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Biofeedback for pain

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Harness the power of your mind with biofeedback and take control of pain.

Biofeedback teaches you how to control your body’s nervous system in order to reduce pain and stress and promote relaxation. Biofeedback can sometimes relieve musculoskeletal pain such as neck, back, and shoulder pain. It also may work for migraines and stress- and tension-induced headaches. For more in-depth information, read HPRC’s InfoReveal on biofeedback for pain management.

Acupuncture for pain

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Acupuncture is more commonly being used in the military as a method for pain treatment and management in conjunction with traditional practices.

Acupuncture is an ancient form of Chinese medicine. Thin needles are inserted into the skin at points of the body that are thought to regulate the body's flow of energy (also known as qi or chi). It often is used for common health concerns such as headaches and migraines, carpal tunnel syndrome, and back, joint, and chronic pain. For more in-depth information, read HPRC’s InfoReveal on acupuncture for pain management.

Mind-body strategies for pain

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Relaxation techniques, imagery, and redirection strategies are all mind-body techniques that could help you manage your pain. Read on to learn more.

Relaxation, meditation, imagery, and redirection strategies (such as distraction) may be helpful at reducing pain. These mind-body techniques can help you consciously relax your body, slow your breathing, reduce your blood pressure, and improve your sense of well-being. These techniques can also help you shift your focus to other things besides your pain. For more in-depth information, read HPRC’s InfoReveal on “Mind-body strategies for pain.”

New from HPRC: Pain Management

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An entirely new section has just been added to HPRC’s Total Force Fitness domain: Pain Management. It includes articles and resources to help Warfighters who need to manage pain—long-term and chronic.

Almost every Warfighter experiences pain at some point in his or her military career, but for many it can be a long or even chronic experience. Sometimes the treatment of pain is relatively straightforward, but at other times it needs a holistic treatment plan. And it’s no longer just a question of taking a pill. The DoD and VHA are exploring a range of alternative treatments for pain, including biofeedback, acupuncture, and various mind-body strategies that have been shown to be promising. HPRC’s new Pain Management section gives you an introduction to a variety of strategies you can do by yourself or with your doctor, and it points you to information and tools to help you understand and deal with your pain.

TENS (Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation) for pain?

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Many different types of pain respond to transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, or TENS—read on to find out if this therapy might be appropriate for you.

Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) is a sort of "electrical massage" that works by sending increased “traffic” to the brain to block pain signals. It may provide short-term relief for neuropathic/phantom, chronic, post-surgery, and arthritis pain, but it rarely offers long-term relief. For more in-depth information, read HPRC’s InfoReveal on TENS for pain management.

A pain in the…shin?

Shin splits can sideline you from your regular exercise routine, but proper treatment and rest can get you back in action sooner rather than later.

If you exercise regularly—or plan to start an exercise program—chances are you’ll experience shin splits at least once. That sharp, achy, sore, and/or throbbing feeling that runs down the front of your shin, also known as “tibial stress syndrome,” is a common condition among athletes, especially runners. The pain of shin splits can come from any number of underlying causes, such as overuse injuries, “flat feet,” or a more serious injury—stress fractures—usually from excessive and/or repetitive force on your legs. Usually shin splits will heal on their own with rest and basic self-care treatments, but it’s important to recognize the symptoms early on and to give yourself time to fully heal before easing back into your usual workout. See a doctor if the pain does not seem to improve with rest, if your shin is hot and inflamed, or if the swelling gets worse. To prevent shin splits, make sure that you wear the appropriate shoes for your type of foot, warm up before working out, vary the types of surfaces you run on, and address symptoms of pain early.

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