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Face fears and imagine success

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When fear of failure takes hold, explore it—and conquer it.

Fear of failure can prevent you from performing your best in many situations including combat, work, relationships, and daily life. Worry can take a bigger hold when you push it aside. For instance, while preparing to give a presentation and thinking, “I can’t be nervous,” you might actually feel more nervous!

As you face your fears, understand that fearing something will happen doesn't mean that it will happen. Ask yourself these kinds of questions:

  • Why do I think I can’t be nervous? If I’m nervous, I’ll give a horrible talk.
  • So if I’m nervous, I’m guaranteed to give a horrible talk? No, I’ve given good talks while nervous before.
  • If nervousness leads to giving an awful talk, what’s the worst thing about that? I’d be embarrassed and people would walk away without having learned important material.
  • What’s worse—embarrassment or people walking away without learning? I’d survive the embarrassment. People need to learn this stuff.
  • Is this their last opportunity to learn? No, I’d take more steps to make sure they got it, despite an initially awful talk.

Once you fully consider the failure scenarios, spend more time imagining a positive outcome and accomplishing smaller goals that lead to success.

Ways to quiet your mind

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Figure out your preferred approach to quieting your mind so that you’re ready to take on the next challenge!

You might have noticed that you can “turn off” your busy brain by watching TV, but did you know there are other techniques that could help quiet your mind? You can download several MP3 audio files in HPRC’s Mind-Body Apps, Tools, and Videos.

Remember it's okay if your busy brain turns on. But just as easily as racing thoughts creep in, let them creep out—while gently guiding your attention to something neutral such as your breath, or something important such as the task at hand. Whether it’s watching TV or using a mind-body technique, find ways to quiet your mind and be more focused when it matters.

Practicing optimism

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Optimism brings with it a number of health benefits. The good news is you can learn to increase your level of optimism and start enjoying these benefits today.

There are exercises you can do to improve your mindset and your optimism, the belief that things will go well for you in a given situation. This is important because optimism is associated with health benefits such as:

  • less risk of death from heart attack;
  • lower risk of depression following events such as the death or illness of someone close; and
  • better personal relationships.

Military training for contingency planning can help you identify what can or did go wrong as part of your important risk-assessment skills. However, when you transfer these strategies to noncombat life you may find focusing on potential problems hurts more than it helps. Balancing optimism and contingency planning can be difficult, but the good news is that you can learn optimism too. Here are some strategies to get you started.

Don’t hold yourself back

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Filed under: Mind, Mind tactics
If you give 100% effort and fail, you could blame other factors, but then you’d miss out on a great learning opportunity.

Don’t make things harder for yourself by making excuses or creating excuses in advance. When you set a goal and the stakes feel high, it can be easy to make excuses when you fail in order to avoid negative feelings such as regret, shame, or guilt. Without thinking about why you do it, you may sometimes make tasks harder than they need to be so that ready-made excuses “protect” you from feeling bad. The downside is that you miss opportunities to learn from your experiences and test your “true” skills. This is called “self-handicapping.” Learn how to set yourself up for success instead. Read more here.

Get into the Zone

HPRC Fitness Arena: Mind Tactics, Total Force Fitness
In training, sports, or life, you’ve likely experienced times when “things just click”—when you’re in “the Zone” or experiencing “flow.” Learn more.

The ultimate performance mind state is often referred to as “the Zone,” which scientists refer to as “flow.” It isn’t something you can decide to suddenly experience, but you can remove obstacles and learn mental skills that help pave the way. This experience of being completely immersed in an activity involves:

  • Clear goals and immediate understanding of whether actions are helping or hurting your progress towards goals.
  • Being intense and focused on the present moment.
  • A merging together—in the moment—of what you do and what you are aware of.
  • Not feeling self-consciousness or anxious.
  • Time slowing down or speeding up.
  • Your attention focused on exactly where you need it to be.
  • Feeling challenged yet taking opportunities even when they’re a slight stretch.
  • Feeling in control and prepared to face whatever happens next.

You can experience the Zone in many ways, whether you’re engaged in combat, playing competitive sports, or raising children. It can’t be forced, but you can set the stage for it by doing many hours of deliberate practice and by honing good mental skills.

Mental imagery works!

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Mental imagery isn’t a magic trick. It’s an essential training tool you can learn. Try these tips on how to make mind rehearsals productive for you.

You can learn to use the same mental imagery skills that elite athletes use to achieve peak performance. Mental imagery is the practice of seeing (and feeling) in your mind’s eye how you want to perform a skill, as if you were actually doing it. It’s a popular sport psychology technique that service members can take advantage of. You can enhance your usual training to help maintain—or even surpass—your current skill level, even when you’re sidelined.

Some of the benefits of mental imagery include:

  • Better decision-making
  • Fewer errors
  • Improved attention
  • Increased confidence
  • Reduced stress and anxiety

You can create imagery in your mind for just about any task, such as improving your running time or marksmanship. Good mental imagery uses all of the senses, but it often helps to listen to a scripted audio recording. Use HPRC’s Building an Imagery Script worksheet to guide you through the steps of creating your own imagery script.

Watching others can also help. In fact, being a spectator can boost learning even more than mental imagery by itself because you’re viewing what you’d like to accomplish rather than conjuring up images with your own mind. Both methods of learning are effective. Observing can be in person or by video, but you can also combine video/imagery approaches and potentially get even more bang for your buck.

With any of these approaches, it’s important to “feel” yourself executing the skill, even though you might be sitting or lying down. Of course, you don’t have to be sitting still to use mental imagery. Try using it in the setting where you’ll actually perform the skill. You can even incorporate it into existing training protocols.

Are you tough enough…mentally?

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Are you mentally tough? See if you’ve got the 4 Cs. Develop these traits and maintain them.

Mental toughness is a psychological edge that some are born with and others develop. It’s a mixture of traits that are important for all who want to overcome adversity and be successful. These traits include a strong belief in yourself and an unshakable faith that you control your own destiny. It allows you to consistently cope with training and lifestyle demands better than those who don’t have it.

If you have these 4 Cs, you’re mentally tough:

  • Control: You feel in control of your emotions and are influential with the people in your life. 
  • Commitment: You embrace difficulty rather than running from it.
  • Challenge: You believe that life is full of opportunities, not threats.
  • Confidence: You know you have what it takes to be successful.

How to get it? You can gain mental toughness through a long-term process of developing mental skills.  Leaders can specifically promote mental toughness by creating a learning environment centered on the mastery of the 4 Cs. They also can help by generally supporting and encouraging service members to maintain positive relationships. Over the long haul, to maintain and improve your mental toughness, you need to constantly hone your mental skills. And finally, you need a self-driven, insatiable desire to succeed.

The best routines aren’t

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Routines help athletes and service members achieve their best, but rigid routines can get in the way. Flexibility and adaptation are keys to success.

Routines often can help your performance, but you need to be flexible too. Some of the world’s best athletes have scripted routines that begin with what time they wake up. Top performers find that routines can help shift them from stressful anticipation of how things are going to turn out to focus instead on what’s most important in that moment. In other words, routines can help you reduce anxiety.

But while rigid routines can be useful when the events are predictable, overly rigid routines can morph a helpful tool into a superstitious or obsessive ritual. The best athletes regard flexibility and adaptation as crucial to their own, often finely honed, routines. With service members for whom crises are part of the job, the best teams are able to go “off-script” when needed in order to work together most effectively.

For more information on mental aspects of performance, visit HPRC’s Mind Tactics domain.

Trapped by your thoughts?

The way we think often impacts what we do. This is particularly true in relationships.

How we interpret experiences has a big impact on how we react to them. Your personal relationships are especially prone to “thinking traps” that can lead you to draw false conclusions. For example, let’s say you’ve been married for some time now. But recently you find yourself thinking your partner doesn’t love you any more because she or he no longer says so.

One way to address this kind of thinking trap is to ask yourself—or have a friend ask you—questions that make you think about the reasoning or evidence behind what you’re thinking:

  • What specifically makes you think your spouse doesn’t love you any more?
  • What did he or she do in the past that made you feel loved?
  • Are there any other possible explanations that might explain your partner’s behavior, such as job stress, an ailing parent, children acting out, or recent return from deployment?
  • When you think back to the beginning of your relationship, how could you tell he or she loved you? Was it something said? Or done?
  • Has your behavior toward your spouse changed recently?

Questions such as these can help you gain perspective. Once you’ve gone through this self-questioning process, it’s possible you’ll interpret your partner’s behavior in a different way. Maybe you were just caught up in a thinking trap.

Can meditation boost your immune system?

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Meditation may improve your immune system, help you feel better, and help you use fewer sick days.

Not only can meditation help with stress, it may even boost your immune system and reduce inflammation. In fact, research has found that people who have been in a structured mindfulness program actually had fewer sick days compared to those who didn’t meditate. Even when you’re sick, meditation may actually help you feel better (and happier) in spite of lingering symptoms. And although meditation doesn’t seem to help the elderly to the same extent, it can still help some. 

Not sure how to get started or how to advance your practice? Check out HPRC’s A mindfulness meditation primer” and the MP3 audio files linked there.

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