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Alerts

RegenESlim Appetite Control Capsules voluntarily recalled due to the presence of DMAA.

FDA warns consumers about caffeine powder. 

FDA advises consumers to stop using any supplement products labeled as OxyElite Pro or VERSA-1. Please see the following advisories: FDA -10/08/13, FDA - 10/11/13 and CDC - 10/08/13.

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Announcements

New article on reporting side effects of supplements
Just published in The New England Journal of Medicine: A recent article brings up dietary supplement issues you need to be aware of and discusses how dietary supplement side effects could be monitored better. A PDF of the April 3rd article is available free online.

3rd International Congress on Soldiers’ Physical Performance
August 18-21, 2014
The ICSPP delivers innovative scientific programming on soldiers’ physical performance with experts from around the world.

DMAA list updated for April 2014

Fueling Performance Photo Campaign
Share photos of how you fuel your performance and be featured on our Facebook page!

Dietary supplement module
Earn continuing education credits (if eligible) for this two-hour online module.

Operation LiveWell

Performance Triad

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Filed under: Marines

Happy 224th, U.S. Coast Guard!

HPRC Fitness Arena: Total Force Fitness
In honor of the anniversary of USCG, take a moment to learn a little about the background and mission of this essential branch of the U.S. armed forces.

On the 4th of August 2014, the United States Coast Guard will be 224 years old. The Coast Guard actually began as the Revenue-Marine, later renamed the Revenue Cutter Service, under the Department of the Treasury. Its original mission was to control the seagoing smuggling that was rampant in the years following the founding of the United States. Needing money to fuel the fledgling country, the Treasury used the Revenue Cutter Service to patrol the shores and ensure that importers paid tariffs on their goods.

For its first eight years, following founding in 1790, this was the U.S.’s only maritime armed service because the Navy had been disbanded after the Revolutionary War. During the War of 1812, after the Navy had been re-formed, the Revenue-Marine was put into military service under command of the Navy. This set a precedent in which the Cutter Service alternated between peacetime missions under the Treasury to control shoreline smuggling and piracy and wartime military operations under the Navy.

The U.S. Life-Saving Service was also part of USCG’s ancestry. Founded in 1848, this agency grew out of a Massachusetts volunteer service, whose aim was to help shipwrecked mariners. The Service operated out of shore-based stations that spread southwards from New England after the Great Carolina Hurricane of 1854 brought recognition and federal funding. In 1878, the Life-Saving Service was formed as a federal agency under the Department of the Treasury.

In 1915, the Revenue Cutter Service and the Life-Saving Service merged to form the United States Coast Guard, which later absorbed other marine-related Treasury agencies. Its scope expanded to cover smuggling, maritime rescue, shipping regulation, and wartime naval combat support and coastal protection. In 2003, the Coast Guard’s protective position was brought to the fore when it was transferred to the Department of Homeland Security.

This August 4th, take a moment to thank the members of our U.S. Coast Guard for all they do!

Marine Corps Embassy Security: New year, new requirements

If your goal is to serve in the Marine Corps Embassy Security Group, then you should know about the new requirements and fitness standards.

On January 14, 2014 the Marine Corps released MARADMIN 010/14, which details the new requirements for the Marine Corps Embassy Security Group. Marines who want to travel the globe and provide security services for U.S. embassies and consulates now have to meet new, revised standards. Among other things, Marines must be at least 64 inches tall so they can adequately view all areas from Post One (point of entry control at diplomatic posts). In addition, physical fitness standards have changed: Marines will have to achieve 1st Class PFT scores. If you haven’t yet achieved this level of fitness, we have some tips. First and foremost, for optimal fitness, be sure to train smarter, not harder.

HITT: The Basics

HPRC Fitness Arena: Total Force Fitness
Have you heard of HITT? It’s the High Intensity Tactical Training (HITT) program, and its primary purpose is to enhance fitness levels, combat readiness, and resiliency for the United States Marine.

There are many components that contribute to a Marine's optimal readiness, including physical fitness, diet and nutrition, injury prevention, and fatigue management. A balanced and effective approach for optimum performance and combat conditioning should address all four aspects. That’s where HITT comes in.

HITT is a comprehensive strength and conditioning program that takes into consideration the physical demands of operational activities to help Marines optimize their combat readiness. The HITT program focuses on the key components of superior speed, power, strength endurance, combat readiness, and injury prevention.

The four major components of the HITT program include:

  • Injury Prevention (including active dynamic warm-up)
  • Strength and Power
  • Speed, Agility, and Endurance
  • Flexibility and Core Stability

The HITT workout program can be customized as a training tool for a unit or an individual. It can also supplement your current training routine. The workouts are divided into three different modules to address each of the four components listed above.

  • Athlete HITT develops basic strength and speed using barbells, kettle bells, dumbbells, speed harnesses, resistance trainers, and sleds.
  • Combat HITT develops functional strength and endurance using suspension trainers, ammo cans, partner drills, and endurance training.
  • Warrior HITT develops explosive power and agility using Olympic lifts, plyometrics (jumping exercises), battle ropes, cones, hurdles, and ladders.

Exercise videos provide instruction and demonstrations on how to do the exercises and movement properly. The program also uses periodization to promote long-term training improvements while avoiding over-training. Lastly, the program is categorized into specific phases, each with its own objectives and set of training parameters:

  • Pre-Deployment Phase (Warrior, Combat, Athlete). The main goal is to build overall strength and performance, similar to “off-season training” in a traditional sport setting.
  • Deployment Phase (Combat). The objective is to maintain overall fitness levels and reduce the risk of injuries while deployed. This is the Marine’s “in-season training”.
  • Post-Deployment Phase (Athlete). The emphasis is reintegration/strengthening. If a Marine were to sustain injury or lose a significant level of performance, this phase would help get him/her return to full training status.

HITT is endorsed by the National Strength and Conditioning Associations (NSCA) Tactical Strength and Conditioning (TSAC) Department. By implementing the latest cutting-edge training methods and sound science, the HITT program builds fitness for today's tactical athlete – the United States Marine. Read more about HITT and other Marine fitness information on HPRC.

An app for U.S. Marines to HITT hard

Filed under: Apps, HITT, Marines
You can now access the Marine Corps’ HITT program on your smartphone.

The Marine Corps’ High Intensity Tactical Training (HITT) program is becoming more and more popular on Marine bases across the country. HITT is designed to enhance the operational fitness and optimize the combat readiness and resilience of U.S. Marines. You can now access the HITT library of exercises on the go: Download the HITT app from iTunes and Google play today!

Marines address boot camp injuries

Reducing injuries during boot camp is a priority for the Marine Corps; athletic trainers keep watch over recruits to ensure the 13-week training is as injury-free as possible.

The Los Angeles Times is reporting on how the Marine Corps has hired 27 certified athletic trainers—most with experience tending professional and college athletes—to oversee training for enlisted recruits and officer candidates at sites throughout the United States. According to the article, this is a new direction for the Corps: Not that long ago, the drill instructors might have dismissed recruits who complained of being injured and ordered them back into action.

To learn more about military recommendations for prevention of injuries related to physical training related, visit the HPRC’s Injury Management page and click on the link to read Recommendations for Prevention of Physical Training (PT)-Related Injuries.

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