cause them to become blocked. A lower LDL number (< 100 mg/dl) is better. High-LDL or low-HDL cholesterol levels are major risk factors for heart disease and stroke. Visit this American Hearth Association web page for more information.

Understanding the risk of metabolic syndrome

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
High blood pressure, extra fat around your waist, high cholesterol levels, and type 2 diabetes are separate health risk factors, but collectively these conditions will increase your risk for metabolic syndrome and increase your chance of developing heart disease, stroke, and diabetes. Read what you can do to help decrease your risk.

Most people understand what it means to have high blood pressure, excess fat around the middle, a high cholesterol level, and the importance of addressing these health problems. What some may not realize is how serious the situation becomes when a person has been diagnosed with three or more such conditions in conjunction with other health issues.

This occurrence is called metabolic syndrome.

People who suffer from this combination of conditions (a reported one in four—50 million in the United States alone) have a dramatically increased risk for developing heart disease, type-2 diabetes, or a stroke. Individually, these symptoms pose a health risk, but identified together they raise the risk for cardiovascular disease.

Metabolic syndrome is characterized by a cluster of symptoms that include excess fat in the abdominal area (as measured by waist circumference), borderline or high blood pressure, high cholesterol that fosters plaque buildup in arteries, insulin resistance or glucose intolerance indicating the body can’t properly use insulin, raising blood sugar levels, and the presence of a protein in the blood, which can cause inflammation.

People with metabolic syndrome have at least three of the following risk factors:

  • Excessive body fat around the waist
  • Low levels of HDL ("good") cholesterol
  • High levels of triglycerides (a type of blood fat)
  • Elevated blood pressure
  • Elevated glucose (blood sugar) levels after fasting

The complications of metabolic syndrome are serious and, if not addressed, can cause major health problems. If you are overweight and don't yet have these problems, keep in mind that the older you get, the more likely you are to develop them. Older adults can develop metabolic syndrome without being overweight, so it is important to get annual physical exams.

What can be done to prevent metabolic syndrome? If you are fall into the categories above or are overweight, one way to reduce your risk of metabolic syndrome is to incorporate healthy habits such as starting an exercise regimen. (But be sure to consult your doctor before starting a new exercise program, especially if you have not been active for a while.)

Diet is also key to reducing the risk of metabolic syndrome. By making small changes in your diet—such as decreasing the number of calories you take in per day; eating more fruits, vegetables, whole grain products, and low-fat meals, and avoiding fast/fried/fatty/oily foods—you can reduce your chances of developing metabolic syndrome.

If you would like to know more about metabolic syndrome, we recommend the following resources:

Metabolic Syndrome – PubMed Health

Metabolic Syndrome – American Heart Association

Monitor your physical performance using your heart rate

HPRC Fitness Arena:
Your heart is the key to effective training. Learn how to monitor it during exercise to achieve the optimum results from your training program.

Monitor your heart rate to ensure that you are training in the appropriate range for your performance needs. This simple practice will help you track the way your body responds to training to effectively optimize your physical performance. The American Council on Exercise (ACE) has information on how to monitor your exercise intensity using your heart rate, as well as an online tool for calculating your target heart rate. A similar online calculator is available from the Army’s Hooah 4 Health website.

Running a marathon can affect your heart

HPRC Fitness Arena: is reporting on a new study that suggests that running a marathon can damage your heart, with more than half of the segments in the heart's main pumping chamber typically functioning a little under par during the race.

imageofjoggercardiogram_shutterstock.jpgImage: is reporting on a new study that suggests that running a marathon can damage your heart, with more than half of the segments in the heart's main pumping chamber typically functioning a little under par during the race. The good news is that other parts of the heart pick up the slack and the changes reverse within three months or fewer after the run, the researchers found.

The end result is that the study shows that the more fit and trained a runner is, the less effect the strain of a marathon was found to have on the heart.

Click on link below to access the article.

Marathons Affect Heart, but Runners Bounce Back

Journal entry icon

Take the stairs, not the elevator

HPRC Fitness Arena:
Improve your cardiovascular health on the stairs.

A few minutes a day of stair climbing can improve your cardiovascular health, a recent study finds. A study of sedentary college-aged women who walked 199 stair steps a day the first week, and who worked up to six ascents, or climbs, a day by the sixth week, were significantly more fit (heart rate, oxygen uptake, blood lactate levels and increased HDL) by the end than in the beginning.

RSS Feed