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Alerts

FDA advises consumers to stop using any supplement products labeled as OxyElite Pro or VERSA-1. Please see the following advisories: FDA -10/08/13, FDA - 10/11/13 and CDC - 10/08/13.

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Announcements

New article on reporting side effects of supplements
Just published in The New England Journal of Medicine: A recent article brings up dietary supplement issues you need to be aware of and discusses how dietary supplement side effects could be monitored better. A PDF of the April 3rd article is available free online.

3rd International Congress on Soldiers’ Physical Performance
August 18-21, 2014
The ICSPP delivers innovative scientific programming on soldiers’ physical performance with experts from around the world.

DMAA list updated for April 2014

Fueling Performance Photo Campaign
Share photos of how you fuel your performance and be featured on our Facebook page!

Dietary supplement module
Earn continuing education credits (if eligible) for this two-hour online module.

Operation LiveWell

Performance Triad

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Filed under: Nutrition

Women’s health and dietary supplements

Military Health System has designated October as Women’s Health Awareness month. Find out how dietary supplements play a role in a women’s life.

About half of all military personnel use some dietary supplements, and military women most commonly use weight-loss supplements. But is there a place for dietary supplements in enhancing women’s health? Dietary supplements, by definition, are intended to “supplement the diet” and can contain a dietary ingredient such as a vitamin, mineral, herb or other botanical, amino acid, or combinations of these and/or other substances or constituents intended to be consumed by mouth.

Active women may require more nutrients, but vitamin and mineral needs normally can be met by eating a variety of nutrient-rich foods. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans focus largely on the recommendation that nutrient-dense foods and beverages—such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains, low-fat dairy products, lean meats and poultry, eggs, nuts and seeds—can provide all the nutrients needed by most everyone. These recommendations are based on research that shows a varied, healthy diet lowers the risk of most diseases.

Some dietary supplements have been found to be beneficial for women’s health, such as folic acid, iron, and calcium. Folic acid, a B vitamin involved in the production of new cells in the body, has been shown to help prevent birth defects. Women who are thinking of becoming pregnant or are pregnant should take a supplement that includes 400 micrograms of folic acid per day. Fortified foods such as green, leafy vegetables, enriched whole grain breads, flour, pasta, rice, and most ready-to-eat cereals also contain folic acid. Adolescent girls, women of childbearing age, and especially pregnant women also need more iron, which is a mineral involved in the transport of oxygen in the body. Women in these groups should choose iron-rich foods, particularly red meat, fish, and poultry, as well as iron-fortified foods. When iron levels are low, symptoms may include feeling extra tired and weak, along with a decrease in immune function. A healthcare provider or dietitian can determine the need for supplementation if diet alone cannot maintain iron levels or for those who have iron-deficiency anemia. Calcium is an important mineral that helps maintain strong bones, healthy teeth, and proper functioning of the heart, muscles, and nerves. All women should strive to get their calcium from foods such as low-fat milk, yogurt, cheese, dark-green, leafy vegetables, and foods such as orange juice and soy milk that have been calcium-fortified. Those who may need more should discuss calcium supplement options with a dietitian, since there are many forms available and it is important to determine how much and which kind is suitable for your particular needs.

Some dietary supplement products marketed for weight loss are targeted toward women. Do they work? According to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), some weight-loss supplements contain hidden prescription drug ingredients. For additional information, see Operation Supplement Safety’s (OPSS) “Are there any safe supplements to help me lose weight?” Furthermore, women looking to enhance their performance may turn to dietary supplement products. OPSS has additional resources for competitive athletes to search for particular products that are certified, as well as helpful red flags on what to avoid.

Some women’s nutrient needs differ from those of men, and they can vary over the course of a lifetime. From adolescent girls, to women of childbearing age, to women over 50, these needs change based on the demands of the physiological changes that occur in the body.  One thing is certain: A variety of nutritious food is really the spice of life and should be the basis for fueling all of life’s stages.

Operation Live Well

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
Operation Live Well, a recently launched campaign from the Department of Defense, seeks to promote and sustain the health of service members, families, veterans, and retirees.

Are you looking for ways to promote your health or the health of your family? Operation Live Well, a DoD initiative, provides a wealth of information each month on a targeted topic. September is National Cholesterol Education Month and National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month. High blood cholesterol puts you at risk for heart disease, the number one killer of men and women in the United States. Encouraging family physical fitness can instill a lifetime of healthy habits and decrease risks for problems such as heart disease, diabetes, and certain types of cancer. Check back often to see new topics and explore methods to improve and sustain your well-being!

Consumer Reports on 10 hazards of dietary supplements

The Consumer Reports website recently posted an article outlining the potential dangers of dietary supplement products.

People take dietary supplements for lots of different reasons, and some may take them because they believe they are “natural” and therefore safe. A new article from ConsumerReports.org lists 10 hazards of taking dietary supplement products, pointing out that supplements are not risk-free.

Operation Supplement Safety (OPSS) is about to launch this summer and will answer many of your questions about Dietary Supplements. Watch for HPRC’s announcement coming soon.

Coconut water: What’s all the hype?

Coconut water may be a natural alternative for rehydration, but you may need additional sodium after strenuous exercise.

Coconut water, a potassium-rich liquid found in young green coconuts, has become a popular hydrating alternate for some active individuals. Some active individuals choose coconut drinks over other sports beverages because it is natural and contains electrolytes and minerals such as sodium, chloride, glucose, and potassium. Although natural coconut water is a fine option for active individuals to stay hydrated, the sodium content of coconut water is low, so some scientists argue that individuals who participate in vigorous exercise should consider sports drinks, which have been formulated to replenish sodium lost during extended and/or vigorous physical activity. If you exercise vigorously for more than an hour, the ACSM recommends fluids or salty snacks that contain a bit more sodium (20-50 mEq/L or ~460-1,150 mg/L) to help you replenish sodium lost during strenuous exercise.

Operation Supplement Safety (OPSS) is about to launch this summer and will answer many of your questions about Dietary Supplements. Watch for HPRC’s announcement coming soon.

Food safety update: E. coli testing in beef

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
Six additional strains of E. coli are now being testing in beef trimmings to prevent more foodborne illnesses.

The United States Department of Agriculture has begun testing six additional strains of E. coli in beef that have been responsible for severe human illness. In this effort to safeguard the U.S. food supply, the new testing will help ensure that all beef sold in the U.S. will be free of these pathogens. For additional information, including the specific strains of E. coli, please read the USDA News Release.

10 tips for healthy eating

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
MyPlate celebrates its one-year anniversary with healthy eating resources for consumers and health professionals.

The first anniversary of the MyPlate food icon is being celebrated during the month of June, hoping to remind consumers to make healthy food choices. Users can download these one-page printable sheets, each with 10 tips to help get started with and maintain a healthy diet. To access these tips, go to this page of MyPlate, and then post them on your refrigerator or locker.

Know your cholesterol numbers

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
Do you know what your HDL and LDL numbers are?

Good cholesterol, or high-density lipoprotein (HDL), helps prevent fat and cholesterol from clogging your arteries. A higher HDL number (> 60 mg/dl of blood) is better. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is considered bad cholesterol. It carries cholesterol to your arteries and can cause them to become blocked. A lower LDL number (< 100 mg/dl) is better. High-LDL or low-HDL cholesterol levels are major risk factors for heart disease and stroke. Visit this American Hearth Association web page for more information.

5-2-1-0—Healthy behaviors for children and families

Let’s Go! has 5-2-1-0 recommendations to help optimize your child’s health.

An interesting program for optimizing children’s health focuses on four specific behaviors that parents and children can use for health and wellness: Let’s Go!’s "5-2-1-0".

5—Eat at least five fruits and vegetables today – more is better!

2—Cut screen time down to two hours or less a day (no screen time for under age of two).

1—Participate in at least one hour of moderate to vigorous physical activity every day.

0—Zero sugar-sweetened sodas, sports drinks, and fruit drinks. Instead drink water and three or four servings a day of fat-free or one-percent milk.

For ideas about how to incorporate fruits and vegetables into daily meals, visit the MyPlate.gov KidsHealth website.

More for National Nutrition Month

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics offers special resources for National Nutrition Month, including healthy recipes.

National Nutrition Month is still going strong, bringing lots of healthy eating information to the attention of Americans. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics is weighing in with their “Get Your Plate in Shape” campaign, which focuses on getting the right nutrition without too many calories. Their Eat Right website page offers snack ideas, recipes, weight management tips, and exercise nutrition advice.

March is National Nutrition Month

The FDA is using National Nutrition Month to remind Americans they can use the Nutrition Facts labels on food and drinks to make healthier choices.

The goal of National Nutrition Month is to remind Americans to eat healthy and choose foods with good nutrition. The FDA’s theme for 2012 is “Remember to Use the Nutrition Facts Label.” One tool you can use to help make good food choices is the Nutrition Facts label that appears on all packaged foods and beverages. To learn how to read labels, visit the FDA’s web page “Nutrition Facts Label Programs and Materials.”

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