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Take the day off and celebrate the Navy’s birthday!

HPRC Fitness Arena: Total Force Fitness
Filed under: Navy, Service branches
Columbus Day this year falls on the 239th birthday of the U.S. Navy. Was Columbus really in the Navy?

As you probably know, Columbus had ships. And the Navy has ships. And both had something to do with the birth of the United States of America. After that, any connection is a bit of a stretch. After five weeks at sea, Columbus made first landfall in the Americas on 12 October 1492 on an island in the Bahamas. In 1937, Columbus Day became a federal holiday, and since 1970 it has been on the second Monday in October.

The Second Continental Congress—the group that governed during the American Revolution and eventually passed our Declaration of Independence in 1776—created the Continental Navy in 1775. It began by authorizing two armed ships and crews to destroy munitions ships that provided supplies for the British Army in America. During the war, the Navy deployed as many as 20 warships at a time. Following the war, Congress sold the remaining warships and released their crews.

However, the new Constitution of the United States included instructions “to provide and maintain a navy,” so in 1794 the War Department oversaw the construction and manning of six new ships, and on 30 April 1798 Congress established the Department of the Navy. The United States Navy has existed continuously since then. Despite this second “birthday,” in 1972 the Chief of Naval Operations established 13 October as the officially recognized anniversary. For interesting facts, articles, activities, and more, check out the official “Navy Birthday” web page. And find something fun to do! After all, thanks to Columbus, this year it’s a holiday!

New year, new coveralls for the Navy

HPRC Fitness Arena: Environment, Total Force Fitness
Filed under: Navy, Safety, Uniforms
By early 2014, more sailors will be better protected against fires with new flame-resistant coveralls.

Before 2013 comes to a close, the Navy will begin distributing Flame Resistant Variant (FRV) coveralls to all Sailors assigned to surface ships and aircraft carriers. Previously, only Sailors working in engineering departments, on flight decks, and in other high-risk areas were issued flame-resistant clothing. However, a recent review found that the highest risk of severe injury from flames was from major fires or explosions, which puts any Sailor at risk. Tests revealed that the Navy Working Uniforms (NWU) type I, made of a polyester cotton blend, are susceptible to melting in a fire, which could cause even greater injury to the wearer. The new FRV coveralls are 100% cotton with a fire-resistant coating, which is self-extinguishing. The Navy plans to improve and standardize all coveralls over the next couple years by combining the protective effects of flame resistance, arc-flash protection, and low-lint specifications into one safe and effective uniform.

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