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Filed under: Military families

New Army resilience training program targets NCOs and spouses

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The two-week Soldier 360° resilience training program for Warfighters and their spouses is being implemented by the Army with a focus on NCOs.

Soldier 360° is a resilience program being implemented by the Army for Warfighters who have combat experience and their families. In fact, Warfighters take the second half of the two-week class with their spouses, while childcare is provided for those who need it. It’s aimed at non-commissioned officers who are nominated by their commanders. The course provides Warfighters with information and strategies on stress management, anger management, relaxation, health, communication, conflict resolution, nutrition, sleep, combat stress, and management of non-optimal behaviors. It also teaches physical fitness, yoga, meditation, conditioning, injury prevention, and pain management. The program combines financial counseling with Military and Family Life Consultant Program counselors, acupuncturists, physicians, and a myriad of others. Read another article from Army.mil for more information.

Military Spouse Appreciation Day

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Military spouses are adaptable, committed, courageous, the backbone of the military family and the key to the success of the Warfighter's military performance.

The military celebrates the Friday before Mother’s Day every year as Military Spouse Appreciation Day. In 1984, former president Ronald Reagan initiated this event to acknowledge and honor the commitment, courage, and sacrifice of the wives and husbands of our nation’s service members. Military spouses are the backbone of their families and are key to the success of the Warfighter’s military performance. President Barack Obama reflected in his 2010 Military Spouse Appreciation Day speech, “At the heart of our Armed Forces, service members’ spouses keep our military families on track.”

The Military Family Resource Center reports these statistics about military spouses and/or families:

  • Almost 60% the active-duty force has family responsibilities of a spouse and/or children.
  • 93% of the spouses of active-duty members are female.
  • 54% of the spouses are 30 years of age or younger; 72% are under age 36.
  • 56% of active-duty spouses are employed. 14% of active-duty spouses are Armed Forces members themselves.
  • 43% of active-duty members have children; the average number of children for active-duty members who have children is two.
  • Among active-duty members who have dependents, the average number of dependents is almost 2.5.
  • More than 50% of the children of active-duty members are seven years of age or younger.

(Source: 2008 Demographics: Profile of the Military Community, published by the Military Family Resource Center.)

For more information about President Obama’s speech, see:

http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/presidential-proclamation-military-spouse-appreciation-day

Family Matters: Military Youth Risk-Taking Behavior

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In a study of military youth, risk-taking behavior was compared to national and state averages. How did they rank?

In a study of military youth, risk-taking behavior was compared to national and state averages. The researchers found that risk-taking behaviors among military youth—specifically, sexual activity and substance abuse—were much lower than national and state averages. However, there were still reports of risk-taking behaviors among military youth, so the authors caution not to misinterpret this information—even military children still need guidance. For more information on risk-taking behaviors, visit the HPRC's Mind Tactics "Performance Degraders" section.

Family Matters: Routines are key for Warfighters and families

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Routines can strengthen athletic performance—and also a family's performance.

All successful athletes have routines: bouncing the ball three times and pausing before shooting a free throw, having a warm-up routine before every game, or chanting together in a group to get pumped before a game starts. As elite athletes, Warfighters also engage in routine activities to get into a mindset for success: cleaning their weapon the exact same way every time, having a pre-combat check prior to engagement, or putting their gear on in a certain order every day. Likewise, all successful families have routines. Spending time doing fun family activities, chores, or other quality time (like mealtime) together creates stability within the family and opportunities to connect. In fact, these findings have prompted researchers to assert, “Families who play together stay together.” Research has shown that couples who spend their leisure time together are less likely to divorce or separate. For military families, being apart (for deployment or training) can make it more difficult to maintain family routines, but it makes it even more important. Research has found that it is important for children to maintain a consistent routine while a parent is deployed. Some families mark a calendar, have special bedtime routines, or write in a diary while their family member is deployed. It’s equally important that deployed spouses and/or parents develop routines that keep them connected to their families at home. All of these strategies build family strength and closeness, both on the home front and during the heightened stress of separation.

For more strategies to help build family resilience, see the Family & Relationships section of HPRC's website.

Family Matters: Military “Patient Centered Medical Home” initiative

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Patient Centered Medical Homes (PCMH) is a medical model being instituted in the military medical community that will impact how military families access and receive medical care.

Patient Centered Medical Homes (PCMH) is a medical model being instituted in the military medical community that will impact how military families access and receive medical care. In this new model, every patient will be assigned a Primary Care Manager (a physician or other medical professional) who will ensure continuity of care and services 24/7. Other benefits include having a consistent relationship with one care provider as well as team-based medical care. Patients who use PCMHs have been found to have better outcomes than those who use a traditional medical model.

PCMHs will be used by 100% of all services by 2016, and patients will be encouraged to seek all care through their Primary Care Manager (called PCMs). Additionally, each service is now using PCMHs with different names: Family Health Operations (AF), Medical Home Port (Navy), and Army Medical Home (Army).

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Family Matters: Deployment communication

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Military families have created unique ways to maintain close communication through deployments and long duty times.

Military families have created unique ways to maintain close communication through deployments and long duty times. Merolla (2010) studied military spouse communication during deployment and found that while deployed, families deal with the stress of being separated well through balancing talk of everyday things (such as routines and everyday information) with deeper more meaningful conversations. Additionally, another key finding was that though there were individual differences – with creativity among couples an asset – couples seemed to benefit from keeping deployment communication similar to nondeployment communication in both planned and spontaneous discussions (Merolla, 2010).

Source:
Merolla, A. (2010). Relational maintenance during military deployment: Perspectives of wives of deployed US Soldiers. Journal of Applied Communication Research, 38(1), 4-26.

White House initiatives to support military families

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The White House has announced new initiatives to support military families in four key areas: overall well-being, education and development of military children, career advancement opportunities for military spouses, and improved childcare.

Recently, the White House announced new initiatives to support military families in four key areas: overall well-being, education and development of military children, career advancement opportunities for military spouses, and improved availability of quality childcare. Multiple agencies have partnered to support these efforts with the following goals:

  • Focus on suicide trends to offer targeted preventive training and counseling to meet the mental health needs of military families;
  • Offer child care resources;
  • Combat homelessness;
  • Expand communication across rural communities;
  • Expand career opportunities for military spouses;
  • Expand access to financial aid and needs of military students; and
  • Expand facilities to help military families recover, integrate, and support their youth during and after deployment cycles.
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    Balance supporting others and taking care of yourself

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    Finding a balance between taking care of others and taking care of yourself is important.

    Living in high-stress environments while deployed often affects life when Warfighters return home. Families become an important source of reintegration support. However, finding the balance between taking care of others and taking care of yourself is important. The Real Warriors program suggests that time should be set aside for each individual to reset – which could include hanging out with friends and family outside the home, relaxing with a book, through an activity like yoga, or helping out in the community.

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