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RegenESlim Appetite Control Capsules voluntarily recalled due to the presence of DMAA.

FDA warns consumers about caffeine powder. 

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New article on reporting side effects of supplements
Just published in The New England Journal of Medicine: A recent article brings up dietary supplement issues you need to be aware of and discusses how dietary supplement side effects could be monitored better. A PDF of the April 3rd article is available free online.

3rd International Congress on Soldiers’ Physical Performance
August 18-21, 2014
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Filed under: Heat related illness

Summertime heat poses risk for soldiers' PT

HPRC Fitness Arena: Environment, Total Force Fitness
This summer has produced an exceptional amount of record heat across the U.S. This has impacted the Army’s PT with two incidences of soldier death and several cases of heat-related illness.

The ArmyTimes reported that due to this summer’s excessive heat wave, which affected most of the United States, the Army’s physical training has been impacted by two heat-related deaths and several cases of soldiers who became ill in the heat and sought medical treatment for heat injuries. According to the article, Army officials are looking for better ways to handle the heat and keep soldiers from succumbing to it.

Heat injuries can be a cause of both illness and fatalities. The Environment: Heat section of HPRC’s website provides valuable information on policies, reports, and guidelines for surviving and performing in hot environments.

How extreme heat conditions affect the body

HPRC Fitness Arena: Environment
Extreme heat poses a high risk and can impair the body's ability to regulate core temperatures that can lead to a variety of heat-related illnesses such as dehydration and heat stroke.

With hot, humid conditions expected to last through the week, the Los Angeles Times featured an article that explains how the body senses life-threatening danger and starts fighting to keep cool when the temperature rises in extreme heat conditions. Those at highest risk include people over age 60 and those who are overweight or have heart disease, diabetes, or respiratory problems. Being aware of the symptoms of heat illness and taking preventive measures to stay cool and hydrated are the keys to protecting against heat-related illness.

Heat stress is a concern even for the fittest Warfighter

HPRC Fitness Arena:
Heat acclimatization is the process of giving your body the time needed to adapt to exertion in extreme heat. Even the fittest Warfighters need to take time to acclimatize.

Heat-related injuries are a threat to Warfighters, even those in top physical condition, deployed to extreme environments. Heat acclimatization is necessary to ensure that the health and performance of Warfighters is not compromised to a dangerous degree when exposed to heat stress.

Take it slow. For unacclimatized Warfighters, physical exertion should be limited in intensity and time. Allow 9-14 days of progressive heat exposure and exertion—more for less-fit Warfighters, less for more-fit Warfighters.

Don’t overdo it; don’t underdo it! Heat acclimatization requires exposure at least two hours per day (can be two one-hour segments) while engaged in a cardiovascular exercise (which should increase in intensity each day of the acclimatization period).

It’s all relative. The level of heat acclimatization achieved is relative to the exertion normally expended by the Warfighter. If light exertion is the norm, the level of heat acclimatization after two weeks will match that. If more strenuous exertion is called for, additional acclimatization and possibly improved fitness is required.

Work smart. If Warfighters must perform physical work during the acclimatization period, take advantage of the cooler hours during the morning, evening, and night.

Stay hydrated. Adequate water is essential. Heat acclimatization increases sweating and, therefore, water requirements. Dehydration rapidly degrades safety and performance, even for those who are already heat acclimatized or in top physical condition.

For a more detailed look at heat stress and acclimatization, read HPRC’s reports on managing heat exposure.

Train in warm weather to improve performance anytime

HPRC Fitness Arena:
Science Daily reports on a new study published in the Journal of Applied Physiology that indicates training in warm weather not only improves heat acclimation and performance in the heat, but also improves performance in cool conditions.

Science Daily reports on a new study published in the Journal of Applied Physiology which indicates that training in warm weather not only improves heat acclimation and performance in the heat, but also improves performance in cool conditions. Click here for more details about the study.

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Preventing heat-related illness

HPRC Fitness Arena:
What to drink when you're working out in hot environments.

When performing physical activities in the heat, avoid drinking liquids that contain alcohol or large amounts of sugar since these actually cause you to lose more body fluid. Also avoid very cold drinks, because they may cause stomach cramps.

Click here for the Center for Disease Control and Prevention's article on Emergency Preparedness and Response.

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After heatstroke, when is it safe to exercise?

HPRC Fitness Arena:
Heatstroke is a potentially deadly consequence of exercising. "This is a very controversial area, even more so than concussions," said Dr. Francis G. O'Connor, president of the American Medical Society of Sports Medicine. He moderated a debate on the topic at a recent meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine.



From the June 15, 2010 edition of the New York Times.

Heatstroke is a potentially deadly consequence of exercising. "This is a very controversial area, even more so than concussions," said Dr. Francis G. O'Connor, president of the American Medical Society of Sports Medicine. He moderated a debate on the topic at a recent meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine.

See the full text of this article.

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