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Alerts

FDA warns consumers about caffeine powder. 

FDA advises consumers to stop using any supplement products labeled as OxyElite Pro or VERSA-1. Please see the following advisories: FDA -10/08/13, FDA - 10/11/13 and CDC - 10/08/13.

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Announcements

New article on reporting side effects of supplements
Just published in The New England Journal of Medicine: A recent article brings up dietary supplement issues you need to be aware of and discusses how dietary supplement side effects could be monitored better. A PDF of the April 3rd article is available free online.

3rd International Congress on Soldiers’ Physical Performance
August 18-21, 2014
The ICSPP delivers innovative scientific programming on soldiers’ physical performance with experts from around the world.

DMAA list updated for April 2014

Fueling Performance Photo Campaign
Share photos of how you fuel your performance and be featured on our Facebook page!

Dietary supplement module
Earn continuing education credits (if eligible) for this two-hour online module.

Operation LiveWell

Performance Triad

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Filed under: Performance News

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Keeping fit while deployed at sea

HPRC Fitness Arena:
Marines and sailors rely on creativity and enthusiasm to keep fit while at sea.

Aircraft carrier close up

Keeping physically fit is an important part of a military career. Aboard the USS Kearsarge Marines and sailors merge creativity and enthusiasm to push their physical fitness to even higher peaks. The October 05, 2010 edition of Military Health System News has an article on how Marines and sailors aboard the USS Kearsarge find ways to supplement their physical training while at sea.

Read the full article here.

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Which is better: 30 minutes of swimming or running?

HPRC Fitness Arena:
The Globe and Mail (Toronto) has an interesting piece on which activity is better for you – swimming or running?

Athletic man swimming

The Globe and Mail (Toronto) has an interesting piece on which activity is better for you - swimming or running? The conclusion, according to the article, is that swimming is good for muscles, joints and some (but not all) cardiovascular risk factors. But to get the full benefits from aerobic activity, include some land-based exercise in your routine at least once or twice a week.

Read the full article here.

 

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The hidden danger of extreme workouts

HPRC Fitness Arena:
Are high-intensity fitness programs safe?

The Off Duty section of the Air Force Times recently published an article that looks at the popularity high-intensity fitness programs and concerns about their safety.

Read the full article here.

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FTC and FDA examine Nestle's move into the functional food market segment

HPRC Fitness Arena:
The September 27, 2010 edition of the Wall Street Journal 's Health Blog reports that food giant Nestle is looking to expand their stake in "functional foods" - foods that might prevent diseases.

Bowl of fresh salad

The September 27, 2010 edition of the Wall Street Journal 's Health Blog reports that food giant Nestle' is looking to expand their stake in "functional foods" - foods that might prevent diseases. According to the article, the company is investing over $500 million into research in order to get a foothold into the functional food market. This move comes on the heels of yesterdays news that the Foot Trade Commission (FTC) is suing the maker of a popular pomegranate fruit drink, POM Wonderful LLC, in a widening effort by the government to clamp down on food ads that tout specific health benefits.

It remains to be seen how this will play out.

According to the press release, Nestlé will create a wholly owned subsidiary, Nestlé Health Science, as well as a research body, the Nestlé Institute of Health Sciences, “to pioneer a new industry between food and pharma,” the company said in a statement.

The article can be accessed here.

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Army plan aims to change the way soldiers eat and drink

HPRC Fitness Arena:

Soldier eating

The September 27, 2010 edition of Army Times has an article that focuses on to the Army's new focus on training soldiers to eat and drink healthier items that not only prepare him for strenuous physical activity, but also fuel him throughout the endeavor and aid in his recovery afterward.

Read the full article here.

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Study indicates better results by periodically alternating training program

HPRC Fitness Arena:
It has been known to trainers that alternating higher intensity and lower intensity training sessions is the most effective means for conditioning athletes. As reported in the September 20, 2010 edition of the Tauton Daily Gazzette (Tauton, MA), recent research indicates that it is not necessary to train at high-effort levels every exercise session.

It has been known to trainers that alternating higher intensity and lower intensity training sessions is the most effective means for conditioning athletes.

As reported in the September 20, 2010 edition of the Tauton Daily Gazzette (Tauton, MA),  recent research indicates that it is not necessary to train at high-effort levels every exercise session. In other words, a combination of higher intensity and lower intensity exercise is recommended for a sensible and successful fitness program. The full article can be accessed here.

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Soldiers speak out in support of CrossFit

HPRC Fitness Arena:
Last week, Wired Magazine ran an article on high intensity fitness programs that are being studied and evaluated in a review of high-intensity fitness programs by the Consortium for Health and Military Performance, or CHAMP, at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences.

Last week, Wired Magazine ran an article on high intensity fitness programs that  are  being studied and evaluated in a review of high-intensity fitness programs by the Consortium for Health and Military Performance (CHAMP) at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in Bethesda, MD.

In response, Wired has published a follow up article that offers a view of CrossFit from a soldier's perspective.

 

 


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Herbal supplements face new scrutiny

HPRC Fitness Arena:
There is a growing trend in the U.S. of consumers using a variety of dietary supplements in hopes of getting healthier, warding off disease and easing symptoms of various conditions. A recent Wall Street Journal article reports that the federal government is stepping up research into the safety and effectiveness of a wide range of products to help consumers make more informed choices about supplements.

There is a growing trend in the U.S. of consumers using a variety of dietary supplements in hopes of getting healthier, warding off disease and easing symptoms of various conditions.

In a September 14, 2010 article, The Wall Street Journal reports that the federal government is stepping up research into the safety and effectiveness of a wide range of products to help consumers make more informed choices about supplements. The article in full-text can be accessed here.

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Marines address fitness testing

HPRC Fitness Arena:
Failing a fitness test can get a Marine passed over for promotion,perhaps ending career hopes. According to an article from KVOA.com based in Tucson, AZ, there is growing pressure to hold marines to a higher standard for physical fitness and combat readiness.

Failing a fitness test can get a Marine passed over for promotion, perhaps ending career hopes. According to this article from KVOA.com based in Tucson, AZ, there is growing pressure to hold marines to a higher standard for physical fitness and combat readiness. In response, the Marine Corps Semper Fit program is investing millions in new gyms with functional workout rooms, recreation programs, and nutrition classes.

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Risky marketing: Dietary supplements and teen athletics

HPRC Fitness Arena:
The Columbus Dispatch (Ohio) recently ran a five-day series titled "Little leagues, big costs" In this series, The Dispatch explores where youth sports have taken wrong turns in recent years.

The Columbus Dispatch (Ohio) recently ran a five-day series titled "Little leagues, big costs" In this series, The Dispatch explores where youth sports have taken wrong turns in recent years.

The link below from that series contains an article that focuses on the dangers of how some unregulated dietary supplements are being targeted at teens

Supplements target teens, pose dangers and are virtually unregulated

 

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