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Alerts

RegenESlim Appetite Control Capsules voluntarily recalled due to the presence of DMAA.

FDA warns consumers about caffeine powder. 

FDA advises consumers to stop using any supplement products labeled as OxyElite Pro or VERSA-1. Please see the following advisories: FDA -10/08/13, FDA - 10/11/13 and CDC - 10/08/13.

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Announcements

New article on reporting side effects of supplements
Just published in The New England Journal of Medicine: A recent article brings up dietary supplement issues you need to be aware of and discusses how dietary supplement side effects could be monitored better. A PDF of the April 3rd article is available free online.

3rd International Congress on Soldiers’ Physical Performance
August 18-21, 2014
The ICSPP delivers innovative scientific programming on soldiers’ physical performance with experts from around the world.

DMAA list updated for April 2014

Fueling Performance Photo Campaign
Share photos of how you fuel your performance and be featured on our Facebook page!

Dietary supplement module
Earn continuing education credits (if eligible) for this two-hour online module.

Operation LiveWell

Performance Triad

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Filed under: Nutrition

Can eating a big breakfast help you lose weight?

HPRC Fitness Arena:
A recent German study provides evidence to challenge the common belief that eating a big breakfast can help you lose weight.

You may have heard time and time again that breakfast is the most important meal of the day and that eating a big breakfast could help you lose weight. One explanation for this claim is that starting the day with a big breakfast prevents food cravings and induces weight loss. Is this true? And is there scientific evidence to support this claim?

Some scientific findings suggest that consuming an energy-rich breakfast causes a person to eat less during the rest of the day. Other findings suggest that increasing the size of breakfast is linked to overall greater food intake. A WebMD article examined this conflicting evidence in light of a recent study conducted by a group of German scientists at the Else-Kroner-Fresenius Center of Nutritional Medicine, Technical University of Munich. Naturally, a study has to be well designed and executed in order for the results to hold up to scrutiny by the scientific community. In this case, which involved a large group of participants, several measures were introduced to encourage accurate record keeping and sound statistics to analyze the results.

Generally speaking, the study suggests that individuals who consume bigger breakfasts in hopes of losing weight may actually end up consuming more calories than anticipated, as they are likely to eat the same amounts of food during lunch and dinner that they would following a small breakfast. This particular finding is worth sharing because it creates awareness of this behavior and may encourage people to consciously watch what they eat for lunch and dinner if they do have a big breakfast or, alternatively, reduce the size of their breakfast. This could be a key for people in their efforts to maintain or lose weight.

All the same, we wish to remind readers that there is no magic formula when it comes to losing weight. Well, maybe there is…

Higher Caloric Expenditure + Lower Caloric Intake = Weight Loss

This is a good general formula to keep in mind in your efforts to lose or maintain your weight. So for instance, while being physically active increases your caloric expenditure, reducing a high-fat diet lowers your caloric intake. And in this instance, refraining from eating a bigger breakfast than usual could contribute to reducing your caloric intake for the day.

In short, we encourage you to eat regular, healthy meals. However, if you decide to eat a bigger-than-usual breakfast, balance it out by eating less during the rest of the day. We hope that the results of this study help you make informed decisions about the number of calories you consume for breakfast.

The calorie label initiative: How many calories are in your beverage?

HPRC Fitness Arena:
Following a lead from First Lady Michelle Obama to combat obesity, several beverage-industry companies are voluntarily putting the total calories on the front labels of their non-alcoholic beverages.

Following a lead from First Lady Michelle Obama to combat obesity, several beverage-industry companies are voluntarily putting the total calories on the front labels of their non-alcoholic beverages. The American Beverage Association’s 2010 “Clear on Calories” initiative directed that beverage containers of 20 ounces or less carry total calories, while larger containers identify calories per 12 ounces, with full implementation by 2012. For more information, read a news release about this new initiative.

March: National Nutrition Month

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A colorful approach to healthy eating is presented by the American Dietetic Association.

March is National Nutrition Month, and this year’s theme is “Eat Right with Color,” which promotes eating lots of fruits and vegetables, as well as whole grains, lean proteins, and dairy foods. For recipes, snack ideas, games, and overall resources supporting National Nutrition Month, go to the American Dietetic Association’s page on nutrition education resources.

FDA Alert: Recall of E. coli contaminated hazelnuts

HPRC Fitness Arena:
The FDA posted an alert on an E. coli outbreak that has caused at least 7 illnesses in Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin that involves hazelnuts likely grown and harvested in Oregon.

The FDA posted an alert on an E. coli outbreak that involves hazelnuts by DeFranco & Sons, which has voluntarily recalled bulk and bagged in-shell hazelnuts and mixed-nut products. The recalled products have been linked to seven cases of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin and may cause serious illness.

Click on link below to access the article.

FDA: E. coli O157:H7 cases linked to hazelnuts

Are military mess halls hurting our Armed Forces?

HPRC Fitness Arena:
Slate.com has an opinion piece on the Army's "Soldier Athlete" food program that was initiated last fall.

Slate.com has an opinion piece on the Army's "Soldier Athlete" food program that was initiated last fall in cafeterias at Fort Jackson in South Carolina; Fort Sill in Oklahoma; Fort Knox in Kentucky; Fort Benning in Georgia, and Fort Leonard Wood, in Missouri—the five bases where the Army's 10-week basic training sessions take place.

Click below to access the article:

Unhealthy military mess halls are hurting our armed forces.

Consume less salt

HPRC Fitness Arena:
The daily recommended intake has gone down.

The American Heart Association recently reduced the recommended daily intake of sodium, or salt, to 1500 mg or less per day. High salt intake is associated with increased risk of blood pressure, heart attack, stroke, and kidney disease and many Americans are at risk. Read about daily recommendations and the benefits of consuming less salt by clicking here.

2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans

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The online version of the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans is now available.

The online version of the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans is now available. The 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans establishes the scientific and policy basis for all Federal nutrition programs, including research, education, nutrition assistance, labeling, and nutrition promotion.

Click on the link below to access the guideline. The guidelines are located on the HPRC Nutrition page and can be found under "The Basics" tab.

2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans

Choose a variety of foods for adequate calcium intake

HPRC Fitness Arena:
Your body needs calcium for optimal bone health and a number of other functions essential to daily life.

Your body needs calcium for optimal bone health and a number of other functions essential to daily life. Good food sources include: fat-free or low-fat milk, cheese, and yogurt; leafy greens such as spinach and kale; and broccoli, and pinto and red beans.  Many other foods such as high fiber cereal, soy beverages, and orange juice are fortified with added calcium.  Adding these foods to your diet will improve not only your calcium intake, but many other nutrients as well!

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Prevent food poisoning

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Foodborne illness, commonly known as food poisoning, can make you feel as if you have the flu! Some tips will help you stay safe.

Foodborne illness, commonly known as food poisoning, can make you feel as if you have the flu! Symptoms often include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, or fever. It’s caused by consuming foods or beverages contaminated with bacteria, parasites, or viruses. To prevent, wash your hands and surfaces; cook foods to proper temperatures; and refrigerate cooked foods promptly. For more helpful tips, click here.

First Lady visit to Fort Jackson will highlight the impact of obesity and decreased physical activity on military recruitment

HPRC Fitness Arena:
First lady Michelle Obama will visit South Carolina this week to highlight the impact of childhood obesity and decreased physical activity on military recruitment.



First Lady Michelle Obama will visit South Carolina on January 27 for the first time since moving into the White House when she comes to Fort Jackson to highlight the impact of childhood obesity and decreased physical activity on military recruitment. Ms. Obama will spend a good chunk of the day at Fort Jackson, the Army’s largest training base, where she will discuss the “Let’s Move” campaign she launched two years ago with the aim of eliminating childhood obesity in a generation.

Click below to access the article.

Michelle Obama to visit Fort Jackson

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