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Filed under: OPSS

The problem with picamilon

Why is picamilon illegal in dietary supplement products?

Picamilon goes by many names, such as pikatropin and nicotinyl-gamma-aminobutric acid, but one thing it can’t be called is a dietary ingredient. In 2015, the Food and Drug Administration declared that picamilon is not a legal ingredient in dietary supplements and sent warning letters to 5 companies whose dietary supplement products contained picamilon. So why is it illegal? Find out in the Operation Supplement Safety (OPSS) FAQ about picamilon.

If you want to learn more about other questionable ingredients, explore the OPSS FAQs about dietary supplement ingredients

Is your supplement adulterated or misbranded?

Filed under: FDA, OPSS, Supplements
Some dietary supplement products contain ingredients that just shouldn’t be there. Here’s what to look out for.

In recent years, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has taken action against dietary supplement companies for selling products with ingredients that put them in a category of being “adulterated” or “misbranded.” Examples of these ingredients include Acacia rigidula, BMPEA, DMAA, DMBA, ephedra, methylsynephrine, and picamilon. Such ingredients have been determined to be unsafe, lack evidence of safety, don’t meet the definition of a dietary ingredient, or combinations of these issues. Some are even used as drugs in other countries.

Although these ingredients are not allowed in dietary supplements, you might still find them in some products, so always read product labels carefully. Service members especially take note! Since FDA has declared the ingredients listed above (and others) to be “illegal” or “not allowed” in dietary supplements for one reason or another, commands have restricted their use by military members. For more information about FDA’s role in regulating dietary supplement products and ingredients, visit FDA’s web page.

What’s the deal with DHEA?

Filed under: OPSS, Supplements
DHEA is a hormone and marketed to have anabolic effects. Does this make it illegal?

DHEA, short for dehydroepiandrosterone (also known as Prasterone), and chemical variations of this dietary supplement ingredient are commonly found in products marketed for sexual enhancement and bodybuilding such as testosterone boosters and prohormones. They’re also marketed to produce effects similar to anabolic steroids. Unlike anabolic steroids, DHEA is not illegal, but it is prohibited by professional sports organizations such as the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) and the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). Members of the Coast Guard should especially look out for supplements containing this ingredient, as they are not permitted to take any substances NCAA classifies as anabolic agents. To learn more, visit the OPSS FAQ about DHEA.

Stimulants – Are you up to speed?

Check out the new OPSS infographic about stimulants!

Operation Supplement Safety (OPSS) has a new infographic about stimulants. Do you want to know what types of dietary supplements commonly contain stimulants? Or how to tell if your supplement contains a stimulant? Or what can happen if you take too much or too many stimulants? Get up to speed and check out the infographic below with information on what you need to know about these dietary supplement ingredients. Use it in conjunction with the OPSS stimulants list to help you with these ingredients often found in dietary supplements.

Full Image of the Stimulants PDF

Acacia rigidula: another FDA target

Dietary supplement products containing Acadia rigidula are not allowed.

Another ingredient that has been showing up in dietary supplement products recently is Acadia rigidula. FDA recently declared that it is not acceptable in such products because it falls in the class known as a “new dietary ingredient.” A. rigidula is just the latest in a series of ingredients FDA has disallowed for this reason. Others include DMAA, DMBA, BMPEA, and aegeline. Visit the Operation Supplement Safety (OPSS) FAQ about Acacia rigidula to learn more, and explore the OPSS FAQs about ingredients to learn about others not permitted in dietary supplement products. especially BMPEA, which has been associated with A. rigidula.

Ketone supplements

Are ketone supplements the key to improving your performance?

If you’ve searched recently for dietary supplements to enhance your performance, you may have come across products marketed as “ketone supplements.” Before you consider taking any of these products, read the new Operation Supplement Safety FAQ about ketone supplements. Learn what ketone supplements are and if they’re worth the often-hefty price tag.

If you’re curious about other supplements marketed for performance, check out the OPSS Performance FAQs. Can’t find the answers you’re looking for? Send us a question using our Ask the Expert feature.

What’s in your supplement safety tool belt?

Filed under: OPSS, Supplements
Not all supplements are dangerous, but are you equipped with the tools to help you determine which ones are?

In the sea of dietary supplements, can you tell which ones are safe to take and which to avoid? Do you often find yourself confused, wondering what you should be looking for in a product? Operation Supplement Safety (OPSS) has you covered. Here are just some of the tools that OPSS provides to help you choose supplements wisely:

  • Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs). HPRC receives hundreds of questions every year, and we’ve put answers to the most frequently asked questions in this section of OPSS. You’ll find information about banned substances in the military, hot-topic dietary supplement ingredients, and more.
  • OPSS Scorecard. The scorecard consists of just 7 questions to show you what to look for on a product label and help you determine if a product is okay or a “no-go.”
  • OPSS High-Risk Supplement List. With HRSL, you can see if a certain dietary supplement product might pose a health or sport anti-doping risk.
  • Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database. NMCD, a partner of HPRC, provides information about the safety and effectiveness of thousands of dietary supplement products and ingredients. And best of all, it’s free to all DoD personnel with a “.mil” email address.

The goal of OPSS is to provide you with the most reliable and relevant information about dietary supplements, but if you can’t find what you’re looking for, send us a question using our Ask the Expert feature.

Imported supplement scams

Filed under: OPSS, Supplements
Products labeled as “natural” aren’t always what they seem.

If you buy dietary supplements at international stores, gas stations, or online, watch out. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) warns consumers about imported dietary supplements and nonprescription drug products, specifically those marketed as “natural.” Just because a product is labeled as “natural” does not necessarily make it safe or effective. In fact, many “natural” products have been found to contain undisclosed chemicals or drugs that can be harmful, and it’s possible that some products contain hidden ingredients that could make you pop hot on a drug test. To learn more, please read FDA’s “Some Imported Dietary Supplements…” Only have a minute? Watch their 60-second video below.

The only way to know if a product actually contains the ingredients listed on the label (and nothing else) is by testing it in a laboratory. Before you buy a dietary supplement, check the label to see if it’s been tested by a third-party organization.

New videos on supplement risks

Check out Performance Triad’s videos about the potential health hazards associated with dietary supplement use.

Do you know what’s in your dietary supplement? In the case of supplements, ignorance isn’t bliss, and what you don’t know can put your health at risk. Performance Triad has created 2 videos highlighting the dangers of dietary supplements. In “The Dangers of Supplements,” Drill Sergeant David Cross talks about the consequences he dealt with from using supplements, including permanent liver damage. Also watch the Operation Supplement Safety App video to learn more about what goes into dietary supplements. You can download the OPSS app to get access right in your hands to information about thousands of dietary supplement products and ingredients. Please visit the Apps tab of HPRC’s Tools for the Warfighters to download the app.

OPSS releases two new products

Use the new OPSS High-Risk Supplement List app and view “Get the Scoop on Supplements” to help you avoid dietary supplements that are dangerous to your health and career.

Operation Supplement Safety (OPSS) has two new products to help you stay safe when it comes to dietary supplements.

Now you can have the OPSS High-Risk Supplement List at your fingertips as a free app. With the app, you can either search the list for a specific product or use the barcode scanner to see if a product contains any high-risk ingredients such as stimulants, steroids, hormone-like ingredients, controlled substances, or unapproved drugs that could put your health or career at risk. For more information about how to download the app, please visit the Apps tab in Tools for Warfighters.

Want to learn more about supplements and how to choose them wisely? Check out the interactive presentation, “Get the Scoop on Supplements,” where you can watch videos, check your knowledge of dietary supplements, and find other helpful resources to help you reduce your risk of a positive urinalysis drug test and potential health issues. To view the presentation, please go to the Get the Scoop tab in Tools for Warfighters.

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