Blog Archive

2014

2013

2012

2011

2010

Alerts

RegenESlim Appetite Control Capsules voluntarily recalled due to the presence of DMAA.

FDA warns consumers about caffeine powder. 

FDA advises consumers to stop using any supplement products labeled as OxyElite Pro or VERSA-1. Please see the following advisories: FDA -10/08/13, FDA - 10/11/13 and CDC - 10/08/13.

OPSS Hompage Button tall

Natural Medicines Homepage Button tall

Announcements

New article on reporting side effects of supplements
Just published in The New England Journal of Medicine: A recent article brings up dietary supplement issues you need to be aware of and discusses how dietary supplement side effects could be monitored better. A PDF of the April 3rd article is available free online.

3rd International Congress on Soldiers’ Physical Performance
August 18-21, 2014
The ICSPP delivers innovative scientific programming on soldiers’ physical performance with experts from around the world.

DMAA list updated for April 2014

Fueling Performance Photo Campaign
Share photos of how you fuel your performance and be featured on our Facebook page!

Dietary supplement module
Earn continuing education credits (if eligible) for this two-hour online module.

Operation LiveWell

Performance Triad

You are here: Home / HPRC Blog

Filed under: Military performance

HPRC in the News - Older active duty military personnel and readiness

HPRC Fitness Arena:
The Human Performance Resource Center (HPRC) was quoted in a recent article in the Courier-Journal (Louisville, KY).


The Human Performance Resource Center (HPRC) was quoted in a recent article in the Courier-Journal (Louisville, KY).

The article discusses the impact of older active duty military personnel and military readiness.

Military Spouse Appreciation Day

HPRC Fitness Arena:
Military spouses are adaptable, committed, courageous, the backbone of the military family and the key to the success of the Warfighter's military performance.

The military celebrates the Friday before Mother’s Day every year as Military Spouse Appreciation Day. In 1984, former president Ronald Reagan initiated this event to acknowledge and honor the commitment, courage, and sacrifice of the wives and husbands of our nation’s service members. Military spouses are the backbone of their families and are key to the success of the Warfighter’s military performance. President Barack Obama reflected in his 2010 Military Spouse Appreciation Day speech, “At the heart of our Armed Forces, service members’ spouses keep our military families on track.”

The Military Family Resource Center reports these statistics about military spouses and/or families:

  • Almost 60% the active-duty force has family responsibilities of a spouse and/or children.
  • 93% of the spouses of active-duty members are female.
  • 54% of the spouses are 30 years of age or younger; 72% are under age 36.
  • 56% of active-duty spouses are employed. 14% of active-duty spouses are Armed Forces members themselves.
  • 43% of active-duty members have children; the average number of children for active-duty members who have children is two.
  • Among active-duty members who have dependents, the average number of dependents is almost 2.5.
  • More than 50% of the children of active-duty members are seven years of age or younger.

(Source: 2008 Demographics: Profile of the Military Community, published by the Military Family Resource Center.)

For more information about President Obama’s speech, see:

http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/presidential-proclamation-military-spouse-appreciation-day

Finan's Blog: Tips for training

HPRC Fitness Arena:
Tips on preparing for Physical Fitness Training – from an OCS candidate

Saturday May 8, 2010: This was the first day in my new PFT/OCS[1] workout journal.

Pull-ups: 8

Three-mile run: never finished

Sit-ups/2 min – 59

"Tough times don't last. Tough people do." – Gregory Peck.

This is the quote that I think about every day while I’m training for my upcoming ten weeks at OCS this summer. I have never been OUT of shape, but lately I have wondering how IN shape I truly am. So it got me thinking of what is the best way to train for this “hell” that I have heard of. I started with the traditional “practice makes perfect” strategy and started running every day, doing two minutes of sit-ups, and trying to do 20 correct pull-ups without failing. I have to admit it was very hard, and I was not seeing results as fast as I had expected. I am a martial arts instructor and can roll with a student for 20 minutes without gasping for air, but after 1.5 miles of jogging, I was contemplating sleeping on the sidewalk of the street! Now, everyone knows that a basic principle of getting healthy is discipline, but it starts with disciplining your mind before your body. I have a couple Marine buddies who have gone through OCS, and they gave me a whole bunch of advice. I combined most of the things I wrote down from then and have found some helpful tips for training for OCS:

  1. Switch up your training regimen—so that you do not overwork certain muscles in your body. (See the HPRC website for ideas from various military fitness programs.)
  2. Breakfast is ESSENTIAL!—It gives you the energy to start out your day with a bang.
  3. Know your limits—do not train to the point of pain. When you’ve had enough, call it quits and start again tomorrow.
  4. Consistency is the goal—train most days unless you are sick—or incredibly sore from the 1st day, like I was. Every day does not have to be intense. [HPRC specialist’s note: At least one or two days of rest each week is advisable when ramping up to this activity level. The goal is to get to OCS strong, fit, and ready, not broken before you get there.]
  5. Don’t give up—I imagine that the real thing will be 10x harder then what I am doing to prepare. It helps give me the sense that things are easy now.

Thanks to tips like these—and consistency—I managed to get a 297/300 on my PFT test in December, which allowed me to qualify for OCS training. My score was based off these results:

Pull-ups: 20

Three-mile run: 18:09

Sit-ups/2 min: 100

Nine seconds shorter on my run and I would have had a perfect score of 300! Yes, I was extremely happy about this—but also nervous because now I had one year to graduate, and I had to stay in this kind of shape?!

Saturday March 5, 2011:

Pull-ups: 24

Three-mile-run: 17:56

Sit-ups: 100

Basically, for all those people out there who are trying to get in shape for boot camp, OCS, or even just a PFT test, take these tips into consideration. They have done amazing things for me, and I hope they work for you. Now I have more confidence in myself, more energy, and a better overlook on all this. Start preparing your mind today for what your body will be going through tomorrow.



[1] Physical Fitness Training (PFT)/Officer Candidate School (OCS)

First Lady takes health initiative to Army base

HPRC Fitness Arena:
First lady Michelle Obama called on parents, schools, workplaces and the military to combat America's obesity epidemic in a recent visit to Fort Jackson.

First lady Michelle Obama called on parents, schools, workplaces and the military to combat America's obesity epidemic in a visit to Fort Jackson this past Thursday. As America's waistline has grown, finding young people fit enough to serve in the military has become a problem, U.S. Army officials told Obama during her three-hour visit.

Ms. Obama is promoting the "Let's Move!" program to combat childhood obesity. And she met with Army personnel, from privates to a three-star general, to find out how the military is dealing with the problem and how solutions might be transferred to the general population.

Click below to access the article

New battlefield training course for airmen

HPRC Fitness Arena:
A new five-day course for future tactical air control party airmen gets them ready for critical war zone jobs.





A new five-day course for future tactical air control party airmen gets them ready for the next step: technical training at Hurlburt Field, Fla. It is just one of the ways the Air Force is trying to improve how it prepares and trains airmen for critical battlefield jobs.

Click below to access the article.

Course introduces airmen to the battlefield

Supplements may boost energy but strain troops' hearts

HPRC Fitness Arena:
Military doctors are worried that certain energy supplements could lead to heart problems in U.S. troops.

According to a recent  article in Stars and Stripes, Military doctors are worried that certain energy supplements could lead to heart problems in U.S. troops, particularly those serving in combat zones.

Click below to access the article.

Supplements may boost energy but strain troops' hearts

Studies look to see if mouthpiece boosts athletic performance

According to researchers at The Citadel, wearing a small plastic mouthpiece during exercise could boost athletic performance.




mouthguard_shutterstock.jpgPhoto: Shutterstock.com

According to researchers at The Citadel, wearing a small plastic mouthpiece during exercise could boost athletic performance. The military college has been studying the mouthpiece's affect on different aspects of performance since 2004.

They want to know not only if it works, but how it works. In an article from The Post and Courier (Charleston, SC), one of the aspects researchers are studying is the mouthpiece's affect on levels of the hormone cortisol - which is associated with stress. Cortisol increases when people exercise.

When a person wears the mouthpiece, cortisol levels seem to drop back to a normal level more quickly. The studies currently under way are looking at how the mouthpiece affects performance, resistance-training, flexibility and pistol shooting accuracy.

Click below to access the article.

Citadel puts research where mouth is

Perfect pushups: Which service branch offers the best methods?

HPRC Fitness Arena:
Navy Times has an article that examines what the definition of a “military push-up” means to a soldier, sailor, airman and Marine.

pushup.jpgPhoto: Department of Defense

Navy Times has an article that examines what the definition of a “military push-up”  means to a soldier, sailor, airman and Marine.

Click on the link below to access the article.

Performing the perfect push-up

Airman provides some tried and true workout methods

HPRC Fitness Arena:
NBCwashington.com (Washington, D.C.) has an article on how one U.S. Air Force airman stays healthy and in shape for Air Force-related missions.

 

Photo: Shutterstock.commanexercisingbarbells_shutterstock.jpg

NBCwashington.com (Washington, D.C.) has an article on how one U.S. Air Force airman stays healthy and in shape for Air Force-related missions.

According to the article, Airman 1st Class Angelo Beatois is an advocate of high-intensity workouts, including sit-ups, push-ups and pull-ups, combined with sprints and running.  He designed his own personal workout from the variations of exercises he learned when stationed from base to base.

Click on link below to access the article.

Tried and True Workout Methods

Journal entry icon

Army recruit goes from couch potato to Warfighter

HPRC Fitness Arena:
A former couch potato turned disciplined army recruit gets into fighting shape.

Runner's legs

The October 14 edition of the Recordnet.com (Stockton, CA) has an interesting piece showing how one army recruit (as well as a self-described former couch potato ) was able to loose 50 pounds in order to get ready to report for duty at Fort Benning, GA.

Read the full article here.

RSS Feed