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Filed under: Holidays

Honoring those who made Independence Day possible

HPRC Fitness Arena: Total Force Fitness
Take a moment this Independence Day to honor the history of our Armed Services.

Whatever else you have planned for the 4th of July, take a moment to reflect on what this celebration signifies and what we owe to our nation’s service members past and present for making and keeping this national holiday special.

Did you know some of our services are even older than our country? The U.S. Army was established on 14 June 1775, more than a year before our official separation from Great Britain. The U.S. Navy dates to just four months later, on 13 October 1775, with the Marine Corps created as part of the Navy on 10 November the same year.

Although the declaration that established the nation was still a year off, the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia acted to organize and fund the amateur troops that had formed in New England, making General George Washington the first commander-in-chief of the Continental Army on 3 July 1775.

The Navy originated in a similar fashion, through an act of the Continental Congress. Just two armed ships made up the initial fleet, which grew to roughly 20 active warships during the Revolutionary War. Two battalions of Marines were called for shortly after the fleet was initiated.

And so as you celebrate this national holiday, take a moment to remember those Warfighters who helped establish our country as well as those who have helped maintain it through more than 238 Independence Days. And thank those who are still doing so today!

Happy Mother’s Day!

Happy Mother’s Day from HPRC!

HPRC salutes Mother’s Day with special recognition of the mothers of Warfighters, mothers who are Warfighters, and Warfighters’ spouses who are mothers. HPRC works to help keep you and your Warfighter healthy, happy, and fit so that every day is Mother’s Day!

Keep the happy in holidays: Wrapping up

Filed under: Holidays, Mind
To wrap up our series on keeping the happy in holidays, we suggest you mix and match the tips we’ve presented over the past weeks during the upcoming New Year as well.

Over the last seven weeks, HPRC has run a series on tips for keeping the happy in holidays this season for you and your family. We highlighted many strategies, such as being a gratitude hunter, how to be more optimistic, and how to accept things you can’t control. We also highlighted tips for your relationships, such as setting appropriate expectations, identifying possible friction points ahead of time, and celebrating your family and friends. Look back over these in our Mind Tactics and Family & Relationships domains over the last seven weeks to review.

In wrapping up, our last tip is to remember that you know yourself best. Try a combination of the tips we highlighted each week to see which ones work for you, the ones that fit your strengths, and those that suit where you are right now in life. Ups and downs are common during the holiday season, but if you keep your perspective, stay realistic, make time for fitness, and foster new memories with your loved ones, this just might be your best New Year yet!

Keep the happy in holidays: Wrapping up

Wrapping up our series on keeping the happy in holidays, mix and match the tips we’ve presented each week during the upcoming new year, as well.

Over the last 7 weeks, HPRC has run a series on tips for keeping the happy in the holidays this season for you and your family. We highlighted many strategies like being a gratitude hunter, how to be more optimistic, and how to accept things you can’t control. We also highlighted tips for your relationships, such as setting appropriate expectations, identifying possible friction points ahead of time, and celebrating your family and friends. Look back over the last 7 weeks to read more.

In wrapping up, our last tip is to remember that you know yourself best. Try a combination of the tips we highlighted each week to see which ones work for you, the ones that fit your strengths and where you are right now in life. Ups and downs are common during the holiday season, but if you keep your perspective, stay realistic, make time for fitness, and foster new memories with your loved ones, this just might be your best new year yet!

Keep the happy in holidays: Check your drinking

Filed under: Alcohol, Holidays, Mind
New Year’s Eve—a best-seller occasion for champagne—is the perfect time to think about whether you drink too much.

Last week we highlighted stretching your mind and body while taking a break from the holiday season. This week’s tip—with New Year’s Eve upon us—is to check your drinking.

It’s easy to overindulge during the holidays. Celebrating usually causes us to both eat and drink too much. This holiday season, be careful that you don’t drink too much. According to the American Psychological Association, a “moderate” amount is no more than two drinks a day for men and one for women and older people. One drink is defined as 12 ounces of beer, five ounces of wine, or 1.5 ounces of spirits. Also, remember this important acronym: “HALT: Never drink if Hungry, Angry, Lonely, or Tired.” To learn more about what to look for or how to cut back, check out the factsheet “Do you drink too much?

For more information on alcohol use, check out HPRC’s Tobacco, Alcohol, and Drugs section.

Keep the happy in the holidays: Relationship resolutions

Happy New Year! As you begin 2014, consider having a relationship-oriented resolution.

Happy New Year! HPRC wishes you and your loved ones a happy and healthy 2014.

The New Year is a perfect time to reflect on where you are in your life and where you want to be in the coming months. When you set your resolutions, think about setting one around your primary relationships. Is there something that you could focus on this year that would make your relationships stronger? For example, what about taking a romantic getaway with just your partner at least once this year? Or how about staying in closer contact with your parents or best friend? Also, think about incorporating other areas of Total Force Fitness in your resolutions, such as physical fitness, nutrition, mental resilience, and your environment.

Keep the happy in the holidays: If you’re feeling pulled, try stretching

As you work on your happiness this holiday season, remember that it’s not just a mind thing; incorporate the physical activity of stretching too.

HPRC continues it series on keeping the happy in holidays, as last week we focused on practicing acceptance. This week, a simple tip: If you’re feeling pulled in a hundred different directions or have been too busy to simply sit and relax, find five minutes to stretch—both your body and your mind. In addition to being an important component of fitness, stretching can also help quiet your mind from the stress of the holidays. Try this basic stretching routine from the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM). While you’re at it, practice some of the other skills described in this series to foster happiness: examining your thoughts and practicing gratitude, acceptance, and optimism. Your body and mind will thank you.

HPRC’s website has more ideas on mind-body skills you can try this holiday season and New Year.

Keep the happy in holidays: Celebrate your friends and family

Celebrate your friends and family this holiday season by showing them you appreciate them.

While it’s true that sometimes the ones we love the most are the ones who can really get under our skin, particularly during the holidays when everyone’s together (know what your irritators are and how to deal with them), it’s also true that many of us have reason to celebrate our family and friends.

Appreciation is a powerful tool in fostering strong relationships, but it’s often overlooked in the business of everyday life. This holiday season take the time to let your family and friends know that you appreciate them. This can be in words or actions—it could be as simple as just taking the time to let them know you love and appreciate them, or you could show your appreciation with a gesture. For example, maybe your brother or best friend hasn’t had time for his favorite hobby lately due to family responsibilities. By offering to babysit the kids for an afternoon, you’d give him the chance to take time for himself. Small things go a long way in showing appreciation—this holiday season and all next year.

For more ideas on strengthening relationships, check out the Family Relationships section of HPRC’s website.

Keep the happy in holidays: Practice acceptance

Accepting the things that invade your thoughts when you can’t avoid them or control them can help you keep happy this holiday season.

Last time we highlighted being aware of possible depression in those around you. This week, as we continue our series on keeping happy in the holidays, try practicing acceptance of the things you can’t control or avoid.

Problems can arise when you try to avoid thoughts or feelings rather than noticing them as they come and go. Instead of avoiding them, try to note your thoughts or feelings, accept them, and keep moving forward rather than dwelling on them. If you need or want to think about something further, pick a good time and place to think it through later. But if it’s outside your control, practicing acceptance can help separate the things you can control from those you can’t—and help you find some peace this holiday season.

Five tips for surviving holiday parties

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
Follow these simple strategies to avoid overindulging at holiday parties.

Holiday parties provide opportunities to relax and enjoy good food and good times with family, friends, and colleagues. But they also can derail your weight and fitness goals. Buffet tables laden with calorie-rich treats and beverages can weaken the resolve of even the most committed folks. To keep yourself on track, remember these tips:

  • Never go to a party hungry. Eat a protein-rich food before you go. Protein foods tell your brain that you’re satisfied and help you avoid overindulging. Low-fat milk or yogurt or a handful of nuts are great choices.
  • Follow the MyPlate strategies for filling your party plate: Fill half your plate with fruits and vegetables then fill the rest with whole grains and lean protein such as fish or chicken.
  • Choose wine over fancy mixed drinks or beer, and be sure to drink in moderation: one drink for women and two drinks for men. Sip slowly to make your drink last through the evening.
  • If it’s a potluck, you really are in luck. Offer to bring a healthy salad or entrée, and fill your plate with your own delicious creation.
  • Don’t waste your calories (and taste buds) on desserts that you don’t absolutely love. Choose your favorite and then share it with a friend. You’ll eat slower while you and your friend chat, and cherish the moment as much as the sweet!
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