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Filed under: Holidays

Retrain your brain: Mindful eating for the holidays

Filed under: Diet, Holidays, Nutrition
Mindful eating can help you relish in holiday meals without overindulging.

The holiday season is in full swing, which means an abundance of family feasts and holiday parties. But you can keep your nutrition in check and still eat balanced meals and snacks by practicing “mindful eating,” a form of mindfulness.

Mindful eating allows you to embrace food, nourish your body, and feel satisfied without overindulging. It means being more aware of your eating habits, eating cues, and sensations. When you eat mindfully, you learn to savor every aspect of your meal with all of your senses and become more conscious of your feelings of fullness. And while mindful eating isn’t a diet, it has been found to help with portion control and weight loss.

Try these mindful eating exercises before, during, and after your holiday get-togethers:

1)    Recognize your feelings of hunger and fullness. Try to understand the reason you want to eat. Is it true physical hunger? Or do you tend to eat when your emotions are running high, such as when you’re stressed? Perhaps you saw or smelled something delicious, and all of a sudden your stomach is rumbling. Eat when you’re hungry. Don’t skip a meal just because you have a holiday party later in the day. If you wait until you’re starving, you might end up eating more than two meals’ worth. After you’ve had your first helping of food, wait about 10–20 minutes to determine if you’re still hungry or if you feel satisfied.

2)    Savor your food. You can have your pumpkin pie and eat it too. Even calorie-rich foods can be eaten mindfully. First choose a sensible portion size. Then eat slowly, chew your food thoroughly, and put your fork down between each bite. Enjoy every taste, texture, smell, and sight of your food. Mindful eating also teaches us not to be judgmental about our food choices—there is no right or wrong way to eat!

3)    Anticipate distractions and come prepared. People tend to eat more during social gatherings because there are more distractions and a greater number of food options. Be mindful of how your food choices nourish your body and support your health and well-being.

You can achieve healthy holidays by sticking to your eating plan and enjoying it too. All you have to do is retrain your brain!

Don’t be holi-dazed & confused about food safety

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
The kitchen can be hectic during the holidays. Here are some helpful tips to keep your food, your family, and your holiday guests safe.

Do you know that one in six Americans get sick from foodborne illnesses each year? Thankfully, there are safety tips and techniques that can help you prevent such incidents. Here are some quick and easy tips to remember:

Clean: Wash your hands and surfaces thoroughly and frequently with hot, soapy water.

Separate: When shopping, preparing, and storing your meals, be sure to keep raw meats, poultry, seafood, and eggs away from other foods that won’t be cooked to prevent cross-contamination.

Cook: Use a food thermometer to ensure that your meats are cooked to the right temperature (165°F for turkey).

Chill: Don’t leave leftovers (including raw and cooked items, such as pies) out on the table for more than two hours. Promptly refrigerate these items, and use or discard leftovers within three to four days.

If food looks or smells questionable, a good rule of thumb to follow is, “When in doubt, throw it out.”

For more information on food safety, visit the Food and Drug Administration’s web page on Food Safety Tips for Healthy Holidays.

Balance your materialism this gift season

Filed under: Families, Holidays
In this season of buying, take a moment to learn about the science behind materialism and its link to your well-being.

With the holidays, sales, and gift-giving (and receiving) upon us, material items may be on your radar more than usual. Thinking about what to get for your significant other, parents, children, friends, and/or coworkers is on many people’s to-do lists. But where should we draw the line with materialism—that focus on the status symbols of money and possessions? And does having more really make us happier?

Ironically, some research has shown that materialism actually relates to feelings of lower well-being. Being more focused on material things can lead to greater feelings of insecurity and “neediness.” Interestingly, this doesn’t depend on personal or household income (though few studies included multimillionaires or the homeless). But it does suggest that materialism is an effect not of wealth but of one’s attitude towards material things.

This isn’t the same as the desire for money or financial success. Believing that money is important can actually improve your well-being. But your sense of well-being can suffer if you link your desire for money with status, image, success, and happiness.

So this holiday season, strike the balance that works for you and your family as to how much you should focus on material items versus other (spiritual, mental, and physical) ways to meet individual and family needs.

Honoring those who made Independence Day possible

HPRC Fitness Arena: Total Force Fitness
Take a moment this Independence Day to honor the history of our Armed Services.

Whatever else you have planned for the 4th of July, take a moment to reflect on what this celebration signifies and what we owe to our nation’s service members past and present for making and keeping this national holiday special.

Did you know some of our services are even older than our country? The U.S. Army was established on 14 June 1775, more than a year before our official separation from Great Britain. The U.S. Navy dates to just four months later, on 13 October 1775, with the Marine Corps created as part of the Navy on 10 November the same year.

Although the declaration that established the nation was still a year off, the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia acted to organize and fund the amateur troops that had formed in New England, making General George Washington the first commander-in-chief of the Continental Army on 3 July 1775.

The Navy originated in a similar fashion, through an act of the Continental Congress. Just two armed ships made up the initial fleet, which grew to roughly 20 active warships during the Revolutionary War. Two battalions of Marines were called for shortly after the fleet was initiated.

And so as you celebrate this national holiday, take a moment to remember those Warfighters who helped establish our country as well as those who have helped maintain it through more than 238 Independence Days. And thank those who are still doing so today!

Happy Mother’s Day!

Happy Mother’s Day from HPRC!

HPRC salutes Mother’s Day with special recognition of the mothers of Warfighters, mothers who are Warfighters, and Warfighters’ spouses who are mothers. HPRC works to help keep you and your Warfighter healthy, happy, and fit so that every day is Mother’s Day!

Keep the happy in holidays: Wrapping up

Filed under: Holidays, Mind
To wrap up our series on keeping the happy in holidays, we suggest you mix and match the tips we’ve presented over the past weeks during the upcoming New Year as well.

Over the last seven weeks, HPRC has run a series on tips for keeping the happy in holidays this season for you and your family. We highlighted many strategies, such as being a gratitude hunter, how to be more optimistic, and how to accept things you can’t control. We also highlighted tips for your relationships, such as setting appropriate expectations, identifying possible friction points ahead of time, and celebrating your family and friends. Look back over these in our Mind Tactics and Family & Relationships domains over the last seven weeks to review.

In wrapping up, our last tip is to remember that you know yourself best. Try a combination of the tips we highlighted each week to see which ones work for you, the ones that fit your strengths, and those that suit where you are right now in life. Ups and downs are common during the holiday season, but if you keep your perspective, stay realistic, make time for fitness, and foster new memories with your loved ones, this just might be your best New Year yet!

Keep the happy in holidays: Wrapping up

Wrapping up our series on keeping the happy in holidays, mix and match the tips we’ve presented each week during the upcoming new year, as well.

Over the last 7 weeks, HPRC has run a series on tips for keeping the happy in the holidays this season for you and your family. We highlighted many strategies like being a gratitude hunter, how to be more optimistic, and how to accept things you can’t control. We also highlighted tips for your relationships, such as setting appropriate expectations, identifying possible friction points ahead of time, and celebrating your family and friends. Look back over the last 7 weeks to read more.

In wrapping up, our last tip is to remember that you know yourself best. Try a combination of the tips we highlighted each week to see which ones work for you, the ones that fit your strengths and where you are right now in life. Ups and downs are common during the holiday season, but if you keep your perspective, stay realistic, make time for fitness, and foster new memories with your loved ones, this just might be your best new year yet!

Keep the happy in holidays: Check your drinking

Filed under: Alcohol, Holidays, Mind
New Year’s Eve—a best-seller occasion for champagne—is the perfect time to think about whether you drink too much.

Last week we highlighted stretching your mind and body while taking a break from the holiday season. This week’s tip—with New Year’s Eve upon us—is to check your drinking.

It’s easy to overindulge during the holidays. Celebrating usually causes us to both eat and drink too much. This holiday season, be careful that you don’t drink too much. According to the American Psychological Association, a “moderate” amount is no more than two drinks a day for men and one for women and older people. One drink is defined as 12 ounces of beer, five ounces of wine, or 1.5 ounces of spirits. Also, remember this important acronym: “HALT: Never drink if Hungry, Angry, Lonely, or Tired.” To learn more about what to look for or how to cut back, check out the factsheet “Do you drink too much?

For more information on alcohol use, check out HPRC’s Tobacco, Alcohol, and Drugs section.

Keep the happy in the holidays: Relationship resolutions

Happy New Year! As you begin 2014, consider having a relationship-oriented resolution.

Happy New Year! HPRC wishes you and your loved ones a happy and healthy 2014.

The New Year is a perfect time to reflect on where you are in your life and where you want to be in the coming months. When you set your resolutions, think about setting one around your primary relationships. Is there something that you could focus on this year that would make your relationships stronger? For example, what about taking a romantic getaway with just your partner at least once this year? Or how about staying in closer contact with your parents or best friend? Also, think about incorporating other areas of Total Force Fitness in your resolutions, such as physical fitness, nutrition, mental resilience, and your environment.

Keep the happy in the holidays: If you’re feeling pulled, try stretching

As you work on your happiness this holiday season, remember that it’s not just a mind thing; incorporate the physical activity of stretching too.

HPRC continues it series on keeping the happy in holidays, as last week we focused on practicing acceptance. This week, a simple tip: If you’re feeling pulled in a hundred different directions or have been too busy to simply sit and relax, find five minutes to stretch—both your body and your mind. In addition to being an important component of fitness, stretching can also help quiet your mind from the stress of the holidays. Try this basic stretching routine from the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM). While you’re at it, practice some of the other skills described in this series to foster happiness: examining your thoughts and practicing gratitude, acceptance, and optimism. Your body and mind will thank you.

HPRC’s website has more ideas on mind-body skills you can try this holiday season and New Year.

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